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Old 12-05-2015, 10:19 AM
 
3,764 posts, read 3,508,882 times
Reputation: 8938

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bea555 View Post
Does sending a form rejection letter take a lot of time and effort? I get not wanting to email everyone that sent an application or had a phone interview, but I feel on site interviews are different. I would rather have someone tell me that they are busy and if I don't hear from them within a week, that meant that I didn't get the job.
Yes it takes time and effort. Realistically... keep looking, keep interviewing, and don't just sit by the phone--that's a recipe for frustration.
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Old 12-07-2015, 08:59 PM
 
1,871 posts, read 1,669,681 times
Reputation: 2865
I had another recruiter blow me off again today. Really frustrating, but gotta move on and keep applying. I did follow up with an e-mail, expressing my interest in the company. I was talking to my brother about it and he said that recruiters have no respect for my time. He thinks they gave the job to someone else. Who knows. This really wares me down.
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Old 12-08-2015, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,651 posts, read 17,623,979 times
Reputation: 27738
This twilight zone is why I'm hesitant to spend long amounts of time on full applications, especially with companies I've never heard of. There are too many places to apply with something like Indeed Easy Apply to spend an hour filling out forms and personality tests.
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Old 12-08-2015, 11:10 AM
mcq
 
Location: Memphis, TN
336 posts, read 546,426 times
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I've found (in my experience) more often than not, that if I have interviewed with someone, I will eventually learn my status, even if I have to take the initiative to followup after a certain amount of time. It could take up to several weeks or so. But those who don't, come across as very unprofessional or disrespectful. As a candidate, you just have to shrug your shoulders and move on. Of course, after you've been unsuccessful for the umpteenth time, that can get difficult as well, regardless if everyone has shown proper courtesy or not.
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Old 12-08-2015, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,651 posts, read 17,623,979 times
Reputation: 27738
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcq View Post
I've found (in my experience) more often than not, that if I have interviewed with someone, I will eventually learn my status, even if I have to take the initiative to followup after a certain amount of time. It could take up to several weeks or so. But those who don't, come across as very unprofessional or disrespectful. As a candidate, you just have to shrug your shoulders and move on. Of course, after you've been unsuccessful for the umpteenth time, that can get difficult as well, regardless if everyone has shown proper courtesy or not.
I think if you make it to the phone or face-to-face interviews, someone ought to at least call or email and inform you directly of a rejection.
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Old 12-11-2015, 06:01 PM
 
1,248 posts, read 2,991,204 times
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My experience:

Companies that post jobs on Craigslist (legitimate jobs that is, non scammy) have no HR departments and no procedures and it all comes down to whether or not they're gutless wonders as to whether they send you a notice you weren't chosen. And if you're too small a company to have a generic e-mail account where you can send generic "thanks but no thanks" notice, maybe I can see not wanting to deal with the odd nasty response from a disgruntled job seeker. But if you're not using a generic account to communicate with applicants in the first place, maybe you should.

I never expect a response of any kind from an employer if I have merely applied. I don't even expect a response after a phone interview. I do get annoyed when someone doesn't send a polite email after an in-person interview... But sometimes that happens. And not sending any notice after two in-person interviews is effing ridiculous.

But it depends on the hiring process. If I have reached the end stage of the process, made it to the final round of interviews (whether it's one, two or three plus)... And I don't get at least an email and am left hanging, well f--- them and the horses they rode in on. That is the type of thing that will not only make me avoid doing business with their company in the future, but I will never suggest their company and its products/services to others.
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Old 12-11-2015, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Planet Telex
4,677 posts, read 2,301,443 times
Reputation: 4396
It's reasonable not to expect a response after a phone interview; after all, it's simply a screening process. However, I do think it's professional etiquette to send a notification email to rejected candidates who have had at least one face-to-face interview with a firm. Some people have gone on multiple interviews and were met with complete silence. That's gotta be pretty rude, especially when the process has become quite personable at that point. And as Jerome above me points out, I think such a negative impression can spread, meaning candidates will talk.

Kudos to the hiring managers on the forum who do notify candidates who haven't moved on. I wish there were more of these types out in the real world.
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Old 12-11-2015, 09:44 PM
 
468 posts, read 518,888 times
Reputation: 517
Once upon a time I took a proofreading class, and then dutifully faxed my resume off to every proofreader-hiring agency the teacher had recommended.

None of them sent me an application or asked me to interview with them. None. Radio silence. From a dozen.

The experience happened with a friend who applied for writing and editing jobs, with experience and clips in hand. About 200 companies, and one rejection letter. One. 199 of them, gave not a peep.

Sad to say, these instances date from the oughts and nineties, respectively, so it may be somewhat an illusion that jobs used to be easy/ier to get.
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Old 12-11-2015, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,514,750 times
Reputation: 9889
I think in the nineties, at least in my field, the people who selected candidates and made offers were the actual hiring managers. That made all the difference in the hiring process.
Now there is this inefficient and ineffective ''middle man'' called ''HR'' that just compounds the selection and offer problems in getting someone hired.
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Old 12-13-2015, 12:57 AM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,727,171 times
Reputation: 4944
i think it's really rude and inconsiderate to not get back to applicants, especially ones who have interviewed.

i used to manage applicant screening for the ED of a very small nonprofit and with some organization (just a spreadsheet with each applicant's info in it) it was not a big effort at all to e-mail out rejections each time we eliminated people from the applicant pool.

with hr software like taleo, brassring etc it is BEYOND EASY, it takes seconds. granted i don't think personalized e-mails are really necessary for anyone other than the top 3 or so. even then, it's better to get a generic rejection than nothing.

if hiring managers are afraid that people will send e-mails back, use a no reply address. or just ignore the nasty e-mails and know that the majority of people who get the e-mails, while they are surely disappointed, appreciate on some level that they are getting closure.

however, there is really not much we can do as job applicants to change this, besides not being the person who sends back that nasty/defensive response to a rejection. and if we ever end up in a position that's involved in the hiring process, we can set an example and push for change.
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