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Old 11-16-2015, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,545,637 times
Reputation: 29032

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If you live in a small enough town, where there are a limited number of jobs in your field, most people in that field probably already know you were fired. I'm aware of relatively personal and professional things about many people in my community I don't even know. But I know people who know them and any relatively attention-getting tale usually gets spread around. I've met many people for the first time and as I'm shaking their hand I'm thinking, "If you knew all the things I know about you, you would die of embarrassment right here."

If you are going to stay in your current home, I'd suggest it might be a wasted effort to lie about what happened to you. Be vague and hope they don't know but don't get caught in an outright untruth. If I were in your situation, I would move or accept the fact that I needed to leave my field.
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Old 11-16-2015, 08:01 PM
 
9,677 posts, read 15,855,639 times
Reputation: 16013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Geek View Post
Odds are if you get hired, they won't keep digging trying to find dirt on you. Either way, it's better to be employed and worry they may find out than not be employed.

Well, guess again. I had a job that wanted to get rid of me, mainly because I was an insurance risk---kept using the medical too much Ok, they went back on my original application, and tried to verify everything, after I had been there 3 years. They questioned I had a college degree, which I did, and had indicated such on my original application. A degree was not required, but desirable for the job.

My supervisor actually called me out, right in front of fellow employees, said she needed to see my college diploma. I asked why, she said well, if you ever read the fine print, it does say on the application if you are ever found to have lied on your application at any time in the future, you could be terminated. Ok, well, do you think I lied on the application? She just snapped at me she had the right to review my application at any time. Ok, sure....well, I couldn't find it immediately, I had put it away in storage. She demanded every day if I had my diploma. Not yet, I'm looking for it. She actually said
it also gives you time to have a fake one printed". I just laughed that off, because I knew I wasn't lying, just not making her a priority.

Finally, I found it, and brought it in. There again, she challenged me, right in front of my coworkers---it looks like a fake. Then I finally had enough. Not only are you accusing me of lying, now you are accusing me of forging a state document--the diploma was from Michigan State University, and I'm damned proud of it---no one is going to accuse me of forging what I bought literally with my own blood, sweat and tears. She then said she needed to make a copy. I told her no way was I putting it in her hands, and went "upstairs" (ever notice the head haunchos are always "upstairs"), and told them they could make a copy while I stood and watched, then I wanted it back, it was MY property, and I immediately took it out to my car and locked it up. Hey, I should trust them, when they didn't trust me?


Well, they finally managed to set me up to fire me, by then I was ready to get out, anyways. What's my point? Don't lie on an application, they can go back even years later, can be denied benefits, pension, etc.

However, OP, it depends o what they ask on the application. If they ask reason for leaving last job, you don't have to say you were fired. They asked YOUR reason for leaving. You can truthfully say some generic BS like didn't have opportunities for advancement---which it didn't if you were fired The trick is to learn NOT to lie, just don't tell the truth if its against you!

Good luck
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Old 11-16-2015, 08:27 PM
 
789 posts, read 1,680,053 times
Reputation: 1059
I agree with saying that you were laid off.

How big is your old company? Does everyone know that you were fired and why, or did they keep it quiet? I ask because I would think that your biggest area of exposure is if a hiring manager reaches out to someone in their network that works at your old company. Especially in a smaller town without a lot of large IT groups, this could be an issue.

That being said, it's always worth trying. Get your resume out there. Practice your story and answering interview questions. Make sure your shine in every other way in any interviews that you get, and hope for the best. Good luck!
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Old 11-16-2015, 09:05 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,457 posts, read 14,307,686 times
Reputation: 23204
Quote:
About the only information your old company will release is confirm your employment.
Or more to say, the only info they "should" release is your dates.
If they release any more, they could be sued by you for defamation of character.
NO
Quote:
If they slam you or say stuff that ends your chances their opening themselves up to get sued by you. Basically all and employer can do to avoid that is acknowledge you worked there but refuse a reference. If they do it you have leverage, but of course your in the wrong but this is basically your only play if their gonna hang you out to dry anyways.
NO
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
Here we go again. And again.

There are NO laws against an employer giving more information than employment dates to an inquiry. As long as it's not false. And don't think all companies are afraid to divulge the truth based on some fear of an imaginary lawsuit.

And there are many ways to screen an applicant where you don't even have to ask any detailed questions.

Take your chances OP, state the truth or embellished it a little.
YES!!

There is no law that says companies can't tell prospective employers that you are not eligible for rehire. It's concise and truthful, it's not slander or defamation, it's not an opening to a lawsuit.
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Old 11-16-2015, 09:08 PM
 
6,615 posts, read 3,742,110 times
Reputation: 13660
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbob01 View Post
So I got fired for doing something I shouldn't have done. It pertains to my job function and was basically snooping.
My question is that no one will ever hire me in the same line of work i had a long career in if I disclose any of this information.
Telling potential interviewers that I was "laid off" is a lie but I don't think my prior employer, HR, will state anything other than "yes he worked here".

Do I state on interviews that "made a mistake and was let go, learned from it..." or do I just lie and say I was "laid off". I understand if they find out I can be terminated again for not being honest on the job app.
What prospective employers will ask prior employers is "Would you hire him again?" That's the sneaky way of finding out if the worker left on good terms or may have been fired.

Snooping isn't THAT bad. It's not like stealing. Were you looking at someone's email account on the computer or something like that? Or rifling through a desk? That's bad, but not career ending.

Hard to say without knowing what you did exactly.
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Old 11-16-2015, 09:10 PM
 
18,858 posts, read 7,328,222 times
Reputation: 8066
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
What prospective employers will ask prior employers is "Would you hire him again?" That's the sneaky way of finding out if the worker left on good terms or may have been fired.

Snooping isn't THAT bad. It's not like stealing. Were you looking at someone's email account on the computer or something like that? Or rifling through a desk? That's bad, but not career ending.

Hard to say without knowing what you did exactly.
Nothing sneaky about a precise question with valuable insight into how an employee performed.
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Old 11-16-2015, 10:00 PM
 
581 posts, read 480,530 times
Reputation: 369
Why did you snoop?
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Old 11-17-2015, 06:05 AM
 
4,015 posts, read 5,063,377 times
Reputation: 3897
What's 'snooping?"
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Old 11-17-2015, 09:59 AM
 
8,009 posts, read 7,295,370 times
Reputation: 6387
One would think the company would have reprimanded him before it reached the point of terminating him. It sounds like you may have continued with the activity.

If the position requires some clearance for access to financial or personnel information, you're not going to get a job in the same capacity or even in the same area in another IT department.

I would look for work using the same hardware and software, be upfront about the mistake in interviews, and cut your salary requirements below the prevailing rate in your search.
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Old 11-17-2015, 12:33 PM
 
8,976 posts, read 8,099,396 times
Reputation: 19496
When a person is laid off, it can be due to cause (fired in your case), cut back number of employees, etc., etc.

You technically were laid off with cause. That is how you want to think, not think that you were fired.

Just say you were laid off, and you don't know how many were laid off in addition to you if asked.

Pitch your positives and skip the negatives in an interview unless a question is asked you don't lie about it.

Here is a decent article that may help you.

Laid Off, Fired, Quit, Resigned -- What's the Difference?
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