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Old 12-09-2015, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,714 posts, read 17,668,720 times
Reputation: 27783

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Nope. EVERY SINGLE PERSON you meet and talk to is part of the interview process. I get a report from HR about their interactions with candidates. It is only informational, as the hiring decision rests with me, but if HR were to tell me that you had been inappropriate, too familiar, or simply unprofessional that would become one of the factors that I consider.
I think one of the general, large problems in the hiring process is that basic questions most people would ask getting to know someone in a setting other than employment are frowned upon, if not outright prohibited, in a workplace.

Our small office has no HR staff and HR typically isn't involved in employee interviews here. There is a recruiter, but the recruiter is an employee of the division they recruit for, not HR. That said, the recruiter is the initial screener and if the candidate is bad, they won't move forward.

We have multiple people interview the candidate partly to see if the story stays straight. We had an excellent candidate who admitted to one person he had hung up on a client to leave early. We've all done it, but you don't admit it in an interview. Needless to say, he wasn't hired.

Still, I don't like the stiffness of the modern interview process. You need to get some feel of the person and often red tape and liberal rules get in the way.
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Old 12-09-2015, 09:15 PM
 
19,019 posts, read 7,397,137 times
Reputation: 8113
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Nope. EVERY SINGLE PERSON you meet and talk to is part of the interview process. I get a report from HR about their interactions with candidates. It is only informational, as the hiring decision rests with me, but if HR were to tell me that you had been inappropriate, too familiar, or simply unprofessional that would become one of the factors that I consider.
.


My last 3 employers did the same thing. We asked everyone who interviewed candidates their thoughts, and if any said "I wouldn't hire him/her", even if other 4 or 5 said "he/she is ok or better", the candidate was never hired.
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Old 12-09-2015, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,039 posts, read 8,455,286 times
Reputation: 15668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I think one of the general, large problems in the hiring process is that basic questions most people would ask getting to know someone in a setting other than employment are frowned upon, if not outright prohibited, in a workplace.
Nothing is prohibited. You can ask, answer and discuss anything during an interview. Talk all you want about race or religion. You cannot make decisions based upon this information, which is why people avoid the topics. The discussion leaves all parties open to allegations of misconduct. Avoid the topic entirely and you avoid not only possible disputes, but you also let the employer know that you have appropriate levels of discretion.

Quote:
Still, I don't like the stiffness of the modern interview process. You need to get some feel of the person and often red tape and liberal rules get in the way.
Liberal rules? I presume you are a conservative and advocate discrimination? That is what you are implying. Why else would you need to know a person's marital status in order to make a decision.
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Old 12-09-2015, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,714 posts, read 17,668,720 times
Reputation: 27783
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Nothing is prohibited. You can ask, answer and discuss anything during an interview. Talk all you want about race or religion. You cannot make decisions based upon this information, which is why people avoid the topics. The discussion leaves all parties open to allegations of misconduct. Avoid the topic entirely and you avoid not only possible disputes, but you also let the employer know that you have appropriate levels of discretion.



Liberal rules? I presume you are a conservative and advocate discrimination? That is what you are implying. Why else would you need to know a person's marital status in order to make a decision.
The simple fact that such a controversial topic was brought up invites a problem. Because someone brought it up, that fact is going to be evidence of discriminating on the topic. If I ask someone if they are married, they don't like it, then complain, the fact that I brought it up is going to be used against, even though as you say technically the mere fact of raising the question is not prohibited. I'm surprised at that level of naivete from a senior professional.

I'm not advocating discriminating against people on any parameters. I just advocate a more open discussion without fear of retribution from some litigious nutjob.
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Old 12-09-2015, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,039 posts, read 8,455,286 times
Reputation: 15668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
The simple fact that such a controversial topic was brought up invites a problem. Because someone brought it up, that fact is going to be evidence of discriminating on the topic. If I ask someone if they are married, they don't like it, then complain, the fact that I brought it up is going to be used against, even though as you say technically the mere fact of raising the question is not prohibited. I'm surprised at that level of naivete from a senior professional.

I'm not advocating discriminating against people on any parameters. I just advocate a more open discussion without fear of retribution from some litigious nutjob.
Your thinking is so muddled and incoherent that it is hard to respond.

Talking about a protected class is not evidence of discrimination. It is simply an opportunity for discrimination.

Yes, if you ask questions about marriage status it leaves you open for complaints. I did say that, when I wrote
"The discussion leaves all parties open to allegations of misconduct". How does that make me naive? I know the law, I know that it isn't a prohibited topic of conversation, and I also stated reasons why you would want to avoid the subjects. Sounds like reality to me, not naïveté.
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Old 12-09-2015, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,159,071 times
Reputation: 7075
Just finished preparing for my 3.5 hour interview tomorrow here in Columbus.

All I do is research and learn about the company (history, business structure, products, financial facts, etc.). Then, I come up with a bunch of potential questions that I might ask for each appropriate person.

I do not really spend much time rehearsing or preparing answers to questions, because I have interviewed SO many times over the past year and prior years that it's ingrained in my mind how to answer questions and talk about things. Plus, I'm a believer in that answers should come naturally, as long as I keep it positive and be enthusiastic, smile and be personable, etc.

Yay!
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Old 12-10-2015, 12:43 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,582 posts, read 14,373,391 times
Reputation: 23532
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I'm not worried about it. You guys are WAY too old school and by the book with everything.
Isn't that the sort of thinking that got you terminated from your last job?
You don't know what the culture is of the company you are interviewing for. Stay conservative and old school until you know that it's okay to do otherwise.
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Old 12-10-2015, 03:57 AM
 
19,019 posts, read 7,397,137 times
Reputation: 8113
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post




You don't know what the culture is of the company you are interviewing for. Stay conservative and old school until you know that it's okay to do otherwise.

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Old 12-10-2015, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,159,071 times
Reputation: 7075
I don't want to work for a company that's conservative and old school anyway. I'm progressive and hip.
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Old 12-10-2015, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,039 posts, read 8,455,286 times
Reputation: 15668
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I don't want to work for a company that's conservative and old school anyway. I'm progressive and hip.
Tax accounting as a profession is not known for its hipster vibe. Most CFOs are going to want things done legally and correctly, they won't be too concerned about your personal flair.

Remember that companies are comprised of people. Some will be conservative, others progressive. You will work with both, and sometimes both characteristics reside in the same person. How you present yourself once you have the job is one thing, I am trying to give you some insight so that you can maximize your chances of getting the job.

You have criticized me for being conservative and old school. That is true in some senses. A great deal of my job has to do with compliance and budgetary responsibilities. Because I have a great deal of authority over those who work in my department, and in some respects over people who don't even report to me, I have to be careful how I approach things. I can set my employer up for a lawsuit or fines if I do something wrong, I can be the target of union grievances, or somebody can get hurt. This lends itself to a certain conservative approach. Yet I am also one f the most liberal people you are likely to meet. I think that Bernie Sanders needs to stop waffling and punch it up a bit. The GSA on campus is way too timid for my thought. I could go on. But when hiring somebody, I would be cautious about offering a position to somebody who did not know the appropriate boundaries.
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