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Old 12-11-2013, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
453 posts, read 519,989 times
Reputation: 666

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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
I agree completely. How can I consider you as an employee when you display ignorance and a lack of concern about details on your resume?

If you can't spell, conjugate verbs, use proper punctuation and proofread a VERY important document such as your own resume, why would I trust you to handle the company's business?

Sorry, but if I were a hiring manager, I would reject any resume with simple mistakes that point to an unlearned, lazy candidate.

Seriously folks, have someone else review your resume for errors.
Alert the media and then take cover in an Apocalypse-proof bunker, boys and girls (and anything else). Charlygal and I actually agree 100% on something.
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Old 12-11-2013, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
453 posts, read 519,989 times
Reputation: 666
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeyHowdy View Post
Cigar smoking and devouring the classics? No one cares
Ugh, cigars? You brought up cigars?

No, as I already explained upthread, I have intellectual hobbies that have caught the eye of more than one hiring manager and resulted in my getting the interview and in one case, the job.

I don't really know how to explain that in monosyllables and I'm not going to try. Either you understand or your don't.
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Old 12-11-2013, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Moscow
2,080 posts, read 3,068,696 times
Reputation: 2564
Mah-no-syll-a-what's?
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Old 12-11-2013, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
6,106 posts, read 7,270,644 times
Reputation: 4492
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_grimace View Post
- Just a couple weeks ago, there was a resume of a guy who had an 8 page resume. 8 PAGES..... He pretty much described every position with 2-3 paragraphs of description (written style, not bullet points), and the formatting was awful. His resume was a mess of different font types, styles, and sizes. This guy was only a senior level designer as well, but even if he had 20 years of experience you don't need more than 3 pages max. I couldn't believe it, how this guy would ever get hired, but yet this guy had a respectable work history.
Sounds like a case of keyword stuffing so he can sort to the top of the applicant tracking system.
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Old 12-11-2013, 08:30 PM
 
278 posts, read 242,749 times
Reputation: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kineticity View Post
Ugh, cigars? You brought up cigars?

No, as I already explained upthread, I have intellectual hobbies that have caught the eye of more than one hiring manager and resulted in my getting the interview and in one case, the job.

I don't really know how to explain that in monosyllables and I'm not going to try. Either you understand or your don't.
I brought up Cigars sarcastically as you were bragging about your "mature and sophisticated" hobbies. Certainly, cigar connoisseurs are mature and sophisticated, no?

Devouring the classics isn't an intellectual hobby?

Hmm...ok then.

If you are say, an office manager, you should list related skill sets, not hobbies. Having excellent organizational skills is a skill set. Being a Girl Scout Troop leader, which may show leadership abilities rather than being just a hobby, can go under "Leadership positions". Organizing your stamp collection? A hobby, that does not belong on your resume, no matter how much it proves you are great at organizing. If you don't grasp the distinction between skill set, leadership position, and hobby, well, I can't put it into monosyllables for you. Either you get it, or you don't.

If you are say, a free lance journalist, listing your work should speak for itself. (Eg New Yorker vol. 2, pg 31, "How to be a ridiculous human being" etc) . The fact that your hobbies include reading the classics may have helped you develop an eye for good writing and enhanced your own writing abilities, but listing it is unnecessary if you have a strong portfolio. Besides the OP was referring to non- work related hobbies that make you seem more well rounded. Silly things like beach volleyball champs at Sigma Foxtrot Omega (not going to list a real frat so as to spare feelings and all).

"Why, Mr. Johnson, your deep understanding of astrophysics is what set you apart from all of the other candidates looking to manage this HMO Company", said no one, ever.

Last edited by HeyHowdy; 12-11-2013 at 09:01 PM.. Reason: Allow me to dumb it down for you.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Central East Austin
614 posts, read 593,344 times
Reputation: 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by D. Scott View Post
Many threads on this, Often with good advice on how to write or re-write ones. I came across a handwritten one once that was given to me. That was bad. Usual basic rules are one page if possible and have it stand out within a few seconds so it does not get "filed."

That's truly hilarious about the handwritten resume, but I have to disagree on your other point. The one-page rule only holds true if you are early in your career. A professional with years of experience is expected to have two or more pages.

Last edited by petro; 12-11-2013 at 11:44 PM..
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Old 12-12-2013, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
27,351 posts, read 15,795,936 times
Reputation: 9879
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeyHowdy View Post
I brought up Cigars sarcastically as you were bragging about your "mature and sophisticated" hobbies. Certainly, cigar connoisseurs are mature and sophisticated, no?

Devouring the classics isn't an intellectual hobby?

Hmm...ok then.

If you are say, an office manager, you should list related skill sets, not hobbies. Having excellent organizational skills is a skill set. Being a Girl Scout Troop leader, which may show leadership abilities rather than being just a hobby, can go under "Leadership positions". Organizing your stamp collection? A hobby, that does not belong on your resume, no matter how much it proves you are great at organizing. If you don't grasp the distinction between skill set, leadership position, and hobby, well, I can't put it into monosyllables for you. Either you get it, or you don't.

If you are say, a free lance journalist, listing your work should speak for itself. (Eg New Yorker vol. 2, pg 31, "How to be a ridiculous human being" etc) . The fact that your hobbies include reading the classics may have helped you develop an eye for good writing and enhanced your own writing abilities, but listing it is unnecessary if you have a strong portfolio. Besides the OP was referring to non- work related hobbies that make you seem more well rounded. Silly things like beach volleyball champs at Sigma Foxtrot Omega (not going to list a real frat so as to spare feelings and all).

"Why, Mr. Johnson, your deep understanding of astrophysics is what set you apart from all of the other candidates looking to manage this HMO Company", said no one, ever.
I agree, there are many "hobbies" that become invested is different. Boy Scouts as a leader or youth is rashly misunderstood. It is not simply boys going camping, there's a lot of planning for monthly programming for the troops. At some points during the year, I spent an entire week doing Boy Scout outings due to troop meetings, Order of the Arrow Chapter meetings, Order of the Arrow elections, service projects and outings. That requires time management to work school in there. Also it takes teaching ability, something I had through being a troop guide, instructor, den chief and junior assistant scout master. I spent much time with younger scouts helping them become better scouts and learning skills.

I am not butt hurt about it because there are fewer people in the scouting program now (for issues I've said earlier in this thread) so not as many people know of the skills one learn from it. It is hard to convey that to others without lugging my huge Eagle Scout service project binder to every interview I go to.
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Old 12-12-2013, 11:29 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,728 times
Reputation: 10
People who are studying in college their teachers should teach them how to write resumes and how to face the world with it.. failing so these mistakes happen..
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Old 12-12-2013, 11:34 AM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,624,165 times
Reputation: 4358
How much time is spent in high schools and college studying the art of writing a proper resume, and how do people usually stay UPDATED on HRs who change what is appropriate as frequent as changing underwear? Fair question.

I have to assume (even though "assuming" isn't nice) that HRs don't really expect candidates to miraculously know all this stuff from a divine source over night!
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Old 12-12-2013, 11:38 AM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,624,165 times
Reputation: 4358
Quote:
Originally Posted by princymelba View Post
People who are studying in college their teachers should teach them how to write resumes and how to face the world with it.. failing so these mistakes happen..
But...if those teachers have not been looking for jobs lately who is teaching THEM what to teach students? Obviously what worked in 1989 doesn't work today.
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