U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-11-2013, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
27,400 posts, read 15,822,708 times
Reputation: 9900

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Bull!!

Every worker, including minimum wage employees, have accomplishments.
I wouldn't say that exactly. Let me go through your examples to see how many actually are relevant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Employee of the Month?
Not every people can be which makes it impressive. However, unless you are a lesser employee with a great month, you will not get employee of the month. It's not as easy as one would think for lower employees unless you work with scrubs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did you train anyone?
Isn't that mostly for managers, trainers or lead positions that would likely have that in their job description? Now if you asked to be a trainer or learn to a trainer, that is different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did you learn any new skills?
That can be hard, I get into this later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Are you self taught in any software packages?
How would this be an accomplishment unless we are talking about something special like SAP, or an Oracle based software? Anyone can teach themselves Microsoft Office, even lesser used ones like Project and Visio.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Do you type faster than last year due to personal effort?
Ok, I'll give you that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Were you involved in any community or volunteer groups that taught you job skills?
I mentioned Boy Scouts but apparently it JUST is a "hobby" so I shouldn't...

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did anyone say anything nice about you on the job?
I'll agree with that but it does open up the issue of how credible is Joe from Moosehead, Manitoba, Canada in saying this job applicant has done his job title?

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Were you promoted?
Wouldn't that be just another position in the company that would be in your resume. Though to be fair, I wouldn't disagree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did you get a raise or bonus?
There aren't true raises anymore (most are flat raises to be COLA.) Bonuses are about it but aren't bonuses typically tied to more sales positions?

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did you make your boss look good by something you did?
I don't get this one at all unless it is the whole this applicant did this for their supervisor so I want them to try to do the same for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did you come up with a way to make the task more efficient?
But was it implemented? It's all well and good to come up with ideas and propose them (because we all know opinions are like bungholes) but unless it was implemented, it is not a good idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did you set any goals and achieved them?
Who doesn't set goals and try to achieve them. This can go on for as short as an hourly or daily basis or as long as a year+.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did you handle more customers than before?
I find this one tough to say is good or not. Sure you can ring up more items and speed transactions faster but the individual situation is what you need to worry about. If you take the time and help one customer in their situation, it can go miles. One example is my mother and I were in Walmart on Black Saturday buying a video game that was on sale in Target. One clerk said it wasn't applicable because it was a Black Friday ad (however the sale was still active through Sunday) so we went to the front. We found a manager who agreed with us and rang up the purchase for us even after that first clerk said "You're going to get that for them?" That manager went above and beyond what they needed to do. Now if that manager was just a clerk, that transaction and doing right is worth much more than just doing them fast. I guess this is because I grew up in the Disney service model of talking to customers and individualizing the service to them rather than worrying about speed off the bat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Did you attend a training session and use your new skills?
How would that be unless you sought the training out yourself? Many training sessions are just done by the company. As I said, I worked with Disney and I went for a training seminar near the end of my time with them. it was because Disney redesigned their service parameters to simplify them. They went from the Seven Dwarfs of service to the Basics. I never got to use that training. Most company training is like that (unless it a precursor to moving up which in that case, it is like seeking out training yourself.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
I could go on and on.

And in today's tough job market if you have no accomplishments and can't describe them effectively, you won't get hired.
I can agree but many in HR or hiring managers may find the same holes in the accomplishments I found. Some I can drive the tallest truck in the world, Bigfoot #5 through.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-11-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
27,400 posts, read 15,822,708 times
Reputation: 9900
Quote:
Originally Posted by D. Scott View Post
Not 100% true. There are lots of scams or crappy jobs on Craigslist, but some legitimate companies post there and get good candidates. My company is one and I am responsible for training them and most have been great, 2 in fact I can see becoming trainers themselves. Its just sifting though the piles of junk that makes Craigslist a task. I have been at my place of work for years and its a good job that starts at a higher above pay then many places for those qualified.
There is crap jobs you can find with any job search website. They have crap sales (ones that wouldn't seem like they are bad) and other jobs. I've seen sitter jobs posted on some of these websites. Craigslist you can find some good jobs but you have to wade through the crap jobs like with any website. I found it's no better or worse than any other website.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Moscow
2,080 posts, read 3,071,904 times
Reputation: 2564
I ride in the middle on this one.

I don't list hobbies, unless relevant to the job being applied for. Most employers won't care that I homebrew, refinish antique furniture, homebuilt my stereo, hike, camp, or have a fix-up car.

But, I do have a short section of my resume for "Accomplishments." Employers do want to know that someone goes the extra mile. This lists offices held in civic clubs, awards earned, etc. And, yes, I do list my Eagle Scout and continued volunteer Scouting experience. Have done so for over 20 years. It very rarely hurts, and to anyone familiar with the program it can make a huge difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 12:01 PM
 
Location: where people are either too stupid to leave or too stuck to move
3,997 posts, read 5,733,829 times
Reputation: 3636
i can't believe how many times you keep making these kind of post
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Moscow
2,080 posts, read 3,071,904 times
Reputation: 2564
Quote:
Originally Posted by L'Artiste View Post
i can't believe how many times you keep making these kind of post
63 posts so far. Who are you referring to?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 12:07 PM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,627,947 times
Reputation: 4358
You are confusing "accomplishments" with "job description"!
That's kind of sad.

"Accomplishments" are things you've done extra!
If learning a new software was expected of me, that's NOT an accomplishment, that's me doing my job!


Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Bull!!

Every worker, including minimum wage employees, have accomplishments.

Employee of the Month?

Did you train anyone?

Did you learn any new skills?

Are you self taught in any software packages?

Do you type faster than last year due to personal effort?

Were you involved in any community or volunteer groups that taught you job skills?

Did anyone say anything nice about you on the job?

Were you promoted?

Did you get a raise or bonus?

Did you make your boss look good by something you did?

Did you come up with a way to make the task more efficient?

Did you set any goals and achieved them?

Did you handle more customers than before?

Did you attend a training session and use your new skills?

I could go on and on.

And in today's tough job market if you have no accomplishments and can't describe them effectively, you won't get hired.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 02:09 PM
 
11,171 posts, read 8,570,826 times
Reputation: 28176
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_grimace View Post
Apparently good and experienced despite the fact the applicant can't show the effort and take the time to make sure his resume is grammatically correct? No, he isn't perfectly good and experienced in my book! That's just lazy!
I agree completely. How can I consider you as an employee when you display ignorance and a lack of concern about details on your resume?

If you can't spell, conjugate verbs, use proper punctuation and proofread a VERY important document such as your own resume, why would I trust you to handle the company's business?

Sorry, but if I were a hiring manager, I would reject any resume with simple mistakes that point to an unlearned, lazy candidate.

Seriously folks, have someone else review your resume for errors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,571,770 times
Reputation: 29034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keim View Post
I ride in the middle on this one.

I don't list hobbies, unless relevant to the job being applied for. Most employers won't care that I homebrew, refinish antique furniture, homebuilt my stereo, hike, camp, or have a fix-up car.

But, I do have a short section of my resume for "Accomplishments." Employers do want to know that someone goes the extra mile. This lists offices held in civic clubs, awards earned, etc. And, yes, I do list my Eagle Scout and continued volunteer Scouting experience. Have done so for over 20 years. It very rarely hurts, and to anyone familiar with the program it can make a huge difference.
I agree wholeheartedly with having an Accomplishments section on a resume that includes things you've done that were not part of previously held "jobs" and may not even be things you were paid for. For example, my resume is in the communications field but I'm interested in art and have served on Boards of Directors for several arts organizations. Those appointments are on my resume. I got invited onto boards because of my corporate position, so I considered it an adjunct to my job. While I was on those boards, I wrote grant applications for the groups. I list the amount of money those grants brought in on my resume. I have published two books that had nothing to do with my professional job and were written on my own time. But given that my resume relates to the communication field, those book publications are listed under Accomplishments. I also once had a program on public radio related to the subject of my books which was on the air for several years. That accomplishment is also included on my resume. As far as I'm concerned, it's a further demonstration that I have communication skills.

I had one boss who was president of a her city's historic society and another who was national president of a club which has hundred of thousands of members. Those accomplishments are on their resumes even though neither has anything to do with their professions. My brother was a zoning commissioner in his city. It's position appointed by the mayor; I encouraged him to put that on his resume. To earn positions of authority like those demonstrates leadership, as well the ability to work with a variety of different types of people and handle controversy. If you have a position like that, it's also a good idea to put the annual spending of the group on your resume. Whether the organization you were president of has a budget of $100,000 or ten million, your leadership implies the ability to handle other people's money.

I don't put hobbies or special interests on a resume. But if extracurricular activities attest to skills or experience that make you more marketable by demonstrating management ability, by all means they belong on the professional resume that advertises you. For example, I wouldn't put "I play tennis" on a resume, but if I were on the U.S. Olympic tennis team, THAT would be there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 02:51 PM
 
278 posts, read 242,998 times
Reputation: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kineticity View Post
Ah, I think I see the problem here: Most people apparently don't have any hobbies outside of their college frat volleyball games?

If that's true, then no wonder listing my hobbies on my resume actually gets me positive results. Mine actually reflect the fact that I have mature interests and enjoy intellectual pursuits, rather than being stuck at age 20 in perpetuity.
Cigar smoking and devouring the classics? No one cares
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
27,400 posts, read 15,822,708 times
Reputation: 9900
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
You are confusing "accomplishments" with "job description"!
That's kind of sad.

"Accomplishments" are things you've done extra!
If learning a new software was expected of me, that's NOT an accomplishment, that's me doing my job!
I cannot believe that I missed that myself. That and the whole well you did X with this company but we are in Y, these skills are irrelevant (even when there is a connection.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top