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Old 02-11-2014, 07:49 AM
 
1,480 posts, read 2,304,949 times
Reputation: 1611

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This board is full of postings from frustrated job hunters who hate how American businesses recruit, interview, test, select and finalize the hiring of staff. So many of you just HATE the process those idiots in HR have implemented and the time consuming online applications, testing, countless interviews, extensive background checks and other types of bureacracy.

Here is your chance to update the process! You are now a Project Manager of a government contractor. Within a month you have to recruit, interview and hire a wide variety of highly trained professionals in a number of career fields. HR is there to help, but if you think they are fools, you don't have to use them. There is 15 openings that need to be filled.

You can expect that you will get hundreds of resumes for every opening through online sources like Monster.com. Many of the resumes will come from applicants who are not qualified. But you will have about 20 well qualified applicants for each position. Your challenge is to determine which person is best.

How are you going to screen the hundreds of resumes that come in? Print them all out and spend 5 minutes reading all 300 of them? Or use a computer aided KEY WORD search? Will you do phone screens? How will you interview and test the applicants who come to your office? Determine who is best? Check their backgrounds? And finalize the hire?

How important will personality be in the selection process? Or will technical skills be the main criteria? Will you make small talk with the applicants to see if they fit with the personality of the team? Will you test them, and if so, how? How will you really know if someone who has the technical skills can really do the job under real world pressure? How will you know if the professional refrences are telling the truth?

Critics of the current process: Here is your chance to come up with a better plan. This hiring stuff is harder than you thought! GO!

Last edited by I'm Retired Now; 02-11-2014 at 08:02 AM..
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,804 posts, read 13,297,378 times
Reputation: 15960
Very simply. I post the job (with a salary range) have HR discard only the applications that do not meet the absolute minimum qualification ie does not have the degree necessary. I'd then pick the strongest candidates to interview. I'd use the interview to assess their competence to perform the job by either testing, asking relevant questions etc and just make sure they aren't a total dimwit as in showing up late, poorly dressed and can present themselves in a professional manner. I'd then make a decission based on qualifications and send out an offer. Once the offer was accepted I'd have HR send out polite rejection letters.

What I would not do is let HR pick the best chemist, bombard them with psychological testing and whatever other quackery they can come up with, insert their bigotries into the hiring process based on what they consider red flags such as gaps, age, credit, over qualified, a single bad reference from an ex supervisor, or anyone who has ever been fired in their life.


Hiring is not as difficult as HR people make it out to be and yes you will make a bad hire now and then as it is simply unavoidable and those gimicks the HR profession come up with do not help.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:27 AM
 
1,049 posts, read 2,521,992 times
Reputation: 1369
Same as above with having hr toss only the clearly unqualified. Id take them all to the bar on a weeknight, get them all ****faced and hire the candidate that is the most level headed, least retarded and annoying.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:36 AM
 
2,285 posts, read 3,111,931 times
Reputation: 3664
For starters, your timeline is flawed. Unless I procrastinated horribly, 90 days would be far more logical for your scenario.

Anyway, I'd use the same process I do now:

1. HR posts the job ads I've approved on the company website, indeed, and local newspaper website. Depending on the specific role and market scarcity, I may also direct them to post on "specialty" boards such as dice.com, etc. Each ad contains the following:

1. Reasonably accurate description of work, without being pages long.

2. Salary range, with the tag "commensurate with qualifications"

3. A clear section of Minimum Requirements (non-negotiable), separated from a description of the "ideal candidate".

4. An email address to submit a résumé for consideration, and the date the posting closes.

The day after the posting closes, I meet with my management direct reports and we begin paring down the resumes. I usually allow for 1/2 day here. Paring out those that meet the minimums first is rather easy. We then go back through the stack and read a little closer. I'm looking for:
1. Customized or semi-customized submission, anything with an "objective" that doesn't directly align with the position is tossed.
2. Relevant experience or education. For a "thin file" or new grad, I'm going to look for highlights of activities that show they did more than just go to school and accumulate debt.
3. Consistency. Ideally, they've been in the same industry or geographic location for some time. Again, this will greatly depend on the position. I look for a little movement. The perfect candidate for a mid-level analyst will likely have 5-6 years of experience with 2-3 companies. Varies up and down with the role.
4. Certifications and accomplishments. Quantifiable success in prior roles.

Automatic DQ's:
Spelling and grammar shot to hell.
Obvious cut/paste jobs (particularly when it comes to describing prior roles).
Rehires.

Once we've got the stack down to 5-7 applicants per position (hopefully), I will direct my HR rep to schedule 30-45 minute phone screens with each of the 5-7. Everyone else gets the dreaded rejection email.

My management team and I will split these up and pare down the stack again to the top 3. During the phone interview, I'm looking for someone who's going to sell me on why they want the job. We always start on Monday, finish by Friday. Rejection/next step conversations occur by that Friday.

I'm also looking for honesty, obviously prepped "here's what I think they want to hear" that lacks conviction gets you tossed. Someone who says "truthfully, I've been out of work/underemployed for 18 months and really need this" is going to get the nod over someone who rambles on with some jargon babble that is obviously lacking.

#'s 4-7 get the dreaded rejection email. 1-3 are invited to a peer interview. Now in your hypothetical, there are no peers - but that's not real life. Peer interviews have pre planned questions, and is more about using the team to help select their new member from a technical knowledge perspective, the front line likely knows what they need the most. (1.5 hours)
Directly following the peer interview, is the manager panel. Myself and the person who would be their direct supervisor. (1.5 hours)

Top person gets the offer within 2 days, with a 5-day timeline to accept or reject. Concurrent to this, I'm running background and drug testing.

#2-3 get a phone call advising them that we didn't select them this time around, and if the position or one like it does open up, we'll call them before posting the job.

After 15 years of doing this, I usually don't post many jobs. I just call 5-6 people that were #2-3 and have them come back in and reinterview.

Last edited by RoadWarrior12; 02-11-2014 at 09:48 AM..
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,103 posts, read 4,277,849 times
Reputation: 10056
I would let the Hiring manager write the job description, not use a standard HR description from a database.
I would post the EXACT job duties and an explanation of the purpose of the role, i.e. "This project oriented role is being created so that we can fix problems that we are having with the ERP system."
I would be honest in the posting whether it was a term or a permanent position.
I would post salary range so people dont waste their time and mine.
I wouldnt even have a section for preferred requirements. There would only be minimum requirements. Preferred may keep someone who is perfectly qualified from applying when they see "Preferred Masters degree" and dont have one.
I would instruct HR to only filter out those that dont meet the minimum requirements and felons. Sure that may leave you with 100 applicants, but thats what you get when youre a hiring manager.
I would QUICKLY get back with applicants on a decision so that they arent sitting around for 2 weeks biting their nails. Courtesy is courtesy.
I would provide feedback to the top candidates that I actually interviewed, though run it through legal first just incase.
I would only schedule 1 interview day with each candidate, but make it a long one with multiple people. This respects the fact that the candidate is taking time away from their job, potentially risking their employment.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:44 AM
 
3,154 posts, read 3,064,368 times
Reputation: 8686
I'd probably do temp to perm or something like that. You can't really know someone until you actually work with them. I've seen so many good on paper people turn out to be awful.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,804 posts, read 13,297,378 times
Reputation: 15960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mnseca View Post
I'd probably do temp to perm or something like that. You can't really know someone until you actually work with them. I've seen so many good on paper people turn out to be awful.
The trouble with that is once you involve a temp agency you become everyone's last choice for employment. Noone trusts temp-to-hire, the agency robs the workers blind, and noone currently employed will consider you. A probationary period without the temp agency would be better.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:51 AM
 
2,285 posts, read 3,111,931 times
Reputation: 3664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mnseca View Post
I'd probably do temp to perm or something like that. You can't really know someone until you actually work with them. I've seen so many good on paper people turn out to be awful.
I tried this route for about a year. Cost me about $5K more per new hire than just taking my chances did. Not to mention the quality of candidate was shaky.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:59 AM
 
Location: DFW
6,800 posts, read 11,777,391 times
Reputation: 5149
I would have a timed multiple choice test asking about basic information that's needed to do the job and information on the company. A passing score earns you the ability to submit your resume and cover letter. This alone should greatly narrow the pool of applicants to the most qualified and serious. Even if you choose to "game" the test by getting help from your friends, it's fine since this alone shows your commitment rather than blindly submitting your resume everywhere and I just happened to receive it.
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Old 02-11-2014, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,275 posts, read 4,770,890 times
Reputation: 4042
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchemist80 View Post
The trouble with that is once you involve a temp agency you become everyone's last choice for employment. Noone trusts temp-to-hire, the agency robs the workers blind, and noone currently employed will consider you. A probationary period without the temp agency would be better.
I agree. I would never apply with a temp agency, personally, unless I had been unemployed for a very long time and was completely desperate.

The biggest thing I think would make the hiring process better would be to include a salary range on every posting. I have gone as far as making it to 2nd or 3rd round interviews with a company only to find out that their salary expectation was so far from mine that there's no way we could make it work. What a waste of all our time.

I also think companies need to get more organized. For the job I have now I had a phone screen with a recruiter, then a phone screen with the company's HR, then a phone screen with the hiring manager. After that I had 2 in person interviews. Then, it took 3 weeks for them to tell me the offer details and an additional week to get the offer actually written. End to end, the process took about 2 months from when I applied to when I started. There is absolutely no reason it should take that long. If you need 5 people to sign off on a candidate, then schedule their interview on a day all 5 people are available so they don't have to take 5 days off of work. Seriously. Respecting a candidate's time isn't rocket science.
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