U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-16-2014, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Chicago
2,883 posts, read 4,038,233 times
Reputation: 2745

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by greywar View Post
So lets say you interview, and they email you afterwards saying you did not get the position.

Send a thank you note for their time and consideration, reiterate that if another position comes open to please consider you.

We went to hire someone a one place I work, told everyone else they werent hired....a week later...the guy we hired backed out. We remembered a nice thank you email, and looked at that guy again rather then start the process over.

Yes its worth the time.
I just this week was in a similar situation although I hadn't had the interview yet. I applied for a position. The ad said that they would reply to all applicants. I got an email stating that they were sorry, but they weren't going to offer an interview. I replied asking for feedback on my cover letter and resume if it wasn't too much of an imposition. They responded back that they had reconsidered and would offer me an interview. I'm having the interview next week!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-16-2014, 06:56 AM
 
131 posts, read 179,403 times
Reputation: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaBurgh View Post
A well-timed thank you note can be strategic. I would send them in an email approximately 48 hours after the interview so that my name resurfaces amongst the pool of applicants. An enthusiastic thank you letter can demonstrate your passion for the work, interest in the position, and touch on points that you may have forgot to make in the interview.

Your counselor is 100% correct
This^. Using information you gathered at the interview, you can use the letter to highlight why you are the ideal candidate for the position.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2014, 07:26 AM
 
8,199 posts, read 6,135,837 times
Reputation: 11736
Quote:
Originally Posted by move4ward View Post
I have interviewed a few candidates. Some have sent thank you emails. The word desperate did not come to mind. It was a business etiquette.

As for the usefulness of the letters, it did not change my decision at all.
Yep, and I wouldn't normally expect it to. The only time it MIGHT make a difference is in situations where all other things are equal, but those are rare.

The way I look at is is that a thank-you letter is simply evidence that the candidate understands the norms and etiquette of the professional environment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2014, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Georgia
4,562 posts, read 4,101,724 times
Reputation: 15768
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
I disagree, if you type a thank you letter and have typos or use poor grammar it will hurt you. It's the same reason some people do not do Cover Letters. The thinking here is, the more you put down in writing on paper the more chances you have at making errors and thus people just skip it. Obviously it should not be hard to write a few paragraphs without errors, but you'd be surprised. The smallest simplest letter could destroy your chances.

Well, if you are TYPING a note, then yeah, you're already two notches down on the politeness scale, anyway.

How about this: Write carefully and don't make any mistakes. Have it proofread by someone competent, if you are unsure. This isn't an essay -- it's a 4-5 sentence acknowledgement of gratitude for time spent. And if mistakes DO make a difference, there's a very real possibility that this isn't the job for you, anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2014, 09:57 AM
 
136 posts, read 142,821 times
Reputation: 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Is this a new generation thing?
Only pathetic, needy, desperate people bother to have manners?
I've always had great manners. Right before I leave a face-to-face interview, I always tell the person interviewing me that I'm grateful for he/she taking the time to interview me and that I hope it was informative. I send thank-you notes to the people who send me Christmas presents, to people who treat me to dinner, and in other types of exchanges with friends and family. But with friends and family there are no drawbacks to potentially being perceived as overly nice. A job interview is essentially a business exchange, and in the business world it arouses suspicion when someone tries to be overly nice, to courier favor or to seem to be compensating in any way. A lot of people try to be nice to compensate for lack of skills. I don't want to be one of those guys. I'd rather be someone who has demonstrable skills that make anyone want to hire him on the spot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2014, 11:52 AM
 
282 posts, read 352,103 times
Reputation: 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
Thank-you notes are basic etiquette in the job-interview scene. With two equally qualified candidates, that thank-you note could be the tipping point. For a manager who is concerned with putting together a cohesive team and maintaining a pleasant workplace, the thank-you note could be very important. And it is a chance to show that you understand the job and the culture of that particular workplace.

"Skills" are rarely all that is considered when a person is hired. One toxic personality can up-end an entire office.
"Skills" are rarely considered at all. You get hired based on whether the hiring person likes you or not. If they don't like you then you don't get the job. Everything you've ever been told is a lie. No one cares if you're smart or good at what you do. All they care is if you're good looking and if they like you or not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2014, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Long Neck,De
4,792 posts, read 6,797,636 times
Reputation: 4768
Look at it this way.. It can not hurt.It let's them know you care AND brings your name up again in front of the hiring manager. So ..Why noy?? It doesn't cost anything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2014, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,011 posts, read 8,429,998 times
Reputation: 15617
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathGreetsMeWarm View Post
A job interview is essentially a business exchange, and in the business world it arouses suspicion when someone tries to be overly nice...
What kind of jobs are you applying for? Hitman? Mob enforcer? Bieber's bodyguard?

Competence, skill and experience are all important. So is work ethic. So are people skills.

From your posts I can't tell anything about the first four qualities, but I know you don't possess the last one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2014, 01:50 PM
 
8,199 posts, read 6,135,837 times
Reputation: 11736
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalSun View Post
"Skills" are rarely considered at all. You get hired based on whether the hiring person likes you or not. If they don't like you then you don't get the job. Everything you've ever been told is a lie. No one cares if you're smart or good at what you do. All they care is if you're good looking and if they like you or not.
Maybe that's how it is in SoCal, but not in the places where I have worked. I would always choose the ugly, skilled person over the pretty, worthless one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2014, 01:57 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,433,702 times
Reputation: 5453
Quote:
Originally Posted by War Beagle View Post
Yep, and I wouldn't normally expect it to. The only time it MIGHT make a difference is in situations where all other things are equal, but those are rare.

The way I look at is is that a thank-you letter is simply evidence that the candidate understands the norms and etiquette of the professional environment.
The other way to look at this is from the psychology of memory. The more times a person is exposed to something, the more likely they are to remember it. The more a person sees your name (without being annoying), the more likely they are to remember details about you later on. Little things like thank you notes put you further towards an interviewer remembering you specifically when looking at notes from all of the interviews.

This is called the rule of 'effective frequency' in marketing/social psychology, and a job interview is nothing more than you putting out a marketing pitch of yourself. The general rule is we don't remember something being marketed to us until we see it seven times. I view thank you emails as a tool to increase my expose in marketing myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top