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Old 12-05-2015, 04:03 PM
 
1,168 posts, read 712,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroWord View Post
Here is something that schools don't tell you. Your degree actually become stale after some time of not working in the field after school. The time limit is right about 3 years.
3 years? More like 3 months. It may be possible to get a job that uses your degree after 1 year, but you won't be competitive for any good jobs that use your degree after that period.
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Old 12-05-2015, 04:10 PM
 
1,455 posts, read 1,232,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magicturtle View Post
Yes, sometimes if you are starting a new career you take the job anywhere it is. The OP's daughter doesn't sound incredibly proactive though so will probably continue her current job. That might be the real issue. Or maybe they finished the degree and don't like the work but don't want to confess that to mom.
Maybe so. I looked myself and saw a software support position for env sci software, in Ashville NC. So that's something that's not even "in the field" and maybe that's not her cup of tea either, but There are a lot of worse places to live than Asheville and it buys some time if she doesn't want to do fieldwork and wants to get her foot in the door.
To KonaldDuth's point, this may be true too, but I'd exhaust all the possibilities first before throwing in the towel. What's done is done.
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Old 12-05-2015, 05:25 PM
 
5,169 posts, read 2,615,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KonaldDuth View Post
3 years? More like 3 months. It may be possible to get a job that uses your degree after 1 year, but you won't be competitive for any good jobs that use your degree after that period.
Well, one's hirability does decrease significantly after the first 3 months, but I would argue that it's not impossible to get a job after the 3 months period. That said, after 3 years, it would take an act of god to convince an employer that your degree is still any good.
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Old 12-05-2015, 07:51 PM
 
5,163 posts, read 2,790,187 times
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My daughter has friends with that degree or similar & they got jobs with their county's vector control...career path, good benefits. Another one is working with the government to restore polluted areas (marshlands, beaches, etc.) to their original condition & has even started his own consulting business. He is also pursuing a Master's in that field...your daughter may need to do that.
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Old 12-05-2015, 07:53 PM
 
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chemical plants, power companies, government
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Old 12-05-2015, 10:40 PM
 
3,154 posts, read 1,461,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magicturtle View Post
I am not sure anyone said useless, but she has no practical experience and apparently such limited knowledge about the field itself that she doesn't even know where to begin a job search. If she begins to volunteer somewhere she can get experience and see what she does and doesn't like. I would not start a masters program without experience because then all you get is more education and still no experience.
By all means, if she can find somewhere to volunteer related to her major to build experience, of course she should do it. I recommended the master's because with environmental science, you tend to gain experience through field work and there is plenty of that with this major. Even at bachelor's level, there is generally a lot of required field work. It would help make her more competitive towards jobs and if not, at least an internship.

As others have recommended, she should get in touch with her university and find out if the department has heard from any companies trying to recruit. Usually they e-mail you these things. Actually, has she contacted them to see if any professors are conducting any research she can be a part of?
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Old 12-06-2015, 03:27 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,514 posts, read 2,890,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KonaldDuth View Post
3 years? More like 3 months. It may be possible to get a job that uses your degree after 1 year, but you won't be competitive for any good jobs that use your degree after that period.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroWord View Post
Well, one's hirability does decrease significantly after the first 3 months, but I would argue that it's not impossible to get a job after the 3 months period. That said, after 3 years, it would take an act of god to convince an employer that your degree is still any good.
3 months!? Is this also true with experienced employees? 9 months seems to be the average time to get a job these days.


0 - 3 months to get a job is expected
3 - 6 months.. not ideal, but still not too shabby
6 - 12 months... it's getting there
12+ months looks more suspicious, and you should be prepared to ask why you've been out of work for so long.




I don't know much about env. sci. degrees, but at least with some tech jobs, you can always do work on your own time, even if it isn't experience from an actual degree from a job. Should be akin to volunteer work.
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Old 12-06-2015, 06:12 AM
 
5,267 posts, read 5,189,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goin' Coastal View Post
She could check into public sector positions in areas such as water/wastewater treatment (inspectors) and the health dept., say for restaurant inspectors. Those are 2 ideas that come to mind.
^This. My sister also graduated with an environmental science degree. It took her awhile but eventually she was able to get a job with the city (water treatment) and has moved up into management over the years. The pay was not very good at first (she had a second part-time job since she lived alone and had a lot of things to pay on) but now she has a house, travels, etc.
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Old 12-06-2015, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Princeton, New Jersey
515 posts, read 870,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Her problem is she doesnt know what to do with it ,doesnt know what job categories to apply for.
Shes been out of school for 3 years now and has been working as a non emergency dispatch operator for the local city, she finds the job boring and wants to move on..
Any suggestions to help her out?
Three big companies that do environmental cleanup and compliance that she could apply to, off the top of my head. These are large nation-wide to world wide companies but there are tons of small firms, too. If she is interested in environmental cleanup, best states are NJ, CA, and MA as the state standards are very strict which means clean ups take more time and are more involved.

Tetra Tech
AECOM
AMEC Foster & Wheeler

Could also try government agencies like EPA, health department, state environmental protection agency, etc.
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Old 12-06-2015, 10:49 AM
 
5,169 posts, read 2,615,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
3 months!? Is this also true with experienced employees? 9 months seems to be the average time to get a job these days.


0 - 3 months to get a job is expected
3 - 6 months.. not ideal, but still not too shabby
6 - 12 months... it's getting there
12+ months looks more suspicious, and you should be prepared to ask why you've been out of work for so long.
No, that doesn't hold true for experienced workers. I was talking about straight out of college degree.

For experienced workers, it's a bit more complicated than that. One can be out of the loop for many years and still get hired. While the determining factor for straight out of college degrees without any experience in the said field is time, the determining factor for experienced workers that's been unemployed is what they've done during the long stretch of unemployment.

Believe it or not, employers give a lot of break to stay-at-home mom and dad professionals.

If you are a long term unemployed professional, just make sure you can answer coherently what you've been doing without sounding like you're making up excuses.
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