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Old 01-11-2014, 07:48 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,464,316 times
Reputation: 4920

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
What area of the country do you live in? Because that's unusual advice. I worked for a Fortune 100 company for 18 years and I still deal with many professional companies on a freelance basis. I wouldn't think of going to a presentation in anything less than business casual, but to most places I wear what the youth today call "formal." Tech companies have been successful at making casual dress for work more prevalent. But in much of the country, under-dressing for interviews is still considered inappropriate. Location is a major factor. I would dress up more for Phoenix than Tucson. I would dress up more for Philadelphia than Phoenix.

I agree with the person who replied that the appropriate dress for an interview is what the top manager wears. If s/he wears business casual, fine. If s/he wears a suit, then a suit. Blue jeans and a T-shirt isn't appropriate attire unless you are interviewing to be a roadie.
I have worked in Dallas and Houston. The VP that apologized for my navy suit was for a job in Houston. The VP that recommended against a suit works for one of the five largest banks in the country. In my job, I work regularly with SVPs, VPs, and AVPs. I also get to interview prospective employees. I look for a clean pair of slacks/chinos and a collared shirt in my candidates. If they wear a tie without a suit, it's just wrong. We just want people that qualify for the job and are dressed in business casual, as you mentioned. We aren't looking for fashion models.

At previous employers, the management only wore suits for meeting investors or the media. Otherwise, they wore slacks and a buttoned shirt with a collar.

Last edited by move4ward; 01-11-2014 at 08:02 PM..
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Old 01-11-2014, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Redmond, WA
559 posts, read 717,998 times
Reputation: 748
Quote:
Originally Posted by move4ward View Post
Hahahaha. Yeah right. You lose out more often than winning. The rule is to NOT wear a suit, unless told otherwise.

Even at Fortune 500 companies, most people would look overdressed and stiff. I have interviewed at Fortune 500 companies. The interviewers are usually in chinos. If the interview is on Friday, they are in jeans and polo shirt. This includes interviews with VPs and AVPs.

I know a VP at a "too big to fail bank". He thinks candidates are going over the top with a suit. This is one of the largest banks in the country.
I agree that this notion is beginning to become more commonplace. I interviewed in a suit a couple of months ago and even the receptionist joked that the only people seen in the place in that kind of attire are job candidates and I immediately felt out of place. Another manager once told me I could take off the tie because "there was nobody to impress around here".

I'm a machinist and familiar with the blue collar dilemma and have gone through the same internal debate. Go with your gut. After researching the firm and even better, whom you'll be meeting, only then make a final judgement call.

From one blue collar worker to another, I know that we have a tendency to look like we just rolled out of bed when we get to work at the ungodly hour of 4:00am and nobody, not even the foreman or onsite office staff will care, but shelf the scruffy look while job hunting. The advice I always got from the contractors when the debate came up was to go one notch higher than what you'll be expected to wear on the job. A nicer pair of jeans, workboots, and hoody are perfectly acceptable for industrial/construction positions. But no prints/words, holes, or 3 day stubble. Be clean and smell good. Keep tobacco products out of sight. And act professional, save conversation regarding "guy stuff" for after you get hired.
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Old 01-11-2014, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Princeton
1,078 posts, read 1,122,941 times
Reputation: 2137
Blue collar is blue collar, when sitting down with "any" manager, carry yourself with confidence, blue collar= pair of dark dockers, polo shirt/collared shirt and sport jacket is fine. Now if your sitting down with the manager of Marriott International, you dress sharp, black suit, white dress shirt and tie. Your a professional, let your resume and your confidence do the rest..
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Old 01-11-2014, 11:15 PM
 
Location: H-Tine, Texas
6,742 posts, read 4,123,616 times
Reputation: 8528
Quote:
Originally Posted by move4ward View Post
The only time that I was commented on by my interview attire was by a VP. I was dressed in a navy suit and tie. He apologized that I showed up in a suit. All the employers were in casual clothes, thirts etc. It was a slight distraction during the interview. I still nailed the job.

I have interviewed candidates. I don't care about the suit either way. If you wear an ironed shirt and slacks, then you are in. We aren't looking for fashion models dressed in tight European suits for the corporate office. We just don't want unkempt slobs applying for positions.

It's not just my opinion. I have asked other VPs and AVPs, also. The suit will not detract in a corporate environment, but it could certainly hurt a candidate in a blue collar or front line environment.
I have interviewed candidates, as well. And although wearing a suit didn't automatically get them a job, it left a more favorable impression over me than the person who didn't wear a suit.

And that's fine, you and those others can have their opinion - I will have mine.

I only interview/work for white collar environments, so I don't care what anyone says, I will wear my Euro suits, even if the interview is on casual Friday.

I guess it's different in a blue collar environment, but for someone to possible not get the job because they 'overdressed', or be disqualified based on such, then that's ridiculous.
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Old 01-12-2014, 07:03 AM
 
Location: The Northeast - hoping one day the Northwest!
1,107 posts, read 1,128,608 times
Reputation: 1003
Depending on what type of job it is, I feel wearing a suit is too much. I personally do not even own one! I do administrative work for a law firm. I wore business casual clothes to the interview. Probably just black pants, and one of my favorite shirts. In my opinion, the only time professional business clothes is important is if you are applying to a manager/supervisor or executive job. Any other job, I think business casual is perfect.
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Old 01-12-2014, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Temporarily, in Limerick
2,898 posts, read 5,201,188 times
Reputation: 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
Dress in a suit, unless otherwise told to wear something else.
I completely agree because there are a lot of options between GQ/Armani style dressing & a brown tweed suit jacket. Tailoring up or down is what needs to be done, not forgoing the suit all together. One can always remove a suit jacket once inside if completely overdressed (men or women), but showing up in a suit shows respect for the company & interviewer & taking your job seriously. I think most HR reps would suggest the same.
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Old 01-12-2014, 09:11 AM
 
Location: West of Louisiana, East of New Mexico
2,535 posts, read 2,024,840 times
Reputation: 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
What area of the country do you live in? Because that's unusual advice. I worked for a Fortune 100 company for 18 years and I still deal with many professional companies on a freelance basis. I wouldn't think of going to a presentation in anything less than business casual, but to most places I wear what the youth today call "formal." Tech companies have been successful at making casual dress for work more prevalent. But in much of the country, under-dressing for interviews is still considered inappropriate. Location is a major factor. I would dress up more for Phoenix than Tucson. I would dress up more for Philadelphia than Phoenix.

I agree with the person who replied that the appropriate dress for an interview is what the top manager wears. If s/he wears business casual, fine. If s/he wears a suit, then a suit. Blue jeans and a T-shirt isn't appropriate attire unless you are interviewing to be a roadie.

I work for a top-5 insurance company. Rank and file employees wear business casual Monday through Thursday and jeans on Friday. Our managers (from our Senior Manager up to the CFO) wear business formal at all times. I agree that you're better off over dressing than under dressing. I wore a suit for my interview. Good thing, because my three interviewers were all managers over age 50. No way I get the job if I dressed down.
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Old 01-12-2014, 02:08 PM
 
17,000 posts, read 20,665,159 times
Reputation: 33987
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATG5 View Post
I have interviewed candidates, as well. And although wearing a suit didn't automatically get them a job, it left a more favorable impression over me than the person who didn't wear a suit.

And that's fine, you and those others can have their opinion - I will have mine.

I only interview/work for white collar environments, so I don't care what anyone says, I will wear my Euro suits, even if the interview is on casual Friday.

I guess it's different in a blue collar environment, but for someone to possible not get the job because they 'overdressed', or be disqualified based on such, then that's ridiculous.
Exactly, it also shows extra effort on their part, which could also be an indicator of how important getting the job is to them, and be a reflection of their work ethic.

And it is better to "overdress" any day than to "underdress" in any situation.

Again, once you get the job you can dress like everyone else.
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Old 01-12-2014, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
4,798 posts, read 6,118,413 times
Reputation: 3733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Challenger76 View Post
Depends on the job. I wore nice slacks, a button down tucked in (which I felt like a total dork doing), and nice dress shoes. The lady who interviewed me looked at me like I was overdressed. It was a factory job.
Metallica shirt and ripped up jeans may have got me the job
Are people such slobs these days that tucking in a shirt requires a huge amount of effort?
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Old 01-12-2014, 04:38 PM
 
Location: H-Tine, Texas
6,742 posts, read 4,123,616 times
Reputation: 8528
Quote:
Originally Posted by seain dublin View Post
Exactly, it also shows extra effort on their part, which could also be an indicator of how important getting the job is to them, and be a reflection of their work ethic.

And it is better to "overdress" any day than to "underdress" in any situation.

Again, once you get the job you can dress like everyone else.
I thought what you posted was one of those things that was obvious and goes without saying...apparently not.

If I was ever denied an opportunity for a job because I was overdressed, then I wouldn't want to work for such company.
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