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Old 01-10-2014, 08:58 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,475,905 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangirl32 View Post
Just so you know, I do practice a lot before interviews. I do behavioral interview questions, research the company, their products, their competitors so that I'm informed. I also ask them questions on the interview about the role.
Sometimes you can do everything well and it's still not enough.
Are you interviewing with yourself? |How many PEOPLE did you practice interviewing with this week? It should be at least 10 different people. In my group, we were doing 30 interviews with 15 people every week for 3 months. We averaged a 40% increase for over 100 people within 3-6 months. If you did 10 practice interviews and only before an interview, thats 10 sessions. If any one of the competition is doing 120 interviews(30 interviews x 4 weeks) with 15 people, you are being outworked easily.

It only takes 1 person to outwork you to lose out on the job.

Last edited by move4ward; 01-10-2014 at 09:16 PM..
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Old 01-10-2014, 09:41 PM
 
8,980 posts, read 8,122,996 times
Reputation: 19502
I was at one time the Division Sales Manager for a large corp, for half the country. In the first 5 minutes of the interview, I would know if I wanted to hire this person or not.

If they came to the interview and seemed frightened, and unsure of themselves, I was not interested. I have a sister in law that was running HR for a large electronics company. We have discussed this and she said she and other HR managers she knows feel the same way.

HINT: Walk in and act completely confident with yourself. Be gregarious. Don't sit and think when you are asked a question, but be quick about answering it. That alone is a big factor.

If the interviewer watches you sit and think before answering questions, they start to wonder if you are making up answers if you sit and try to figure out what to say. They feel you do not know how to make decisions, and are a slow thinker. I have seen interviewees that took 2 or 3 minutes before they would even tell you their name. Interviewers want to see people that are fast thinkers, and can give a quick and accurate answer, not some one that hems and haws before they answer.

You may be nervous as h***, but try to not act this way. Confidence will get you more jobs than anything. Remember they are getting usually hundreds of applications for every good job. The strong confidant person, that thinks on their feet, and can quickly give good answers, is the one that is going to impress them and will get the job.

When you submit a cover letter and/or a resume, make it one that is tailored for that particular job you are applying for. Do a sales job, of why you are the right person for the job. That is rule #1 to get a job. Never, and I mean never, just send a boiler plate one size fits all resume, those are rejected without even being considered for an interview.
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Old 01-11-2014, 02:33 PM
 
8 posts, read 7,029 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
I was at one time the Division Sales Manager for a large corp, for half the country. In the first 5 minutes of the interview, I would know if I wanted to hire this person or not.

If they came to the interview and seemed frightened, and unsure of themselves, I was not interested. I have a sister in law that was running HR for a large electronics company. We have discussed this and she said she and other HR managers she knows feel the same way.

HINT: Walk in and act completely confident with yourself. Be gregarious. Don't sit and think when you are asked a question, but be quick about answering it. That alone is a big factor.

If the interviewer watches you sit and think before answering questions, they start to wonder if you are making up answers if you sit and try to figure out what to say. They feel you do not know how to make decisions, and are a slow thinker. I have seen interviewees that took 2 or 3 minutes before they would even tell you their name. Interviewers want to see people that are fast thinkers, and can give a quick and accurate answer, not some one that hems and haws before they answer.

You may be nervous as h***, but try to not act this way. Confidence will get you more jobs than anything. Remember they are getting usually hundreds of applications for every good job. The strong confidant person, that thinks on their feet, and can quickly give good answers, is the one that is going to impress them and will get the job.

When you submit a cover letter and/or a resume, make it one that is tailored for that particular job you are applying for. Do a sales job, of why you are the right person for the job. That is rule #1 to get a job. Never, and I mean never, just send a boiler plate one size fits all resume, those are rejected without even being considered for an interview.
Thanks for the advice. I'm going to be more confident on my next job interviews.
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Old 01-11-2014, 02:44 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 8,652,012 times
Reputation: 6514
Sometimes it sucks.
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Old 01-11-2014, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Wooster, Ohio
1,036 posts, read 789,217 times
Reputation: 1490
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
I was at one time the Division Sales Manager for a large corp, for half the country. In the first 5 minutes of the interview, I would know if I wanted to hire this person or not.

If they came to the interview and seemed frightened, and unsure of themselves, I was not interested. I have a sister in law that was running HR for a large electronics company. We have discussed this and she said she and other HR managers she knows feel the same way.

HINT: Walk in and act completely confident with yourself. Be gregarious. Don't sit and think when you are asked a question, but be quick about answering it. That alone is a big factor.

If the interviewer watches you sit and think before answering questions, they start to wonder if you are making up answers if you sit and try to figure out what to say. They feel you do not know how to make decisions, and are a slow thinker. I have seen interviewees that took 2 or 3 minutes before they would even tell you their name. Interviewers want to see people that are fast thinkers, and can give a quick and accurate answer, not some one that hems and haws before they answer.

You may be nervous as h***, but try to not act this way. Confidence will get you more jobs than anything. Remember they are getting usually hundreds of applications for every good job. The strong confidant person, that thinks on their feet, and can quickly give good answers, is the one that is going to impress them and will get the job.

When you submit a cover letter and/or a resume, make it one that is tailored for that particular job you are applying for. Do a sales job, of why you are the right person for the job. That is rule #1 to get a job. Never, and I mean never, just send a boiler plate one size fits all resume, those are rejected without even being considered for an interview.
Were you hiring sales people? This advice would work if this is the case. Applying this to fields that do not require sales abilities may result in hiring confident but incompetent employees who are clueless to their own incompetence.

I have sympathy to those who are applying for jobs today. I thought the job market would open up as the baby boomers reach retirement age. Unfortunately, this is not happening.
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Old 01-11-2014, 04:09 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,475,905 times
Reputation: 4920
Quote:
Originally Posted by mshultz View Post
Were you hiring sales people? This advice would work if this is the case. Applying this to fields that do not require sales abilities may result in hiring confident but incompetent employees who are clueless to their own incompetence.

I have sympathy to those who are applying for jobs today. I thought the job market would open up as the baby boomers reach retirement age. Unfortunately, this is not happening.
Reread the first sentence. I bet he was in sales.

The information still applies to anybody getting a job. If somebody lacks confidence in their ability to perform a job, then they have lost the interview. The hiring manager will go with somebody that believes that they can do the job.
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Old 01-11-2014, 04:20 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
1,818 posts, read 2,202,427 times
Reputation: 2773
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangirl32 View Post
At least to me.
I feel like I'm selling myself, trying to convince someone else to hire me.

I have been looking for a year now. I have a job, but it is toxic to say the least. I'd post about that in a separate thread. It is so bad that I want to leave, but due to this economy, can't quit until I find something else.

Today I had an interview and right now I'm just exhausted. I am tired of applying and applying, getting only a handful of interviews and then nothing. Not sealing the deal.

Every time I go for an interview, I try to prepare well ahead of the time, research the company, have questions, dress nice, smile and be peppy, but it's so hard to keep getting disappointed over and over and over again.

At today's interview, I felt barraged with questions. It was almost like being questioned by a police officer. I am just exhausted. I want something to give.

I have a Masters in Business and good work experience, but it doesn't seem to be enough in today's world.

I know I'm venting, but I am just sad.
It's normal to be sad. But you have to accept that this is just how things are today, and if you carry a sad or disgruntled mindset into an interview, people will sense it and it will hurt your chances of getting the job. I know it sucks, but don't let it get the best of you.
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Old 01-11-2014, 05:10 PM
 
163 posts, read 411,211 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangirl32 View Post
At least to me.
I feel like I'm selling myself, trying to convince someone else to hire me.

I have been looking for a year now. I have a job, but it is toxic to say the least. I'd post about that in a separate thread. It is so bad that I want to leave, but due to this economy, can't quit until I find something else.

Today I had an interview and right now I'm just exhausted. I am tired of applying and applying, getting only a handful of interviews and then nothing. Not sealing the deal.

Every time I go for an interview, I try to prepare well ahead of the time, research the company, have questions, dress nice, smile and be peppy, but it's so hard to keep getting disappointed over and over and over again.

At today's interview, I felt barraged with questions. It was almost like being questioned by a police officer. I am just exhausted. I want something to give.

I have a Masters in Business and good work experience, but it doesn't seem to be enough in today's world.

I know I'm venting, but I am just sad.

I feel your pain. I don't have a job. I do know the feeling about working in a toxic place, though, as the place that ended up laying me off was so toxic it was literally making me sick.

Keep looking. Potential employers find you more valuable when you're already employed. When I had that toxic job, I was looking and I had so many interviews then when I got laid off, the interviews dramatically slowed down.
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Old 01-11-2014, 05:17 PM
 
8,980 posts, read 8,122,996 times
Reputation: 19502
It does not matter if you are being interviewed for a sales job, or for one in any other field. The person that walks in confident that they can do the job, answers questions quickly without hesitation, and acts like they will be able to do the job is the one that gets hired.

If you are a HM, you don't hire someone that comes in and acts unsure of themselves. Acts like they know they are not qualified and only applied because they are desperate does not get hired. Someone that cannot quickly answer questions does not get hired.

Yes you are selling yourself, when you apply for a job. Acting like you know you are the best person for the job they will find, gives you a foot up over anyone that lacks confidence in themselves, can hardly answer questions, etc.

A few years ago after I retired, my church asked me to help people get jobs. I would show them how to upgrade their resume, and change it to fit the different jobs, making their strongest points fit that particular job. Next they had to be taught to go to interviews, how to act, and how to be confident and to sell themselves to get the job. How not to waste their time putting in for jobs they were not qualified to perform.

Success rate. 100% over that 2 year period. They all got jobs in a very short time.

Yes, you have to be confident, answer questions quickly and fully as needed, and demonstrate you are the right person for the job, if you want the job. You are a salesperson, and your only goal is to sell the interviewer on you being the one that should get the job.

Fail to do that and you will not get the job. It does not mean just a job as a 6 figure salesperson, but a job at McDonald's, and everywhere in between.
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Old 01-11-2014, 05:24 PM
 
Location: MN
1,305 posts, read 1,410,515 times
Reputation: 1578
You can still do everything possible to sell yourself and you won't get a job. It gets disheartening after a while and heck, even depressing. My DWP does practice interviewing where they videotape you and go over it with you after. I could practice and practice and practice and the questions don't change much. I've been asked some rather wild interview questions (even illegal ones) and still had trouble getting a job.
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