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Old 01-14-2014, 09:39 PM
 
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I would love to hear from anyone who has had experience with case studies in an interview.

I have an interview later this week that will include 30 minutes allotted for a case study exercise. I've googled and have a general idea what it's about but I'd appreciate any advice from someone who's been there. If it makes any difference, this is a written case study.

I'm worried about the math because it's been years since I've used it, but I've brushed up on basics that were recommended online.

Any insight?
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Old 01-15-2014, 07:23 AM
 
4,544 posts, read 4,726,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the minx View Post
I would love to hear from anyone who has had experience with case studies in an interview.

I have an interview later this week that will include 30 minutes allotted for a case study exercise. I've googled and have a general idea what it's about but I'd appreciate any advice from someone who's been there. If it makes any difference, this is a written case study.

I'm worried about the math because it's been years since I've used it, but I've brushed up on basics that were recommended online.

Any insight?
I've both developed and taken case studies. It will usually be job related and very relevant to the day-to-day tasks.

The one I took was for a job as a consultant. I was asked to review a proposal for an organization for 10 minutes and then have a conversation with the supposed author of the proposal discussing the pros and cons of the proposal and what my thoughts were on best steps moving forward. It had to do with the legality and science of using a particular method to hire employees.

I've also developed several for an analytics role in financial modeling. These were focused on understanding compounding interest and what impact micro and macro economic factors may have on changes in insurance payouts/claims over several years.

If you can review the job description and have a good idea of what the job requires on a day-to-day basis you will be able to pinpoint what they are likely to ask you about.
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Old 01-15-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,772 posts, read 54,408,375 times
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The last time I did one to fill a position, it was 20 minutes, and the math involved was what I thought to be very simple "do it in your head" without the use of a calculator or computer. Unfortunately several people didn't know that a building divided into 4 rental spaces adds up to 100%.

The best way to prepare is to pretend you are the hiring manager and try to figure out several/many examples of what they might be looking for. With any luck you'll hit on one of them and be well prepared.
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:47 AM
 
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Although I've only had verbal or computerized ones, they are going to be relevant to your job and are meant to understand your situational thought process. Some case studies have right and wrong answers; some are more to see how you approach situations and tasks. This one appears to also want to test your writing and communications ability as well. Unless it's for an analytical position, the math is typically straightforward, if any.

I enjoy case interviews more than any other type of interview both as a candidate and as a hiring manager. I definitely find them more insightful than "Tell me about a time...." interviews, which are typically stories that are about 50% true anyway and can be easily coached. They're also more applicable than the "How many windows are in Manhattan?" questions.

They all have their place, but case interviews typically give both sides the best picture of whether or not job and candidate are a good fit. Good luck
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