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Old 08-01-2014, 11:33 PM
 
38 posts, read 38,591 times
Reputation: 43

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Ok I've seen these words twice already on this forum. I don't know the exact difference, but I always in my resume I put what I did. I have had friends look over my resume and they both said I need to put what I accomplished in my obs. I guess this is the achievement resume. I actually don't like achievement because it makes me pigeon holed into one job title when they see how good I was at my last job. Or it makes people think that's all I can do. I like the previous format of resume better.
For the hiring managers on the forum, what is the best resume? (Bear in mind, I'm in IT if that matters)
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Old 08-02-2014, 03:33 AM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,699 posts, read 8,159,083 times
Reputation: 7958
I am in IT, and currently the point-person for filling two (soon to be four or six) openings. I've found the vast majority of resumes to be of absolutely no value. It takes no effort whatsoever to throw every TLA in the discipline in voluminous lists. My tech lead has found no real depth of understanding underneath most of the TLAs on most of the resumes we've reviewed, and there is no way to tell the prevarication from the truth, so effectively every skill listed on every skills-based resume is equally suspect. People don't consider it lying when they list a technology for which they've read a few overviews or did a tutorial. If forced to explain how their special skills resulted in certain achievements of value for the company, they perhaps would be more honest, I suppose.

If you showed achievements at a progression of jobs then why would you think that employers wouldn't want to be the next stop in the progression? Or are you saying that you're trying to parlay demonstrated expertise you have had in the past into rational for hiring you to do something completely unrelated?

I have to admit that I'm not interested in employees who are looking at my company as a place to stop on their rabid climb up some ladder, i.e., looking to use this job change as a means of preemptively grasping for the next rung of the ladder, or worse, two rungs up from where they are now. Rather am looking for employees who are looking to invest their time and energy in helping build a business that they'll grow within, just like I have. Perhaps that's a difference. I'm not sure I know anyone who works for a company that is looking to hire people who have not demonstrated the ability to do what it is the company needs done at this time. Rather, I think we're all looking to hire people who can do the job that we need done now, and along the way grow their skills so that we can promote them into the next logical position in their career.
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Old 08-02-2014, 10:40 AM
Status: "Busy being triggered by pumpkins" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
17,357 posts, read 8,536,890 times
Reputation: 18088
I'm not in IT but will tell you that having an achievement-oriented resume doesn't mean you'll be stuck in the same job. It just shows you're capable of taking a job and doing extraordinary things. That's the type of person we want on our team. Your achievements show you are probably ambitious, creative, determined, and bright. Those qualities cross over to other positions, so don't worry about being pigeon-holed.
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Old 08-02-2014, 05:43 PM
 
38 posts, read 38,591 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by bUU View Post
I am in IT, and currently the point-person for filling two (soon to be four or six) openings. I've found the vast majority of resumes to be of absolutely no value. It takes no effort whatsoever to throw every TLA in the discipline in voluminous lists. My tech lead has found no real depth of understanding underneath most of the TLAs on most of the resumes we've reviewed, and there is no way to tell the prevarication from the truth, so effectively every skill listed on every skills-based resume is equally suspect. People don't consider it lying when they list a technology for which they've read a few overviews or did a tutorial. If forced to explain how their special skills resulted in certain achievements of value for the company, they perhaps would be more honest, I suppose.

If you showed achievements at a progression of jobs then why would you think that employers wouldn't want to be the next stop in the progression? Or are you saying that you're trying to parlay demonstrated expertise you have had in the past into rational for hiring you to do something completely unrelated?

I have to admit that I'm not interested in employees who are looking at my company as a place to stop on their rabid climb up some ladder, i.e., looking to use this job change as a means of preemptively grasping for the next rung of the ladder, or worse, two rungs up from where they are now. Rather am looking for employees who are looking to invest their time and energy in helping build a business that they'll grow within, just like I have. Perhaps that's a difference. I'm not sure I know anyone who works for a company that is looking to hire people who have not demonstrated the ability to do what it is the company needs done at this time. Rather, I think we're all looking to hire people who can do the job that we need done now, and along the way grow their skills so that we can promote them into the next logical position in their career.
It is for that reason that achievement oriented resumes, which would show how you applied your skills, would work better. Especially in today's job climate. My resume is a mix of both. I get few interviews though, but this could just be because there is so many people applying. My competition could be anything under the sun from no worries to the MIT graduate. But when I do get the interview, I love talking about my achievements. People seem impressed with what I've done because it's good, but theyd on't see me enough. Plus taking time off for school hurt me more than anything. Any new skill is irrelevent to employers because it was learned in school. They act like I just googled a tutorial. (years ago you used to be able to do that...in fact, that's how I made my first home page
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