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Old 02-01-2014, 12:50 AM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,425,625 times
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I've hired people that were long term unemployed and I've turned away many more. It comes down to what the scenario is:

1. The individual has been productive over the last several years and kept themselves up to date, attended training on their own, and showed initiative to use their time wisely to better themselves (professionally and otherwise).

2. The individual has been actively looking for work in their field but has not kept up to date with the industry and has not gained any additional skills while unemployed. These individuals often need training. Worse, they expect training.

3. They've obviously been lazy and just riding the unemployment train.

Person 1 is an obvious hire. Person 3 is an obvious no-hire. Person 2 is also a no hire in almost all cases. An employer is not going to invest in you if you're not willing to invest in yourself.
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Old 02-01-2014, 12:56 AM
 
Location: MN
1,305 posts, read 1,408,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I've hired people that were long term unemployed and I've turned away many more. It comes down to what the scenario is:

1. The individual has been productive over the last several years and kept themselves up to date, attended training on their own, and showed initiative to use their time wisely to better themselves (professionally and otherwise).

2. The individual has been actively looking for work in their field but has not kept up to date with the industry and has not gained any additional skills while unemployed. These individuals often need training. Worse, they expect training.

3. They've obviously been lazy and just riding the unemployment train.

Person 1 is an obvious hire. Person 3 is an obvious no-hire. Person 2 is also a no hire in almost all cases. An employer is not going to invest in you if you're not willing to invest in yourself.
This. I cannot figure out why people wouldn't be doing some training on their own, especially with the workforce centers offering programs, dislocated worker programs, free networking groups and training programs, along with volunteerism. I'm currently unemployed (but a full time student) and volunteer to keep myself up to date and the people I know who were previously employed refused to do volunteer work or training on their own. They saw it as a waste of time when they could be looking for jobs. At the end of the day when the postings haven't changed much for the previous week, I'd say a person needs to figure out how to make better use of their time.
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Old 02-01-2014, 06:33 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 58,375,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
Yes I have had some career highs and lows but after forty years in corporate America including working in positions where I was responsible for hiring many employees, I know the answer to this question.
Obviously not. You were fired "many, many times" (your words) over the years and, had you learned anything at all after the first couple of times that number would have been less and you would probably have a job by now after the last dismissal. It's really a shame that you seem not to have the capacity to learn from your mistakes but worse that you insist on continually blaming employers for your own shortcomings.
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Old 02-01-2014, 07:21 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,490 posts, read 2,877,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vintage_girl View Post
What makes someone who has been actively looking for work (but won't get hired) unqualified? How are they suddenly unemployable even though they'll have the degree, the skills, and the experience for the job? Do people magically forget how to work because of a layoff or something?

It seems like circular logic to me. If long-term unemployed people are going to interviews and then getting turned down due to their unemployment, how are they ever supposed to convince anyone of their employability as time goes on? The longer they're unemployed, the less qualified they are...and the less likely they are to get hired.
Agreed. Unfortunately, perception outweighs all other expectations. In some cases, the work a currently employed person does is far inferior to the studies of some unemployed person. I know of IT jobs where people just show up to work, collect a pay check, but don't really do anything productive (and no, this ain't limited to federal government work, har har.)

What amuses me more is when a company tries to "poach" a currently employed person, but they botch it by not offering a higher salary, nor any incentive to switch companies. If you want the skills, but don't want to pay a higher wage, then that's truly what the unemployed are for... make sure they can do the job, and you can try to lower your rates due to their situation.
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Old 02-01-2014, 07:33 AM
 
1,543 posts, read 2,066,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mialia View Post
I just had a phone interview pre-screen the other day for a job where I was questioned about two prior job losses in 2009 and 2011. I work in a very niche industry, but even after explaining you could just feel "ice" through the phone. I'm currently contracting, and am looking for a salaried position. The rest of the interview went okay, but I am quite certain that i'll be receiving my rejection email next week. I am about an 80% match on paper, but I could just tell that the HR Recruiter did not like that there were 2 job losses in my history.

My point - hey, atleast I'm honest! I'm not exaggerating dates of employment, and I'm not falsifying job titles. I went through 2 bad job losses, and I had a hard time finding a new job due to my industry being small and niche. My resume is 100% the truth.
Heh "ice through the phone" is a great description. Unemployment gaps suck there is no question about that, the best one can do is fill it with something, anything (retail, volunteer, intern etc...) and if that something is not satisfactory I am not quite sure what else to tell the interviewer.
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Old 02-01-2014, 07:37 AM
 
1,305 posts, read 1,318,416 times
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I don't understand the HR hate around here. They don't make the decisions. Especially in the technical field, they ain't got any authority to do anything. All they do is follow procedure with paperwork and such.

If engineers are hired by HR, our bridges would be collapsing by now. Our infrastructure would be crumbling and people would be dying.

For my current job, I was interviewed by the RE (resident engineer... the top dog of an engineering project). He's the one that made the decision to hire me. He then passed the info onto HR where they called me in to fill out some paperwork and stuff for formality.
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Old 02-01-2014, 07:46 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,490 posts, read 2,877,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
Heh "ice through the phone" is a great description. Unemployment gaps suck there is no question about that, the best one can do is fill it with something, anything (retail, volunteer, intern etc...) and if that something is not satisfactory I am not quite sure what else to tell the interviewer.
I don't quite get this line of thinking either.... if you're an out of work, say... engineer, how could folding sweaters, brewing coffee, dog sitting possibly make you more marketable for an engineer position? They shouldn't care about that. AFAIK, you're not better off, or even worse than someone who remained unemployed and used the time to fully seek work and/or train.
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Old 02-01-2014, 08:20 AM
 
149 posts, read 300,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
Heh "ice through the phone" is a great description. Unemployment gaps suck there is no question about that, the best one can do is fill it with something, anything (retail, volunteer, intern etc...) and if that something is not satisfactory I am not quite sure what else to tell the interviewer.
I feel like if I add in volunteer work where i was unemployed (in my case, make something up) that it looks like I'm blowing smoke, and trying to cover something up.
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Old 02-01-2014, 08:33 AM
 
1,305 posts, read 1,318,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
I don't quite get this line of thinking either.... if you're an out of work, say... engineer, how could folding sweaters, brewing coffee, dog sitting possibly make you more marketable for an engineer position? They shouldn't care about that. AFAIK, you're not better off, or even worse than someone who remained unemployed and used the time to fully seek work and/or train.
There are plenty of things a person could do to keep his skills sharpened and also support himself.

I got my bachelors in physics. Got accepted by fermilab to help with research. Then the economy tanked and research money pulled. Not only did I no longer have the job, but they also let go a bunch of phd physicists. My degree was now unemployable. I did the next best thing. I took a different path to my goal of working a career in a technical field. I applied and started working at a hardware store to support myself. And during this time, I pursued a job in law enforcement. Got accepted by my state police department. I worked a number of years as a state trooper. During this time, I took night classes to get a masters in engineering. At one point, I had enough money saved up so I quit the state police completely and studied full time. When I got my masters, another stumbling block presented itself. My state cut its construction budget from $3B to $1B. This had a domino effect to companies in both the public ad private sector. I wasn't going to sit around and wait to get lucky. I used what money I had and started a business. And that business kept my afloat for some 2 years before I finally arrived at an honest to god engineering job.

Anyway, here I am working for an engineering firm driving a company car with gas allowance to drive back and forth to a nice comfy office.

For those who can't find work in the field you want, DO NOT GIVE UP. If you can't take a direct path there, find an alternate route. Do whatever it takes to get there.
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Old 02-01-2014, 09:25 AM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,465,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
I don't quite get this line of thinking either.... if you're an out of work, say... engineer, how could folding sweaters, brewing coffee, dog sitting possibly make you more marketable for an engineer position? They shouldn't care about that. AFAIK, you're not better off, or even worse than someone who remained unemployed and used the time to fully seek work and/or train.
Two years ago, I was getting laid off after my employer was sold. I spent the next 2 months studying for a $250 SQL certification. I had 2 employers interviewing me with offers for $12.5k raise and $20k raise.

My former boss moved to another company and tried to lure me away. He asked about my salary at the new employer. His jaw dropped.

I never told him about the new SQL certification, that I picked up. LOL. The $20k raise would have been above market for my old skills(Access/Excel).

I could do what other people do and sit around for months. It would be mind numbing. I rather make myself more marketable and put myself in a better position.
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