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Old 02-02-2014, 11:52 AM
 
7,373 posts, read 11,542,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosie_hair View Post
Having a min cutoff is a terrible idea. If studies after studies and google (the corporation) have shown that gpa has no connection whatsoever to work performance, why have a min cutoff at all? It's a number that any simpleton can use. Finding a good potential candidate is a lot harder to do.
Google executive: GPA, test scores 'worthless' for hiring | The Daily Caller

This study?

Funny, but that exec being quoted got his MBA at Yale. I'm sure that played no factor in him actually getting a job at Google.

He also says interviews are useless.

Maybe if he could put his $ where his mouth is, he could hire Google's next 10 software engineers from the bottom of the Computer Science class at Podunk State instead of the typical high performing Stanford and MIT grads, not even interview them and just fly them out to Silicon Valley, bet his job that they will excel, and see how he does.

Last edited by jobaba; 02-02-2014 at 12:01 PM..
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Old 02-02-2014, 01:08 PM
 
268 posts, read 324,137 times
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So basically, everyone seems to be saying that if you're smart and have the ability to do well in school, you can still get away with slacking off because companies don't care about what your GPA is? I'll agree that GPA and tests are not a good indicator of work performance and ability, but surely someone who managed a decent GPA has at least a couple qualities that are desirable. I also agree there shouldn't be cutoff points with GPA's, but chances are someone with a 2.0 GPA will not perform as well as someone with a 4.0.

So what, exactly, is the point of doing well in school then? Are we advocating people spend less time focusing on performance in classes, and more time partying? Less time studying for tests and doing homework, and more time playing video games? Hell, had I known earlier I would have had a much more enjoyable experience. How do you measure someone's ability before they enter the workforce? If you say internships, how does one go about getting a good one when competing with lots of other students if your grades are horrible?

I also think that are many students who could have gone to an Ivy League school, but chose a State university for one reason or another, and would be at a disadvantage. People tend to clump students in the same category depending on the type of school they went to, but there are some truly exceptional students that could have easily gotten into Harvard or Yale. Are there other ways to determine who these people are, or are they doomed to forever be labeled as "second rate" State university grads in the eyes of Ivy Leaguers?

What if you have been underemployed for a few years and have potential for so much more? Or you're looking to switch careers completely and it's been a few years since you graduated? Can't necessarily use past experience. As for me, I've been putting my GPA on, even though I graduated 4 years ago. Mostly because I'm switching into another field which essentially makes me a new grad some respects.
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Old 02-02-2014, 01:30 PM
 
112 posts, read 250,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guawazi View Post
So what, exactly, is the point of doing well in school then?
There is no point. In the seventh grade I got an "F" in music class. I was upset at this crappy teacher who gave an unjustified failing grade and my parents told me off. How much impact do you suppose this seventh grade failing grade had on my life and future career prospects? It's no different than college for most people. It's a waste of time and money.
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Old 02-02-2014, 01:49 PM
 
7,373 posts, read 11,542,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guawazi View Post

I also think that are many students who could have gone to an Ivy League school, but chose a State university for one reason or another, and would be at a disadvantage. People tend to clump students in the same category depending on the type of school they went to, but there are some truly exceptional students that could have easily gotten into Harvard or Yale. Are there other ways to determine who these people are, or are they doomed to forever be labeled as "second rate" State university grads in the eyes of Ivy Leaguers?

What if you have been underemployed for a few years and have potential for so much more? Or you're looking to switch careers completely and it's been a few years since you graduated? Can't necessarily use past experience. As for me, I've been putting my GPA on, even though I graduated 4 years ago. Mostly because I'm switching into another field which essentially makes me a new grad some respects.
I agree with this, and people who couldn't afford Stanford would still be going to UCLA, still a great school.

But my point was more that you work hard in high school to get into a good college, and work hard in college to get a good GPA to help you get a job.

If all of that means nothing, then technically, you have 22 years of slacking, goofing off, smoking pot, and video game playing to look forward to. Worry about everything else at that point.
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Old 02-02-2014, 03:05 PM
 
417 posts, read 712,881 times
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People skills and work ethic are a lot more important to long term success...the GPA is just a little filter that few employers care about, don't put it on your resume because it looks pompous, if they want to know they will ask you in the interview.
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Old 02-02-2014, 04:48 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 6,603,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliss2 View Post
I have five years experience in the field, I don't know if that changes the answer or not.
You are an experienced professional.

Your GPA doesn't belong on your resume anymore.
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:22 PM
 
2,839 posts, read 4,987,260 times
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I've never put my GPA on my resume, don't see the need to, a degree from an accredited entity is a degree, period.

I don't buy that someone who has a lower GPA isn't as good as someone with a higher GPA. Some people test better, some people didn't have to work while in college, etc.
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:35 PM
 
7,373 posts, read 11,542,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beera View Post
I've never put my GPA on my resume, don't see the need to, a degree from an accredited entity is a degree, period.

I don't buy that someone who has a lower GPA isn't as good as someone with a higher GPA. Some people test better, some people didn't have to work while in college, etc.
So then, I ask again.

Why does everybody tell their kids to work hard at school when the fact that you get a degree from anywhere with any GPA is all the same? Why do people ground their kids for getting bad grades when it's so painfully obvious that academic performance has no bearing on anything in real life?

When a 4.0 from Harvard will be dismissed as 'just as good as a 2.0 degree from anywhere' by at least most employers, what is the point of doing that?

Will you tell your children to just 'do whatever' in school because it's not important for anything in the real world?

Last edited by jobaba; 02-02-2014 at 06:48 PM..
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:13 PM
 
2,839 posts, read 4,987,260 times
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You sound disappointed... unfortunately that is the reality for many fields.

IMO having a 2.0 in college is better than just having a high school diploma. That 2.0 degree opens up more doors than the diploma. To me a GPA is nothing more than how much skill you have taking tests, since most grades come from tests in college.

Of course I'll tell my kids to do their best, but just because they don't have a 3.0+ doesn't mean they aren't worthy of employment or something... In fact, I'll also encourage my kids to work during the summer in their field, to intern, and so on.

BTW if I had two applications, one a person with Harvard but zero work experience, the other a person from a state university but did internships and worked jobs in the field, I'd be more likely to go with the person who worked and went to college.
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:26 PM
 
7,373 posts, read 11,542,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beera View Post
You sound disappointed... unfortunately that is the reality for many fields.

IMO having a 2.0 in college is better than just having a high school diploma. That 2.0 degree opens up more doors than the diploma. To me a GPA is nothing more than how much skill you have taking tests, since most grades come from tests in college.

Of course I'll tell my kids to do their best, but just because they don't have a 3.0+ doesn't mean they aren't worthy of employment or something... In fact, I'll also encourage my kids to work during the summer in their field, to intern, and so on.

BTW if I had two applications, one a person with Harvard but zero work experience, the other a person from a state university but did internships and worked jobs in the field, I'd be more likely to go with the person who worked and went to college.
No. I understand what's going on.

I mean, just everybody wants their own situation to represent the best.

I mean, I didn't do to Harvard and I never could have gotten in, and I respect somebody who went there. Just like I respect the amount of work that goes into getting a 4.0 in college. I wasn't close to that either. But if others can't see it, so be it.

Anyway, this horse has been beaten before.

I think in general, life is too competitive and stressful. So much so, that every side is trying to beat each other and portray their situation as the best one and discredit any and all achievement of others. Including people who come on here with high school degrees and brag about how much more $ they make than suckers who went on to get Masters degrees.
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