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Old 11-30-2015, 10:21 AM
 
204 posts, read 208,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
With 55K, you definitely won't be living high off the hog in NYC, but it will be enough to get by once your boyfriend gets a job.

At that point you're looking at 100K household, and that's more than enough to live decent.
Which is what I'm hoping for. This makes me feel much more confident that regardless of the job, salary wise we'll be okay. Definitely not rich by NYC standards, but enough where we can enjoy the city and eat more pasta every night.
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Old 11-30-2015, 10:26 AM
 
204 posts, read 208,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
Isn't that what you buy into when you work as a social worker for non-profits though?

Or at least a true non-profit. If non-profits are paying their administrative assistants 55K, then the directors are making 150K+, and then they cease to be non-profits because all of the contributions they receive are going towards salaries and not helping people.

55K is more than we pay our administrative assistants (way more), and we are a money hungry, privately owned engineering firm.
It's a laaaaaarge company, so I'd only be one of many clinical directors (they have like 6 different shelters.) The salary isn't ideal, but the job sounds like it is from what I know. I think I have to decide on the commute and location as well. Even though salary wise they are about the same, (and I'd still get an unlimited metro card, it's cheap and knowing myself I'll get lost or just want to travel a lot to use it when I'm not working) location wise, Midtown would be spot on. Jamaica has sketchy areas, and although the office is close to the train, I worry what it would be like late at night.
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
1,365 posts, read 1,445,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
Isn't that what you buy into when you work as a social worker for non-profits though?

Or at least a true non-profit. If non-profits are paying their administrative assistants 55K, then the directors are making 150K+, and then they cease to be non-profits because all of the contributions they receive are going towards salaries and not helping people.

55K is more than we pay our administrative assistants (way more), and we are a money hungry, privately owned engineering firm.
No, no, no, NO! "Nonprofit" means that there are no shareholders demanding a return on investment. The services exist to benefit the recipients, not the financial backers. It does NOT mean that the staff live in poverty. A responsible nonprofit will pay market wages--to attract quality staff, to retain competent employees, and because paying your workers a fair wage is the right thing to do. If the going salary in the market for a director with X years of experience and supervising Y employees is $150k, that is what a rational and responsible nonprofit will be paying.

(And to your comment, I would expect a "money hungry" firm to treat its employees more poorly than an organization founded on the very principle of having a social conscience.)
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:17 AM
 
204 posts, read 208,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StPaulGal View Post
No, no, no, NO! "Nonprofit" means that there are no shareholders demanding a return on investment. The services exist to benefit the recipients, not the financial backers. It does NOT mean that the staff live in poverty. A responsible nonprofit will pay market wages--to attract quality staff, to retain competent employees, and because paying your workers a fair wage is the right thing to do. If the going salary in the market for a director with X years of experience and supervising Y employees is $150k, that is what a rational and responsible nonprofit will be paying.

(And to your comment, I would expect a "money hungry" firm to treat its employees more poorly than an organization founded on the very principle of having a social conscience.)
Unfortunately, my experience with nonprofits is that they pay poorly. The higher ups tend to do well, but as it trickles down, the salary decreases. There just isn't a lot of funding available in these agencies, and often where there is, many of the employees are not the ones that benefit. It sucks, but it's the population I like working with (private practice is just not for me.)
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,459 posts, read 3,765,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fsu00 View Post
I'm in a situation that most would be lucky to have... I have three job offers and I don't know which to take. I'm relocating from Florida to NYC in January and all the jobs are willing to wait until I will be there to start. I'd love some input and see what you all would do. Obviously you can't make the decision for me and I don't have all the facts since I don't work there yet... but I don't know which offer to officially accept. I'm a social worker.

Job 1: In Jamaica, Queens - working as a clinical supervisor of a nonprofit that provides in-home counseling to at risk youth. Salary is 50k. However, I was informed that I would have the opportunity to advance to the program director position within a few months, which would jump my salary to $72k. The employees here seem wonderful and they offer a lot of training. I felt very comfortable during the interview and they seemed to very transparent about the organization and what it's goals are.

Job 2: In Midtown, Manhattan - working as the clinical director of a shelter for a large nonprofit agency. Salary is $55k. I would oversee the entire program. The location is ideal since we want to live in Manhattan. I love what this agency does and the people seemed really nice. It will be a tough job, but I'd learn a lot.

Job 3: Remote position, office is based in NYC - working as a clinical supervisor for a crisis hot line. Salary is $55k. I could have odd hours at times and work nights. You work from home so while they offer a lot of support via the phone/computer, there is minimal face-to-face contact. The company is growing quickly and it could be a good opportunity.

For all three jobs, I would be taking a pay cut (I make about $62k in Florida.) However, I'd be giving up my car, saving me about $700/month (of course, this will just go towards rent now.)

I'm torn on what job to accept. I've unofficially accepted the first job, but I just don't know if it's the right fit. Yes, the money would be great, but starting out my salary would be just pitiful (not that the other two are that great either.) I've been going back and forth, made a pros/cons list, and I just can't make a decision. My boyfriend is an attorney who will hopefully find a job once we move (he works as an attorney in Florida, but we're waiting for his bar clearance.) That will help financially, since surviving on $50-55k in NYC is not very much. We have about $40k saved which would be used for emergencies only.

Anyway, I know this is a long shot, but I'm curious as to what job you would accept based on the information I provided. Sometimes I wish someone would just tell me what to do lol
#1. The opportunity to advance is key for any job.

If you have never worked from home before, I think it may suck for you. It works for people that already have good family and social networks, but if you don't, you miss the "social" part of going to work. This is particularly important when moving to a new area, where work will be where you meet your first friends probably. One of my colleagues quit a remote job where she actually made more than she does now, but as she put it, her life sucked and 20K a year is not worth that. You're looking at only a 5K bump. Probably not worth it. Work-from-home jobs are tough because you can easily get consumed by it & never stop working.

55K is poverty in Manhattan. You'll live there but not be able to do anything. I feel like with Queens options for slightly less expensive housing may present themselves.
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:26 AM
 
3,772 posts, read 2,128,856 times
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Originally Posted by fsu00 View Post
I appreciate the response, although it was not what I was looking for. 50k is not a lot, I'm also a social worker and will never make it rich in this field. I want to leave Florida because it's time for a change. Now, if you're going to take the time to respond, please answer the question I asked about what job would be more appealing. For most people, it would probably be none, and that's fair.. this field isn't for everyone.


Do you realize how expensive NYC is? Any of those three position you may take, I hope you get 3-4 roommates. That will be the ONLY way you will be able to survive there off that salary. Unless of you course you live in some tenement or boarding house.

I wouldn't even consider anywhere near or around NYC unless I was getting 6 figures. My advice, is pass on all 3. And don't always believe there is "room to grow" at alot of these places. A lot of places just say that. Ive seen it happen over the year where they get the "company ra ra!" about "opportunity this," opportunity that" and you have people stuck in the same job for a decade or more.


And what if things don't go through with your boyfriend? Then you're stuck in NYC making a poverty wage salary relative to the area. I would pass.
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:30 AM
 
694 posts, read 951,746 times
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With job #1, you could save a bit on rent if you are going to reside in Queens, however, most of the areas in Queens are considered to be two-fare zone when it comes to commute, that is, to get into the city, you would need to either take bus/car, followed by subway, which means that to commute within Queens itself, you would need a car.

With job #2, you can certainly live in Manhattan, or, you could also live in Queens, there are parts that literally take 20 minutes to get to Midtown, again, rent savings.

With job #3, while the pay is a bit more, I agree, it's a bit isolating to work from home, plus, the unpredictable hours might take its toll on your health, so definitely pass on this one.

What kind of attorney is your boyfriend? You will largely be relying on his compensation to afford living in NYC, even in Queens, surviving on 50K when you will be shelling out at least 1.2-1.5K for an apartment is tough.
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:34 AM
 
204 posts, read 208,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DorianRo View Post
Do you realize how expensive NYC is? Any of those three position you may take, I hope you get 3-4 roommates. That will be the ONLY way you will be able to survive there off that salary. Unless of you course you live in some tenement or boarding house.

I wouldn't even consider anywhere near or around NYC unless I was getting 6 figures. My advice, is pass on all 3. And don't always believe there is "room to grow" at alot of these places. A lot of places just say that. Ive seen it happen over the year where they get the "company ra ra!" about "opportunity this," opportunity that" and you have people stuck in the same job for a decade or more.
My boyfriend will eventually find a job, and then we'll make over 100k together (he's an attorney.) So, even a low paying attorney job would allow us to live just fine roommates. Still, that's not a lot by NY standards and I understand that. I'm not looking to live in the trendiest or fanciest place. We're open to other areas, but from what I've seen on sites like streeteasy and naked apartments, we could find a studio/1 bedroom for $2500, which we could do once he has a job. Until then, we're staying in Airbnb (we have one now set up for Woodside Queens) or we will try to sublet.

I've been lucky and I've had the exact opposite experience as you-I've grown in every company I've been in. I do believe what she says about the promotion (they can't hire from within that office for certain reasons-it's why they are willing to take me being out of state for a management position as it is,) but the time frame is still an unknown factor.
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:40 AM
 
204 posts, read 208,394 times
Reputation: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by babysladkaya View Post
With job #1, you could save a bit on rent if you are going to reside in Queens, however, most of the areas in Queens are considered to be two-fare zone when it comes to commute, that is, to get into the city, you would need to either take bus/car, followed by subway, which means that to commute within Queens itself, you would need a car.

With job #2, you can certainly live in Manhattan, or, you could also live in Queens, there are parts that literally take 20 minutes to get to Midtown, again, rent savings.

With job #3, while the pay is a bit more, I agree, it's a bit isolating to work from home, plus, the unpredictable hours might take its toll on your health, so definitely pass on this one.

What kind of attorney is your boyfriend? You will largely be relying on his compensation to afford living in NYC, even in Queens, surviving on 50K when you will be shelling out at least 1.2-1.5K for an apartment is tough.

Depending on where we live, I don't think that's necessarily true. We have an apartment in Woodside right now, and will be near 2 subway lines. Obviously when we get a place of our own, our goal will be to live somewhere near transportation. There are 3 subway lines, plus the LIRR that would take me into work, so I'd have options in Jamaica. Yes, I'll probably have to transfer trains at some point, but that's not an issue for me (at least it's not now, I may change my mind once it happens.)

Right now he does foreclosure law, but he'd be open to any job in NYC. He knows he'll have to start at the bottom since he doesn't have years of experience or any specific specialty. Before this current job I have, I was making 50k and paid 1200 for rent (my portion), plus 700 a month in a car/insurance/gas, plus groceries, going out to eat, etc. And I still somehow managed to save. So, I know it's definitely doable. NYC is only more expensive when it comes to rent (well, more money for a much smaller space); groceries wise, it's the same as South Florida (I know for a fact, I've shopped at both places and compared prices, there isn't much of a difference.)
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:53 AM
 
7,387 posts, read 11,563,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fsu00 View Post
My boyfriend will eventually find a job, and then we'll make over 100k together (he's an attorney.) So, even a low paying attorney job would allow us to live just fine roommates. Still, that's not a lot by NY standards and I understand that. I'm not looking to live in the trendiest or fanciest place. We're open to other areas, but from what I've seen on sites like streeteasy and naked apartments, we could find a studio/1 bedroom for $2500, which we could do once he has a job. Until then, we're staying in Airbnb (we have one now set up for Woodside Queens) or we will try to sublet.

I've been lucky and I've had the exact opposite experience as you-I've grown in every company I've been in. I do believe what she says about the promotion (they can't hire from within that office for certain reasons-it's why they are willing to take me being out of state for a management position as it is,) but the time frame is still an unknown factor.
Don't believe anybody who says 55K is poverty in NYC (a city of 8 million plus people and the largest city in the US).

Since you are a social worker, think about that, and process that statement for a second.
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