U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-13-2015, 06:28 PM
 
1,246 posts, read 2,988,715 times
Reputation: 1824

Advertisements

My experience with notifications has actually been far more positive with big companies than with small businesses. It's just a rote form mail that probably went out to a lot of applicants or interviewees, but it's appreciated. I don't need to hear the reason why they passed on me, since they probably had a lot of people applying anyway.

Or, at least I appreciate having the ability to log in to an applicant system and check the status that way, if that's what they do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-15-2015, 08:28 AM
 
2,183 posts, read 1,732,002 times
Reputation: 1833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessica2099 View Post
When I started making hiring decisions, I tried calling rejected people.... only to be hung up on by too many people as soon as I mentioned it.

When I started making hiring decisions, I tried emailing rejected people.... only to get a handful of responses being called a b**** or that I hired my best friend... or that they wish something bad on me.

I tried. Your fellow applicants ruined it. The amount of people that seemed to truly appreciate the notice does not make up for it.

It's much easier not to call or email at all.
Your concluding sentence clearly says it all. You were looking for an excuse to stop doing this and you found it through the actions of a few. How petty. You need to grow up and ignore twits like this as most professionals do. A simple form letter will suffice and take little of your time to both create and send to rejectees. Calling was a bad idea from the get go.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2015, 08:38 AM
 
2,183 posts, read 1,732,002 times
Reputation: 1833
Quote:
Originally Posted by blisterpeanuts View Post
Yes it takes time and effort. Realistically... keep looking, keep interviewing, and don't just sit by the phone--that's a recipe for frustration.
A simple form letter takes only a few moments of your time to create and can be saved for use. Then all that is necessary is to put in the name and address of the rejected applicant and press click to send. It's called professionalism.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2015, 08:42 AM
 
2,085 posts, read 1,858,791 times
Reputation: 2685
Quote:
Originally Posted by jma501 View Post
A simple form letter takes only a few moments of your time to create and can be saved for use. Then all that is necessary is to put in the name and address of the rejected applicant and press click to send. It's called professionalism.
I agree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2015, 01:45 PM
 
3,764 posts, read 3,505,017 times
Reputation: 8938
Quote:
Originally Posted by jma501 View Post
Your concluding sentence clearly says it all. You were looking for an excuse to stop doing this and you found it through the actions of a few. How petty. You need to grow up and ignore twits like this as most professionals do. A simple form letter will suffice and take little of your time to both create and send to rejectees. Calling was a bad idea from the get go.
Little wonder she stopped going the extra mile and being nice to rejected applicants, when they have such a nasty attitude. She's not the one who needs to grow up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jma501 View Post
A simple form letter takes only a few moments of your time to create and can be saved for use. Then all that is necessary is to put in the name and address of the rejected applicant and press click to send. It's called professionalism.
It's optional, obviously. I prefer hearing back, but have given up waiting to hear back, and I just move on. They moved on, too, so why should I sit around steaming about it.

Honestly, people, you have to grow a thicker hide if you want to survive out there. Professionalism isn't about sending form letters. Professionalism is about handling stress, disappointment, and failure as smoothly as you handle success.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2015, 02:09 PM
 
2,079 posts, read 2,605,195 times
Reputation: 3947
had an interview last Monday. thought it went well but haven't heard anything back. easily my best interview performance ever. I followed up yesterday and got a machine. they said they wanted to fill the position before the end of the year at the interview. its pretty much the best company in the city. company paid medical, a pay bump, and only 3 city blocks from my apartment.


i sent them a thank you email the same day. this isn't a good sign.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2015, 06:43 PM
 
Location: ohio
2,745 posts, read 1,319,549 times
Reputation: 3128
Quote:
Originally Posted by misskittytalks View Post
Once upon a time I took a proofreading class, and then dutifully faxed my resume off to every proofreader-hiring agency the teacher had recommended.

None of them sent me an application or asked me to interview with them. None. Radio silence. From a dozen.

The experience happened with a friend who applied for writing and editing jobs, with experience and clips in hand. About 200 companies, and one rejection letter. One. 199 of them, gave not a peep.

Sad to say, these instances date from the oughts and nineties, respectively, so it may be somewhat an illusion that jobs used to be easy/ier to get.
When I was last job searching in the 80s and early 90s, it was extremely rare to hear back that you did not get a job even after an interview. No interview - forget about it, you never heard back. I was looking at low level engineering postions as I have a 2 yr degree, may have been different at higher levels.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2015, 07:09 PM
 
2,183 posts, read 1,732,002 times
Reputation: 1833
Quote:
Originally Posted by blisterpeanuts View Post
Little wonder she stopped going the extra mile and being nice to rejected applicants, when they have such a nasty attitude. She's not the one who needs to grow up.


Being a professional means being able to handle difficult people. However, I am not excusing the idiots responsible for the nasty emails.




It's optional, obviously. I prefer hearing back, but have given up waiting to hear back, and I just move on. They moved on, too, so why should I sit around steaming about it.

Honestly, people, you have to grow a thicker hide if you want to survive out there. Professionalism isn't about sending form letters. Professionalism is about handling stress, disappointment, and failure as smoothly as you handle success.
Actually professionalism is all these things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2015, 06:43 AM
 
1,544 posts, read 2,068,646 times
Reputation: 1185
There is absolutely nothing wrong with a generic rejection response, something along the lines of:

"Dear Applicant,

Thank you for taking the time to interview with us. However we have decided to pursue more qualified candidates. We wish you the best of luck in your future job search. "

Done, that's it, that is all the job applicant is asking. You don't need to write paragraphs explaining in great detail why I was not hired, heck you don't even have to use my name when writing the rejection letter.

For my experience it has been a mixed bag, but I find the "bigger" companies tend to respond more than the smaller companies.

Look big or small, to the HR out there, I believe that by at least sending out the rejection email, its acknowledgement its at least a sign of humanity.

But with rejection emails being optional, I get why you don't send them out, I just wish you did at least let the job seeker know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2015, 07:12 AM
 
454 posts, read 400,424 times
Reputation: 378
Looking back at all the job interviews iv had and job offers I have gotten. It typically worked out that if I got the job I heard something very quickly. I don't think I have ever gotten an offer after interviewing and waiting days.

For me if I don't hear something that day or the next, I pretty much say to myself that it didn't happen and ill push forward with other interviews.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top