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Old 01-31-2014, 05:52 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,782 posts, read 74,791,782 times
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if a person has not worked in 10 years they must be retrained to function in an office environment.
for the older worker no easy task.
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Old 01-31-2014, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,079 posts, read 8,480,785 times
Reputation: 15725
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nighteyes View Post
The answer is simple. You see, in nearly all companies, HR is NOT the hiring authority. The hiring authority, complete with all his/her biases and prejudices, is the department manager/supervisor.

-- Nighteyes
Agreed. HR will rarely (never in my exp) discard an app for this reason. What the HM does is anybody's guess.

IMO, unemploynpment is not really an issue. I do hate long, unexplained gaps in employment. It makes me suspicious that a job is being edited out for some reason.

Applicants who explain the gaps are fine by me.
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Old 01-31-2014, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, in between the Moose's butt and nose.
4,969 posts, read 7,333,917 times
Reputation: 1722
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
if a person has not worked in 10 years they must be retrained to function in an office environment.
for the older worker no easy task.
10 years is a stretch.as well. Usually applies to homekeepers or those on long term disability. In those cases they are, mostly, fresh out of a retraining school.
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Old 01-31-2014, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,079 posts, read 8,480,785 times
Reputation: 15725
Quote:
Originally Posted by beenhereandthere View Post
Indirectly, an employee is being stolen from another company.
Theft (stealing) refers to property.

People are not property and can move from job to job as they wish. I do not accept that other companies have property rights to their personnel, nor do I expect other companies to treat my staff as my property.
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Old 01-31-2014, 08:33 PM
 
268 posts, read 326,666 times
Reputation: 170
Don't think there is one specific reason. It might be an unconscious feeling. When you're single, girls often assume there might be something wrong with you if you have no girlfriend or haven't dated for a long time. As a result, they are cautious and a lot harder to attract. When you have a girlfriend, for some reason all the hot girls that you wanted when you were single suddenly reveal themselves. They want to ensure you are dating material by first confirming that other girls also find you attractive. What has changed about you during the entire process? Absolutely nothing.

I'm guessing companies are the same. Regardless of your reason, they assume there's something wrong with you and your ability to find work, and therefore find you less attractive. I think in both situations it's clear that fully capable people are sometimes just never given a chance.
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Old 01-31-2014, 09:41 PM
 
Location: 1000 miles from nowhere
549 posts, read 439,097 times
Reputation: 976
It is not that hiring someone who is unemployed is wrong. It is extremely likely there are (many) highly-qualified candidates who are currently employed in a comparable position and have been building experience/sharpening skills for x years, whereas the unemployed candidate has not or can not demonstrate via application. These employed candidates have at least some sort of proof of ability, unfair or not, which unfortunately an unemployed or newly-graduated person may not be able to offer. What is wrong with employers desiring to skilled, experienced employees?
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Old 01-31-2014, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
4,934 posts, read 5,828,911 times
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There are a lot of considerations that go into hiring anybody. It represents a substantial investment by the company. At my job, it takes over 6 months of intensive one on one training before the employee is qualified to do the job.

I am the supervisor, I do the interviews and the hiring. The first thing I look at is the application and resume. I look for spelling errors, bad syntax, and poor grammar because the job entails a lot of writing so those skills are desirable.

Next I look at the work history. I look to see if the jobs held were comparable to the job they would be taking. I look at the length of time spent at each job, the duties performed, and why they left.

I do check references.

If there is a period of unemployment, I look for a reason. It isn't an automatic out, but if there are no reasons besides "nobody wants to hire somebody of my race/creed/sex age etc." that would be a disqualifier.

The last employee I hired had been out of work for 2 years because of a workplace accident that left him with limited mobility.

He had sterling qualifications, and over the past 9 months has shown himself to be dependable, conscientious, willing to learn and accept responsibility, very open and friendly to other employees, in other words a real asset.

His limited mobility was difficult for most jobs, but working at a computer console, he uses his mind and is as good as anybody.

As an employer, I try to determine the best fit for the job and culture of the business. If the person has the best qualifications for the job, even if they have been out of work for a while, if there is a valid reason for it, I am happy to give them a chance.

I have found that in some cases, those that have a hard time finding work through no fault of their own, can be the most loyal and dedicated people I have.

If you have been out of work for a while, but are getting interviews, if you don't get the job, ask the interviewer if they will give you some pointers. Maybe you need to work on your writing skills, or polish your resume. Maybe you need to work on your interview skills, eye contact, being engaged and alert, having knowledge of what the company does, asking about specific duties you would be performing, all of these can impact the impression you make.

If you remember the person doing the hiring has a responsibility to the company to find the best person for the job, throw all the self pity and prejudices out the window, concentrate on making yourself the best candidate, have real reasons for being out of work for an extended period, and you may be surprised with that job you have been looking for.

The effort you put into getting hired will reflect well on you and give the interviewer something so that he can feel good about taking a chance on you.

Remember, they are trying to find the person that will perform the best in that job for the company. There is very little personality involved unless you are disrespectful, or the first question you ask is about vacations and sick days.

There are a lot of red flags that employers have, and you may not know what they are, but if you put forth a good faith effort, you can score interviews, and if you score interviews, you have a good shot if you have the skills to impress the person/s you are addressing in the interview.

Who knows? You may find you are employable after all
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Old 01-31-2014, 10:27 PM
 
149 posts, read 301,732 times
Reputation: 100
I just had a phone interview pre-screen the other day for a job where I was questioned about two prior job losses in 2009 and 2011. I work in a very niche industry, but even after explaining you could just feel "ice" through the phone. I'm currently contracting, and am looking for a salaried position. The rest of the interview went okay, but I am quite certain that i'll be receiving my rejection email next week. I am about an 80% match on paper, but I could just tell that the HR Recruiter did not like that there were 2 job losses in my history.

My point - hey, atleast I'm honest! I'm not exaggerating dates of employment, and I'm not falsifying job titles. I went through 2 bad job losses, and I had a hard time finding a new job due to my industry being small and niche. My resume is 100% the truth.
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Old 01-31-2014, 10:32 PM
 
51 posts, read 55,523 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mialia View Post
My point - hey, atleast I'm honest! I'm not exaggerating dates of employment, and I'm not falsifying job titles. I went through 2 bad job losses, and I had a hard time finding a new job due to my industry being small and niche. My resume is 100% the truth.
Yep! True that!
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Old 02-01-2014, 12:36 AM
 
Location: MN
1,305 posts, read 1,413,442 times
Reputation: 1579
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXred View Post
^This is great I agree with some others...people unemployed for some time are most likely unemployable. It is not the job of the hiring companies to give people a "break" and hire them. It is their job to get qualified employees and make a profit.
What makes someone who has been actively looking for work (but won't get hired) unqualified? How are they suddenly unemployable even though they'll have the degree, the skills, and the experience for the job? Do people magically forget how to work because of a layoff or something?

It seems like circular logic to me. If long-term unemployed people are going to interviews and then getting turned down due to their unemployment, how are they ever supposed to convince anyone of their employability as time goes on? The longer they're unemployed, the less qualified they are...and the less likely they are to get hired.
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