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Old 12-14-2013, 03:51 PM
 
8,986 posts, read 8,136,151 times
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It all depends on the JOB that is being filled.

If it is a job needing specialized education and experience and only a low amount of qualified applicants, managers will consider hiring people from any where they can find that applicant. The key is qualified applicants. Finding that truly qualified person may require they go out of town.

If it is a low paid job with no experience required and lots of applicants, they will hire someone local every times. Less problems.
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Old 12-14-2013, 05:19 PM
 
1,191 posts, read 1,538,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jman07 View Post
OK. So if the person who applies lives 4 hours away, its safe to assume they are relocating, but employers still don't want to look at them.
You are assuming the best case scenario. And yes, sometimes it works out great: the person from 4 hours away gets the job, is very qualified, stays long-term and does great.

But other times, it doesn't work out and if you've hired enough people, you may see a pattern start to emerge that can put long-distance people into a riskier category. Not that anyone can be hired with no risk or that every long-distance applicant is a flake, but people who move in from long-distance are less likely to stick around long-term. They have no friends or family or support system in place. Now, some people are naturally great socially and will make those friends. Maybe they even have family in the area. But quite a few people move someplace new, hate it, and then go home. It's definitely a bigger risk than someone who has lived in the area for 10 years, is stable, and has a life established there.

Additionally, some people are just flakes. They may think they can relocate and not figure out when the time comes how expensive it's going to be. Or that they can't get an apartment with bad credit. Or they apply for the job because they think they want to move, then their BF who broke up with them wants to mend things and they decide not to move. Or they want to move but have three dogs and are moving to a pet-unfriendly city where they can't find a willing landlord. Or whatever. So the company wastes time and energy and it never pans out. As with everything, a few bad apples spoils the bunch and leads to hiring managers being warier the next time around.
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Old 12-14-2013, 06:05 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,754 posts, read 9,065,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Garcia View Post
When the new year rolls around, I like many others will be actively looking for a new position. Like some, I'm also willing to drive a far distance for the right price. With that said, do you think hiring managers or HR look at an applicant’s address when determining who gets interviewed or not? If my skill set listed on my resume speaks and say I’m worthy of interviewing, is there a chance one might say “Ohh, he lives an hour from the office, let’s not interview him.”
It shouldn't have an effect, but sadly there are some people who only want to hire locals.
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Old 12-14-2013, 06:59 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,481,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Garcia View Post
When the new year rolls around, I like many others will be actively looking for a new position. Like some, I'm also willing to drive a far distance for the right price. With that said, do you think hiring managers or HR look at an applicant’s address when determining who gets interviewed or not? If my skill set listed on my resume speaks and say I’m worthy of interviewing, is there a chance one might say “Ohh, he lives an hour from the office, let’s not interview him.”
It depends on the area. In Houston and Dallas, many employers hire people with long commutes. Most people with kids live outside Houston/Dallas, but they make a 40-60 minute to work.
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Old 12-14-2013, 07:08 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,481,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jman07 View Post
OK. So if the person who applies lives 4 hours away, its safe to assume they are relocating, but employers still don't want to look at them.
Nope, employers look at them all the time. I moved 4-5 hours away to live in Dallas. A Dallas employer flew down to Houston and interviewed several candidates.

It helps with the negotiation also. An employer offered a $20k raise, because they had no relocation package. They were concerned that I wouldn't move without a relocation package. I rather have the $20k raise anyway. A relocation package is a one-time deal.
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Old 12-14-2013, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
1,230 posts, read 1,884,972 times
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If you're considering a move to another city, in the same state, should you just write your interest in relocating on your cover letter, or is it better to rent a mailbox from the UPS store? The mailbox would allow you to have a local address.
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
453 posts, read 520,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetropolitanTN View Post
If you're considering a move to another city, in the same state, should you just write your interest in relocating on your cover letter, or is it better to rent a mailbox from the UPS store? The mailbox would allow you to have a local address.
I'd be leery of using a rented mailbox, because while it would give you a local address, a quick Google Maps search of the address would reveal that it isn't a residence but a UPS store or whatever.

Personally, I'm of two minds regarding how to actually handle this, as I may well be facing it soon myself. I'm fortunate enough to have in-hand an offer of temporary living space from a friend who lives within about a 45-minute drive of the area to which I plan to relocate, so I may use his address on my resume when the time comes to begin searching in earnest for a job around there, and then state in the cover letter that I will be moving in with a friend. Or I could just use that address without the explanation, but then if a potential employer called me up and wanted me to come for an interview right away, I'd have to let him or her know that I'm currently about 350 miles away and would need time to arrange the road trip.

Alternatively, I might use my own current, out-of-state address, and simply make it abundantly clear in my cover letter that 1) I am applying for this job because I wish to relocate and 2) that I already have a short-term rental arranged in the area, ready and waiting for me so that I will be able to start a new job and then take my time finding permanent housing.

Obviously not everyone will have a situation like mine, but for those who do, those might be some options.
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:20 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,481,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetropolitanTN View Post
If you're considering a move to another city, in the same state, should you just write your interest in relocating on your cover letter, or is it better to rent a mailbox from the UPS store? The mailbox would allow you to have a local address.
When I was applying for jobs in another city, I did not rent a mailbox. I did mention the move in a cover letter for one job. For another job, I didn't include a cover letter at all.

The askamanager blog advises job seekers to add it to both the resume and cover letter. why long-distance job searching sucks and what you can do about it
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Old 12-15-2013, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,029 posts, read 8,451,682 times
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I have relocated 3 times, once cross country. I have never used a local address and have always discussed my desire to relocate in the cover letter.

If you are applying for middle management or higher, using your real address also allows the hiring company to pay for your interview travel.

Junior level jobs are different.
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Old 12-15-2013, 08:00 AM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 8,658,953 times
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some jobs do care, others do not. ive been turned away from jobs because i live further away (i encountered this more so when applying for govt jobs though). most private world jobs actually like it when people relocate from out of state to a job, even if they do not have relocation bennies.
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