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Old 01-17-2014, 11:46 AM
 
1,210 posts, read 1,387,077 times
Reputation: 1561

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Does this factor in to how any of you view applicant at all, or am I again overthinking things and no one would care? Does fall under the "personality" category?

In a job environment where everyone wears a suit everyday, the applicant has "better" clothes than you. "Better" in quotation marks.

I've run into this at networking events and informational lunch/dinner/social event chats with power players (as a future prospective applicant, I'm still getting my Master's of Science degree full time).

The example would be, say you are wearing a nice, tailored 1k suit, with a belt, no cufflinks, decorative sleeve buttons and a 1k watch. The applicant has a 3k bespoke suit, a 5k watch, 1k cufflinks, suspenders, and functional sleeve buttons, as everyday attire.

I've read that always wearing more expensive attire than potential co-workers, your potential supervisor, and the boss could be met with rage; but I have never seen this in reality. I have seen this manifest itself out in public however.
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Old 01-17-2014, 11:48 AM
 
2,098 posts, read 1,862,755 times
Reputation: 2685
While I agree with not telling an employer you need a job during an interview, everything else is way too nitpicky.
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Old 01-17-2014, 12:02 PM
 
Location: JobHuntingHacker.com
928 posts, read 863,074 times
Reputation: 1825
Some people who are in position to hiring are on a little powertrip.
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Old 01-17-2014, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,820 posts, read 13,312,939 times
Reputation: 15995
Quote:
Originally Posted by Staggerlee666 View Post
Most people who are in position to hiring are on a big powertrip.
fixed
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Old 01-17-2014, 12:20 PM
 
2,283 posts, read 3,114,907 times
Reputation: 3664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mighty_Pelican View Post
Does this factor in to how any of you view applicant at all, or am I again overthinking things and no one would care? Does fall under the "personality" category?

In a job environment where everyone wears a suit everyday, the applicant has "better" clothes than you. "Better" in quotation marks.

I've run into this at networking events and informational lunch/dinner/social event chats with power players (as a future prospective applicant, I'm still getting my Master's of Science degree full time).

The example would be, say you are wearing a nice, tailored 1k suit, with a belt, no cufflinks, decorative sleeve buttons and a 1k watch. The applicant has a 3k bespoke suit, a 5k watch, 1k cufflinks, suspenders, and functional sleeve buttons, as everyday attire.

I've read that always wearing more expensive attire than potential co-workers, your potential supervisor, and the boss could be met with rage; but I have never seen this in reality. I have seen this manifest itself out in public however.
"Met with rage"? Uh, no - not even close.

Even a factor? No - in fact, there's such a small percentage of the population that would even recognize the difference that it would be totally insignificant.

That said, if the guy wearing $8K in clothing walked into the Best Buy to apply, he'd probably be met with laughs - even a full suit would probably be overkill.
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Old 01-17-2014, 12:47 PM
 
Location: FLG/PHX/MKE
7,288 posts, read 13,514,423 times
Reputation: 11576
I get it--interviewing people is exhausting. It's especially exhausting when you have to do it over and over, and have a steady stream of really bad candidates who clearly don't fit the role. When this happens, though, it's almost always a result of a defective job posting.

Hiring in technology and management, which I have done for a very long time, has the potential to be overwhelming, as it probably does in any field that requires a sophisticated suite of skills. Posting a job ad for a fantasy candidate is sure to disappoint, the same as posting a generalization. The former generates a huge number of custom-tailored resumes from wishful applicants who know very well that the person has no chance of ever finding a candidate who meets all the supposedly "mandatory" criteria. The latter generates a dump truck full of sloppy resumes from stay at home dilettantes who are just throwing resumes up in the air and waiting for them to stick to a passing job. I suggest you review your job posting to help weed out some people who are not hitting the mark and causing you unnecessary irritation.

In addition to that, some of your original post is rather indulgent, if not contrived. I'm not sure what value laughing at a candidate sitting in the parking lot brings to your overall evaluation. When your opinions are already formed in the parking lot, it might be time to think about revisiting your role as an interviewer.

In reality, rather than monitoring the parking lot with a stopwatch and laughing at the people who are sitting in their cars, your time might be better spent "fixing the weakness" that is your persistent misuse of commas. That probably comes off as rather petty, but it is a weakness, and to use your example, you should be interested in fixing it.
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Old 01-17-2014, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Oakland, California
313 posts, read 411,137 times
Reputation: 627
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTRdad View Post
Do not take interviewing advice from your teachers/professors
Who should I take interviewing advice from? The internet? Neither of my parents have ever interviewed for a job once in the past 30 years.
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Old 01-17-2014, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Nassau, Long Island, NY
16,408 posts, read 28,916,147 times
Reputation: 7273
The most ridiculous post I ever read on CD on this subject was the one from the person who would walk the job candidate to their car in the parking lot at the end of the interview because she wanted to snoop and see how clean the candidate's car was as part of the candidate's "assessment" as being fit for the job. Yes, someone who claimed to be a "hiring manager" actually posted that! (And, no, she was not recruiting people for jobs where they had to drive clients around in their own cars!)
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Old 01-17-2014, 01:50 PM
 
3,351 posts, read 3,056,086 times
Reputation: 4885
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadWarrior12 View Post
And the OP only said that personality was important. Not that they needed to be a "drinking buddy" - you're the one that threw that in there.

For many roles, personality and likeability are very important. Many of the jobs I hire for have a heavy team contributor component - in these, a peer panel interview is used to weed out those that get past the phone screen stage. If the rest of the team likes them from a personality and functional ability standpoint, they move on to the final interview with me.

Solves the vast majority of the interpersonal conflict drama that represents 25% of the threads on this forum, and gives my employees somewhat of a vested interest in the new hire's success. Not many of them hang out together after work, but the office environment is highly engaged and not sidetracked by petty political games.

So, yes, personality is important.

The same is true in our group. Everyone will have the same skills/education so it comes down to whether they will fit in with the team.
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Old 01-17-2014, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,768 posts, read 4,645,151 times
Reputation: 4899
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
So people who do "know everything" are never allowed to change jobs?
Let me put it this way the next time I meet someone who knows everything about accounting and taxes will be the 1st time. There are thousands upon thousands of pages of IRS rules, regulations, and court rulings. The good accountants understand they do not know everything, and are willing to speak with other accountants, and no where to do the research on the questions that they do not have the answers too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mighty_Pelican View Post
Does this factor in to how any of you view applicant at all, or am I again overthinking things and no one would care? Does fall under the "personality" category?

In a job environment where everyone wears a suit everyday, the applicant has "better" clothes than you. "Better" in quotation marks.

I've run into this at networking events and informational lunch/dinner/social event chats with power players (as a future prospective applicant, I'm still getting my Master's of Science degree full time).

The example would be, say you are wearing a nice, tailored 1k suit, with a belt, no cufflinks, decorative sleeve buttons and a 1k watch. The applicant has a 3k bespoke suit, a 5k watch, 1k cufflinks, suspenders, and functional sleeve buttons, as everyday attire.

I've read that always wearing more expensive attire than potential co-workers, your potential supervisor, and the boss could be met with rage; but I have never seen this in reality. I have seen this manifest itself out in public however.
Personally I will notice when someone is wearing a nice suit, but I have never held it against someone. when I hired sales people that pointed to them being guys who were used to making money, in accounting it really means nothing to me.
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