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Old 01-15-2014, 06:41 AM
 
193 posts, read 487,329 times
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I've read all the online stuff about negotiating a higher salary, having research to back it up, being diplomatic but polite about it, all that crap.

But one thing I haven't seen is HOW to react when they initially come across with the offer that is less than you were hoping for.

Do you ASK if it's a negotiable number, or is that weird to ask?

Do you originally just say something like, "OK" or nod your head and wait until a bit later to start negotiating? Or do you come right out and say that it's less than you were expecting and begin negotiations then?

Thanks.
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Old 01-15-2014, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,103 posts, read 4,270,883 times
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I dont think theres a general answer to this issue. Hiring managers are people, and people are unpredictable.
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Old 01-15-2014, 07:33 AM
 
15,353 posts, read 17,594,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freedom125 View Post

Do you ASK if it's a negotiable number, or is that weird to ask?


Thanks.
I never ask if it's negotiable. Instead, I wait for the right time in the conversation(usually as soon as they give the number) and say "Could you increase the starting salary to $xx?". Another option is "I want to check on increasing the starting salary to $xx". Then stay silent and wait for an answer. If the rate is a lot lower than market rate, you can mention that as your first sentence before you ask about increasing the salary/pay rate.

Be prepared to sell why you are worth more if the discussion goes in that direction.

I successfully negotiated higher pay several times with the above method. Also got extra paid vacation.
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Old 01-15-2014, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Idaho
836 posts, read 1,376,202 times
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Not unusual for employer to low ball their offer.

I like sware's advice; if they won't raise pay ask if they can add x days off or whatever benefit you like. Some people can't raise the money offer but have flexibility in other areas.

Or say "If you can do $x i will commit to 6 months or a year here" to remind them you can always jump ship for more money.

And they should respect that
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Old 01-15-2014, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,788 posts, read 13,274,979 times
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You can try to negotiate but usually the choice is take it and keep looking for something better, or decline it and hold out for something better. I've had to walk away from offers numerous times that were in the neighborhood of $15 an hour.
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,068 posts, read 5,316,539 times
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Any salary negotiations I have been involved with have at least started with a pay range over email. So they would say something like we are looking to pay $50K to $58K. I at least get the "range" before I enter the interview.

A couple of times the actual salary number has been discussed during the interview otherwise it has come over via the form of an offer letter after. In either of those cases, I wouldn't be surprised if they offer me $50K (low ball) since they are obviously testing the waters to see if I accept. I haven't yet accepted the low end offer. I rehearse at home prior to the interview what I am going to say to help prove my worth if they go below a certain amount. You have to sell yourself so that means don't give in. Don't say "Do you think you can go higher?" with a sad look of desperation on your face. Instead figure out WHY you think you are worth the high/middle end offer.

Worst case, if they won't budge out of the low end offer, try to discuss more vacation time or stock options or annual incentives (bonus). Get creative with the offer. The more you're willing to work with them the more likely they are to give in on something.
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:19 AM
 
15,353 posts, read 17,594,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiGuy2.5 View Post
Any salary negotiations I have been involved with have at least started with a pay range over email. So they would say something like we are looking to pay $50K to $58K. I at least get the "range" before I enter the interview.

A couple of times the actual salary number has been discussed during the interview otherwise it has come over via the form of an offer letter after. In either of those cases, I wouldn't be surprised if they offer me $50K (low ball) since they are obviously testing the waters to see if I accept. I haven't yet accepted the low end offer. I rehearse at home prior to the interview what I am going to say to help prove my worth if they go below a certain amount. You have to sell yourself so that means don't give in. Don't say "Do you think you can go higher?" with a sad look of desperation on your face. Instead figure out WHY you think you are worth the high/middle end offer.

Worst case, if they won't budge out of the low end offer, try to discuss more vacation time or stock options or annual incentives (bonus). Get creative with the offer. The more you're willing to work with them the more likely they are to give in on something.
Rarely will the official offer/salary take place during the interview. They interview you first to decide if they want to offer the job to you. The official 'this is it' pay rate is given to you when they decided YOU are the one and they formally offer you the job.

However, if the job interview has been arranged via a 3rd party recruiter, pay discussion usually occur at the front end because they submit your resume along with the agreed upon pay rate. So the third party contracting firm 'recruiter' process is done totally different than for a standard perm job.

I found that very small companies (<100 employees) are more likely to talk salary during the last part of the interview. The mid to larger companies don't discuss salary during the interview unless it's a general range. They usually wait until the formal job offer.
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:49 AM
 
Location: JobHuntingHacker.com
928 posts, read 860,658 times
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That is a very very good question. I work in sales and experience negotiations and low ball offers daily. First of all, don't take it personally. Any company will try to negotiate the best price for their hires, just like every employee would like to negotiate the highest salary. It works like this, they offer you X and you are thinking Y, most likely you will meet halfways at Z.

To get back to your question. React with a "flinch". Something like "ummm, not sure about that" or "oh.....hmmmm ok, let's see", or just reacting a little bit with amazement and saying "I see, however I had a different number in mind, let's see what we can do about that".

The reasoning behind this is that the company is throwing a number out there to see if it will stick. If you don't flinch or don't say anything, they will actually assume that you agree with that number. If you do flinch, typically they will try to come up with a higher offer (still not the most you can get). At this time, it may be a good idea to tell them your counter offer. They will probably react negatively as well and you will be willing to concede, etc. until you reach a number you are both happy with.
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Colorado
4,308 posts, read 11,798,947 times
Reputation: 4425
In the past I have, as politely as possible, asked if there's "any wiggle room on that?" If they said no, I've said that's fine, I just felt I should ask. Thankfully so far nobody's rescinded a job offer because of my question. I think people should be able to ask without worrying as long as they know how to handle a negative answer.
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Old 01-15-2014, 10:01 AM
 
Location: JobHuntingHacker.com
928 posts, read 860,658 times
Reputation: 1825
Asking if there is any "wiggle room" is weak. What do you think they will say: "Sure there is, we are actually prepared to pay 15% more than our initial offer, but we just wanted to see if you will be stupid enough to take it". Or more likely "no, not really" or at the very best "Maybe a little, but not really much more than that".

Reach like someone just pushed you on the train and say that you had a different number in mind for this position given your experience and skills. Then state your counteroffer.
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