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Old 12-10-2013, 11:26 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,747,775 times
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We generally tie paying to fly someone for an interview with paying for relocation. If we aren't going to pay for relocation for a position we aren't go to pay for travel for the interview.
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Old 12-11-2013, 05:10 AM
 
5,910 posts, read 6,708,989 times
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It depends......

How much you want the job; how much you are willing to move to the new town; how likely you feel going in that the new company will offer you a job.

So, you turn the tables in your favor and use the leverage which they are giving you:

"I am very interested in your company, and very interested in the position; HOWEVER, if I am going to come out there, I want to make sure we fully use the time; THEREFORE, will you set up a full day of interviews with everyone in the hiring process, and perhaps have someone show me around the area?"

This puts some pressure on them, let's them know you are serious, and PERHAPS moves them along to divulge that they are SERIOUS about your candidacy. In a best case scenario they will acknowledge that they are ready to hire you, and the visit is just a formality.

Bottom Line: If you are going to pay for this out of your pocket, get your money's worth.
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Old 12-11-2013, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,791 posts, read 13,277,872 times
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If they aren't paying for interview travel they aren't that into you. You are on their meh let's interview him/her for the heck of it or as a backup or as a part of our eeoc/policy requirements. Most likely you will get burned.
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Old 12-11-2013, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Arizona
5,509 posts, read 6,125,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manderly6 View Post
We generally tie paying to fly someone for an interview with paying for relocation. If we aren't going to pay for relocation for a position we aren't go to pay for travel for the interview.
This is very much along the same lines I was thinking. If a company is upfront that they are looking for local candidates and advised an out of state candidate from the beginning there would be no relo or travel reimbursement, the interviewee should use their judgment if it's worth the cost. On the other hand, in my opinion if a company knowingly recruits an out of state candidate and won't pay travel and relo costs, it would be a red flag to me. My company is pretty big on treating everyone with consistency, so if I don't have a relo budget for a position, or can't get it, I'm not supposed to consider out of area candidates even if they claim they will relo at their own expense.
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Old 12-11-2013, 06:53 AM
 
35,109 posts, read 40,202,457 times
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If you sought the company yourself it is up to you to pay for your flight and any other costs associated with going for the interview.
If the company sought you via a recruiter then I would think it would be up to them to pay for the cost.
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Old 12-11-2013, 07:06 AM
 
1,076 posts, read 1,498,043 times
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If the company is recruiting for the position out of their local area, they should definitely handle all normal travel costs. If they are only recruiting locally, and you happened to find out about it through friends or family there, it is fair for them to expect you to pay to get yourself there. Same goes for if they did not advertise an opening but you approached them hoping they would find one.
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Old 12-11-2013, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,931 posts, read 8,394,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
If you sought the company yourself it is up to you to pay for your flight and any other costs associated with going for the interview.
If the company sought you via a recruiter then I would think it would be up to them to pay for the cost.
Absolutely wrong.

I have never used a recruiter in my life, and I have had interview costs paid many times.

Companies will be up front about paying for interview costs if they are going to do so. I have never had to guess who will be paying.

Occasionally they will pay for everything directly with the airline and hotel, more frequently you will pay up front and be reimbursed in 30-45 days. Once in a while there is a split, where the airline booking is reimbursed but the hotel is a direct bill.

I can't remember exactly how many out of state/international interviews I have done. 15-20 most likely. The trips with company paid travel resulted in 5 or so offers, 2 of which I accepted, rejecting others. The two trips that I paid for went nowhere.

Although I have done so in the past, I would not pay for long distance interview travel again.
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Old 12-11-2013, 07:22 AM
 
35,109 posts, read 40,202,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Absolutely wrong.

I have never used a recruiter in my life, and I have had interview costs paid many times.

Companies will be up front about paying for interview costs if they are going to do so. I have never had to guess who will be paying.

Occasionally they will pay for everything directly with the airline and hotel, more frequently you will pay up front and be reimbursed in 30-45 days. Once in a while there is a split, where the airline booking is reimbursed but the hotel is a direct bill.

I can't remember exactly how many out of state/international interviews I have done. 15-20 most likely. The trips with company paid travel resulted in 5 or so offers, 2 of which I accepted, rejecting others. The two trips that I paid for went nowhere.

Although I have done so in the past, I would not pay for long distance interview travel again.
Absolutely wrong for you but not for everyone.
Some companies pay if you seek them other companies do not pay if you seek them.
I would not assume the company will pay nor would I ask for reimbursement if I sought the company.
If I was recruited I would ask about the cost of the trip if it was not mentioned, just so I could be
prepared financially.
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Old 12-11-2013, 09:27 AM
 
4,749 posts, read 3,607,028 times
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I once flew out for an interview, but never again. It was my choice to go out there, and I knew then that I was more interested in their job than they were in my application, and I don't hold any grudges. They probably made the right move in going with another candidate for all I know. Not getting the job isn't the point.

I think that far too often, we forget that employment is a two-way street - we're hiring the company just as much as the company is hiring us. I think that one of the reasons people end up in bad work situations is partly because they don't value themselves enough to be selective and proactive in the job search.

My objections to paying the full costs of the flight go beyond just the cost of the flight. It's all about showing the prospective employer how much you value yourself. I can't speak for others, but I want employers to know that I value and respect both their company and myself. If you give them any indication that you don't value yourself, then you're setting yourself up to be walked up somewhere down the road.

I would be okay with paying half of the costs of the flight and lodging - it's at least balanced and even that way. But I wouldn't pay for the whole thing. Why should you? The way I look at it, if they're really a good company, then they should be willing to pay for someone they're serious about. See, if they decide not to pay actually says a lot about them as a company. It says that they're not willing to spend money for quality for one thing -- and when it comes to paying for quality resources, what can be more important than human capital? What other things that they really need are they not going to pay for? If you do an outstanding job, are they going to be more or less likely to give you a raise?

And that's assuming they're really serious about your application. And what if they're not? They're asking you to pay to come meet people when it could well be that you won't even get the job in the end? That's just disrespectful. Jobs require commitment, and you need to be selective about people you commit yourself (and your family) to.

Last edited by chickenfriedbananas; 12-11-2013 at 09:38 AM..
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Old 12-11-2013, 09:36 AM
 
4,749 posts, read 3,607,028 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AV8n View Post
If the company is recruiting for the position out of their local area, they should definitely handle all normal travel costs. If they are only recruiting locally, and you happened to find out about it through friends or family there, it is fair for them to expect you to pay to get yourself there. Same goes for if they did not advertise an opening but you approached them hoping they would find one.
I think that's a fair point to make, and I basically agree under these circumstances.

However, if they put an advertisement on a site like indeed or some other search engine (assuming it wasn't just fed into the meta search by the web crawler), then they're hiring nationally, even if their base of operations is in Charlotte and even if they're primarily interested in local candidates. It's going to attract people outside the area.

They still might not want to pay expenses for an out of state candidate -- that's totally fine. I guess the point I would make is that job hunters should nevertheless value themselves enough not to pursue such jobs. If I felt like I was really a good match for that company, if I thought the company really felt the same in return, I'd ask for at least partial reimbursement. And if they balk, then they balk, and they go with someone else. I think that's the approach people need to take.

People sometimes make the mistake of job hunting. What they really ought to be doing instead is career building, and that takes a selective and methodical approach. Obviously, if someone's laid off and staring a foreclosure in the face, that's one thing -- circumstances can dictate actions. But in general, it's best to not be so desperate that one would show a company before day one on the job that they're willing to put themselves at a decided disadvantage. Sure, it's inherent that they're writing the checks, and that's an understood power that employers have. But it doesn't have to be an absolute power.
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