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Old 05-09-2014, 01:52 PM
 
398 posts, read 571,583 times
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I'd just conduct the process as I currently do now. Great sense of urgency, organization, HONESTY, and constant contact with candidates because I've been on the other end desperately looking for jobs before.
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Old 05-09-2014, 02:41 PM
 
182 posts, read 374,773 times
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Everybody's posted some pretty good responses, one of my main gripes with the selection process is the lack of notification when you're not selected. I understand that you may get hundreds of applications for each position, but if I'm one of the handful of people that makes it through the application, HR interview, phone interview and in person interview(s), at least have the decency to send me a rejection letter if I'm not selected. Don't just leave me hanging...
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Old 05-09-2014, 02:51 PM
 
1,158 posts, read 1,049,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmooth View Post
Everybody's posted some pretty good responses, one of my main gripes with the selection process is the lack of notification when you're not selected. I understand that you may get hundreds of applications for each position, but if I'm one of the handful of people that makes it through the application, HR interview, phone interview and in person interview(s), at least have the decency to send me a rejection letter if I'm not selected. Don't just leave me hanging...
I interviewed for a job out in the LA suburbs 5 weeks ago to the day. I finally got an answer today - I was not selected. I had to contact all 3 HR folks I was in contact with, and had to write back several times.

What the sad part is, that their internal recruiter found me, and I had a phone screen with the hiring manager. They decided to fly me out on their dime. In total, I talked with 6 technical people - 2 on the phone before the in person interview, and 4 on site. I have a feeling that I was rejected because I did not have experience in their exact software system, even though I have been using a similar one for the past 11 years. Oh, and it should be noted that I killed myself to get out there and almost didn't make it - flights were delayed in and out of O'Hare where I had to switch planes. I didn't get out there till 3am Pacific.
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Old 05-09-2014, 03:16 PM
 
3,721 posts, read 3,919,485 times
Reputation: 3366
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmooth View Post
Everybody's posted some pretty good responses, one of my main gripes with the selection process is the lack of notification when you're not selected. I understand that you may get hundreds of applications for each position, but if I'm one of the handful of people that makes it through the application, HR interview, phone interview and in person interview(s), at least have the decency to send me a rejection letter if I'm not selected. Don't just leave me hanging...

I absolutely agree here. If I have came in for an in person interview I would think some type of communication is justified. To not say a word is well, tacky and unprofessional.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:57 PM
 
41 posts, read 39,557 times
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Leave the hiring primarily to the department head/supervisor and ask them to write a clear, concise ad. The ad should not be made fancy, just very straight-forward and leaving out any unneeded capitalization so it doesn't appear it's shouting at candidates.

Ideally, the supervisor is a former worker bee in that specific department themselves and worked in it for several years, so they are very familiar with the daily ins and outs of the position.

For a better feeling for potential candidates, instruct them to snail-mail or fax their resumes in directly to the supervisor's attention so that they feel like their resume is actually being seen.

Initial contact would be made by email by the supervisor and it would be simply inviting people in for an in-person interview directly with them. Time isn't wasted over the phone - instead, go right for the guts of it and just call people in.

The process would be decided with two in-person interviews, reference check phone calls and any potential testing that is needed (the testing is only done if it's a really involved, technical position that required a lot of school). The interviews would be friendly and conversational in nature and the supervisor would talk honestly about themselves, the company and the position and the interviewee would do the same. Neither party would have to be perfect - the point is basic humanity and friendliness. The people who aren't selected would be notified by either snail-mail or email (get rid of the insulting phone call rejections!).

HR's only involvement with the process would be running the criminal background check and taking care of new hire paperwork.

After hire:

A worker in the department who the supervisor trusts would do the training and the bulk of their work would be delegated to other people for two weeks. The training would be on the direct duties of the position. After the first two weeks, the trainer would get about half of their given-away work back while continuing to be available for training as the new hire would begin to get hands-on experience. After a month, the new person is largely on their own but questions are still encouraged.
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Old 05-15-2014, 08:31 AM
 
3,721 posts, read 3,919,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thepickedthruspithole View Post
For a better feeling for potential candidates, instruct them to snail-mail or fax their resumes in directly to the supervisor's attention so that they feel like their resume is actually being seen.

Agreed. All this online mumbo jumbo can sometimes be a pain in the you know what and most of the time your resume is not even seen.
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Old 05-15-2014, 09:02 AM
 
2,677 posts, read 3,864,236 times
Reputation: 1332
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmooth View Post
Everybody's posted some pretty good responses, one of my main gripes with the selection process is the lack of notification when you're not selected. I understand that you may get hundreds of applications for each position, but if I'm one of the handful of people that makes it through the application, HR interview, phone interview and in person interview(s), at least have the decency to send me a rejection letter if I'm not selected. Don't just leave me hanging...
Exactly.

Someone else also mentioned a sense of urgency. I hate when you go in and they tell you "oh we're so short staffed, we need someone right away" and then they drag their feet.

One other things is the length of the job descriptions. Why not just have a few bullet points of what the job entails with specifics. Then list minimum qualification and ideal candidate qualifications. I hate when they have 10 bullet points that basically allude to the fact that the person has to be on time, not fight with co-workers, be able to use a phone, be able to read/write etc. Those things seem common sense to me and just clutter the job description.
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Old 05-15-2014, 10:08 AM
 
1,475 posts, read 2,246,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmooth View Post
I understand that you may get hundreds of applications for each position...
So you say they get hundreds of applications. The companies say they can't find people. Which are we to believe?!
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Old 05-15-2014, 10:53 AM
 
182 posts, read 374,773 times
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Originally Posted by Rich_CD View Post
So you say they get hundreds of applications. The companies say they can't find people. Which are we to believe?!
Well, I know from first hand experience that many job announcements receive a ton of applications. In my job prior to this one, the department that I worked in dealt primarily with human resources for one of the sub-agencies of the Department of Homeland Security. For EVERY vacancy that they posted, they received between 100-300 applications.

Even when I was looking for a job myself, I noticed that some job sites like CareerBuilder and LinkedIn, actually tell you how many people have viewed the job position and applied to it. Careerbuilder goes even deeper and gives you statistics on the applicants to some positions (i.e. the education level of the applicants, the number of years of experience and whether they are currently employed or not). When I looked at the statistics on the jobs that I applied to the number of applicants ranged anywhere from 50-100+.

I do believe that SOME employers are legitimately having a hard time finding people and I do believe there are a good number of jobs out there. The key is a lot of those jobs don't pay a whole lot. If you were making $50K-70K and lost your job, it's a hard a pill to swallow to go to working for $10-$13 an hour (especially if your area has a high cost of living).
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Old 05-15-2014, 11:52 AM
 
1,090 posts, read 1,782,914 times
Reputation: 1532
I'd follow the typical interview process, but ask questions to weed out BS artists, liars and generally people who no real interest in the job except as stepping stone.

I'd have a full induction process after they are employed,management and expectations, specific information in the interview about the work concerned - Far too many employers want plug and play employees, they look at a CV/Resume hire them proceed to ignore them, give them no guidance, expectations, management and even times make life difficult for them.


While they might have the skills to do the jobs there is often a steep learning curve that is often made more difficult by dysfunctional organisations/hostile environment.

Then where there is high turnover of staff, i'd take a very close look at the reason - Far too many managers have people leaving like there is a fire drill and proceed to get away with it year after year.
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