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Old 01-15-2014, 09:26 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,770,900 times
Reputation: 16146

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Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
Thank you letters matter. Not doing it means that you do not understands the rules and mandatory courtesies of business, and that is a problem.
I'm a hiring manager. I don't care if someone sends in a thank you letter. At all. Unless they have spelling issues. I have never sent one after an interview.

Clearly your use of the word mandatory is not correct.
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:49 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,033 posts, read 20,349,383 times
Reputation: 22759
Default No, she does not

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tober138 View Post
Does the daughter think people in corporate positions are "idiots" for not doing their day to day correspondence by handwritten notes and using e-mail instead?
See #57 above
Perfect response
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Old 01-15-2014, 10:07 PM
 
Location: here
24,839 posts, read 30,089,193 times
Reputation: 32406
How many of you poo pooing thank you notes have ever been on an interview panel?
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Old 01-15-2014, 10:13 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
2,279 posts, read 3,926,860 times
Reputation: 4008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibbiekat View Post
How many of you poo pooing thank you notes have ever been on an interview panel?
Several times. I've other been a hiring manager and I get drafted into hiring panels several times a year.
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Old 01-16-2014, 03:10 AM
 
Location: We have 4 seasons
4 posts, read 2,702 times
Reputation: 14
I send them a few business days after the interview to remind them I'm be the only candidate they should be considering.

All jokes aside, I don't believe in same-day or next day. Allow some breathing room. You want them to check their email right after interviewing some other individual and remember how wonderful you were, apart from the notes they took on you.
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Old 01-16-2014, 03:56 AM
 
12,299 posts, read 15,196,725 times
Reputation: 8108
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
I have never turned in a thank you letter, I have thanked the people I have interviewed with in the flesh. Why thank them and shake their hands after the interview to sit there and email them a phony thank you letter?

Thank you letters are often just glanced at and then the interview with you may be remembered. IF there is a huge candidate pool then yes it would be wise to email one following the interview, probably the day after. IF the candidate pool is small, then I doubt it would make a difference.

In STEM positions, they really want experience and education, personality is a key player as well, not who is more polite.
Except many STEM candidates are poor at writing and may not be experts in manners. Sending one could be the competitive edge.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:29 AM
 
Location: Texas
43,557 posts, read 52,667,627 times
Reputation: 70811
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathGreetsMeWarm View Post
I met with a career counselor today. She was really pushing the thank-you letter thing. In fact, she said I could email one or send it in the mail. Not sure which century she's from. I'm trying not to be obstinate, but I just don't see how a thank-you letter helps. Do you think a business that interviews you is going to think, "We really liked that guy. He seems smart, reliable, and has the experience we're looking for. But since he didn't send us a thank-you note for interviewing him, I think we'll go with someone else." ??? I'm guessing that most hiring managers just roll their eyes at thank-you emails and in fact the candidate looks worse because now he/she looks to be trying to courier favor or play on emotions. Maybe it helps in some sectors, like maybe Sales, but I doubt it does for technical roles, where skills are all that matter.
Is this a new generation thing?
Only pathetic, needy, desperate people bother to have manners?
When I hire, I notice all sorts of the "little things." It says so much about the person.
And send a CARD (unless it's unclear if they will get it - big organization, mail could get lost easily) to EACH interviewer. Otherwise email.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:20 AM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 8,641,790 times
Reputation: 6514
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Except many STEM candidates are poor at writing and may not be experts in manners. Sending one could be the competitive edge.
STEM candidates often have MS degrees, and are published. There are poor writers yes, but for the most part many of them are good. I received a very high score on the GRE writing portion, and I have several publications. I write proposals and reports that are delivered to clients almost weekly.

I will agree, many are anti-social or socially awkward.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:22 AM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 8,641,790 times
Reputation: 6514
Given all these replies I believe I will start sending thank you letters. I have never sent one before, but like many have stated, it seems to be the trend and it will not hurt to do so.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:25 AM
 
20,126 posts, read 11,162,288 times
Reputation: 20153
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
STEM candidates often have MS degrees, and are published. There are poor writers yes, but for the most part many of them are good. I received a very high score on the GRE writing portion, and I have several publications. I write proposals and reports that are delivered to clients almost weekly.

I will agree, many are anti-social or socially awkward.
I have found that academic writing experience is not an indicator of a good business writer. In fact, academic writing is "negative training" for business expository requirements. A thank-you note may not tell me much about that, but when the field is broad and the opportunity is small, every discriminating factor helps.
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