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Old 01-28-2014, 06:56 AM
 
11,636 posts, read 20,442,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
I have a sneaking suspicion the OP doesn't actually own a suit.

Even if the office environment is casual, you wear a suit to the interview because it shows that you are taking it seriously and that it means enough to you to dress up.

And what it the days you were there previously just happened to be random casual days? Stranger things have happened.

Dress up to get in, then adapt to the office dress code AFTER you're hired.
I agree that generally you dress up for the interview and then adapt to the office dress code. However, if whatever he wore to the first two interviews was sufficient to get him a third interview I would advise him to dress the way he dressed to the first two interviews.

I don't know how you would jump to the conclusion that he doesn't own a suit based on what he wrote.
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Old 01-28-2014, 07:00 AM
 
2,118 posts, read 3,863,580 times
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After doing lots of interviewing, I don't notice what anyone wears any more. Pretty much everyone blurs in to one. I doubt you could dress poorly enough to stand out in a bad way.

If they cared about finding the best fit for the position, and unless the position calls for a suit, it's not necessary.

And if there is an HR department, it is ok to ask what to wear.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
43,253 posts, read 41,828,694 times
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Because he said he owned plenty of "business professional" clothes but never said "suit."

If not a suit, at least wear a jacket/blazer.
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Old 01-28-2014, 09:55 AM
 
1,191 posts, read 1,535,713 times
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I would wear a suit. Lots of places are fine with things going a bit more casual once you're hired and on the job. However the suit is about making a professional first impression. I think something totally different when I first glimpse a groomed man in a well-fitted suit, versus a man in khakis and a button down, versus a man in jeans and a t-shirt, versus a man who looks like wandered out of the local homeless encampment.

Are first impressions always right? Absolutely not. The scruffy guy could have the best mind for the job. But part of interviewing is giving off the right impression. Better to start with them thinking you're a pro and go from there than to have them start off thinking, "Yeah, I have no idea" and go from there. You want to set things up in your favor right off the bat.
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Old 01-28-2014, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Ayrsley
4,714 posts, read 8,477,387 times
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If its a corporate gig and they have not said anything otherwise (such as, "it is ok to dress buisness casual"), then wear a suit.

Its a no-brainer, even if the company has more relaxed dress policy intrernally. Once you get hired, you can ditch the jacket and tie.
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Old 01-28-2014, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,904 posts, read 6,118,463 times
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Lots of good points made here and I enjoyed reading this thread, very much. I think the idea of going with what he is comfortable with is a good one. If a suit, as someone said, ask if is okay to remove your jacket during the interview.

I went on an interview once to a very large company and I dressed business professional (female). I was coming from my current job after work. The interviewer informed me during the interview that they dressed very casually on the job. I got the impression he didn't like the suit look......but, my other company did. I didn't care one way or the other.

It's a crap shoot. Go with your gut feelings and hope for the best.
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Old 01-28-2014, 11:29 AM
 
285 posts, read 638,383 times
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Always wear a suit. The person interviewing you may take offense that you didn't give them the respect that you would give to others.
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Old 01-28-2014, 11:37 AM
 
17,002 posts, read 20,676,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkram View Post
I would not be meeting with clients in my position, and when I was last at the office I saw several people engaged in a video conference with prospective clients. None of them wore a suit, and some of them were even in sales.

You don't have the job yet. So it doesn't matter what they're wearing. After you get hired you can dress exactly like them.

Unless you're specifically instructed to say wear business casual, you wear a suit.

Think of it as how you would act if you were a guest in someone's home that you don't know really well. You tend to be a little neater in the bathroom, make your bed in the morning, don't go into the refrigerator unless they say help yourself, you're on your best behavior.

You're a guest at the company, so it is better to be overdressed than underdressed.

What would you do if the person you're meeting with who you have seen in photos online in business casual decides to wear a suit the day of your interview?

And you're sitting there underdressed.
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Old 01-28-2014, 12:44 PM
 
3,565 posts, read 1,874,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wry_Martini View Post
Based on how you described the office and the dress code, I wouldn't wear the suit. You'll risk giving the wrong impression -- you might come across as stuffy, inflexible, out of touch, and a bad fit with the corporate culture.

Nice pants, a button down shirt. No tie. Possibly a sports coat (which you have the option of removing). This is how the majority of the men I've interviewed tend to dress (there's also the occasional sweater or polo shirt). I've also been on hiring committee where some of the interviewers have said some pretty harsh and negative things about anyone who shows up in a traditional suit.

If you're really that nervous about it, do you have a contact at the company you could ask for advice? (someone in HR or a hiring manager?)
I tend to agree with this--probably the safest route. It's not really an easy question, though, and I think that's why you get so many conflicting answers. The industry and geographical area can make a big difference as to the expectations. The only exception, I think, would be if you know that employees in your position need to wear a suit on occasion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
I agree that generally you dress up for the interview and then adapt to the office dress code. However, if whatever he wore to the first two interviews was sufficient to get him a third interview I would advise him to dress the way he dressed to the first two interviews.

I don't know how you would jump to the conclusion that he doesn't own a suit based on what he wrote.
Yep, don't rock the boat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by seain dublin View Post
You don't have the job yet. So it doesn't matter what they're wearing. After you get hired you can dress exactly like them.

Unless you're specifically instructed to say wear business casual, you wear a suit.

Think of it as how you would act if you were a guest in someone's home that you don't know really well. You tend to be a little neater in the bathroom, make your bed in the morning, don't go into the refrigerator unless they say help yourself, you're on your best behavior.

You're a guest at the company, so it is better to be overdressed than underdressed.

What would you do if the person you're meeting with who you have seen in photos online in business casual decides to wear a suit the day of your interview?

And you're sitting there underdressed.
I think that you also wouldn't want to make the host uncomfortable by overdressing. You've been to the office twice, so you can make a judgment about what to do. It's definitely most important to be comfortable with what you are wearing, and that could go either way.
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Old 01-28-2014, 01:47 PM
 
334 posts, read 466,604 times
Reputation: 745
Always the suit, dearie. Always the suit in an interview for a professional position.
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