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Old 02-10-2014, 04:19 PM
 
50 posts, read 62,968 times
Reputation: 33

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I am currently job searching and this is one scenario I have yet to come across, but I just saw a posting today where it applies:

I saw a position posted that I feel I have a decent shot at getting an interview for, if not landing the job offer. The thing is, it is with a company where I know the person who would be supervising me. I have never worked for him before, but I know him from my work at a publication. (I am a writer; he is in PR and the posting I saw today is with his company, and he'd be the supervisor.)

I have never applied somewhere where I already know the person who would be in charge of me, or at least screening the applications. So, I am not sure how to navigate this. Two questions:

-Do I reach out to him in advance and let him know I saw the posting and would like to apply? I will still go through the online application system like I would if we didn't somewhat work together.

-How would I go about addressing the cover letter? Normally, I will write "Dear Hiring Manager" or "Dear Mr./Ms. X" (if the person's name is advertised), but I feel like neither is appropriate here. I know the culture at the company where I'm applying doesn't call for employees to address their supervisors as Mr./Ms. So-and-So. So, would "Dear (Manager's First Name)" work here?

Any help is appreciated!
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Old 02-10-2014, 04:29 PM
 
4,749 posts, read 3,607,028 times
Reputation: 3225
It's hard to know because there are different shades of color in this kind of situation. At the end of the day, whether the hiring manager knows the person or even likes the person, he/she still has to ask the same core questions: "Is this person qualified," and no less important, "would this person (you) be a good fit for this organization?"

If it were me, I think what I'd do is probably call the person up and try to informally "interview" him about the job. Ask questions about the job description, what you'd be doing, etc..He'll probably then encourage you to send in the CV, with caution you that the process will be competitive so there won't be any guarantees. My guess is you'll at least get the interview if you're truly qualified, if he likes your previous work, and if he actually likes you the person. You'll probably have the advantage but that won't guarantee anything. BUt at least by calling him and casually talking to him about the job, you'll get his attention.
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Old 02-10-2014, 04:32 PM
 
1,158 posts, read 1,048,906 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenfriedbananas View Post
It's hard to know because there are different shades of color in this kind of situation. At the end of the day, whether the hiring manager knows the person or even likes the person, he/she still has to ask the same core questions: "Is this person qualified," and no less important, "would this person (you) be a good fit for this organization?"

If it were me, I think what I'd do is probably call the person up and try to informally "interview" him about the job. Ask questions about the job description, what you'd be doing, etc..He'll probably then encourage you to send in the CV, with caution you that the process will be competitive so there won't be any guarantees. My guess is you'll at least get the interview if you're truly qualified, if he likes your previous work, and if he actually likes you the person. You'll probably have the advantage but that won't guarantee anything. BUt at least by calling him and casually talking to him about the job, you'll get his attention.
This. You can at least gauge how qualified you actually are relative to others, and if it will be worth your time to apply and interview.
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