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Old 12-14-2015, 01:39 PM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,718,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minethatbird View Post
Well they didn't like you enough to hire you. It just seemed silly.
well just because they liked someone else more doesn't mean they don't like you enough to hire you for something else in the future. you could have been a really close second.

i've gotten the "we'll keep your resume on file" thing dozens of time and i've gotten called about another position (or maybe the same position a few months later, i forget) just once. another time i didn't get the job but the hiring manager told hr how great i was and i ended up with an hr person who was actively looking out for openings that were a good fit for me at the school (it was a large university) and encouraging hiring managers to interview me for them.

i also got rejected from my job before last and then was called back and offered the job when the person they hired didn't show up for their first day of work!

i think "we'll keep your resume on file" is a standard thing that employers often say and usually doesn't really mean anything, especially if you didn't even interview. but on occasion i think it's totally plausible for a hiring manager to interview someone they really like but don't hire because someone else is or seems better, and when they need someone else for a similar role (or when the first choice doesn't work out) they go back to that person to see if they're still available. i don't think it happens that often, but it does happen.
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Old 12-14-2015, 01:44 PM
 
427 posts, read 379,632 times
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Saying "we'll keep your application on file" just sounds much more polite than "we'll keep your application in eternal damnation."
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Old 12-14-2015, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,177 posts, read 11,797,310 times
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I've gotten a job where the first place person didn't work out and they called me. That's when it was known the other person wasn't going to work out VERY quickly, though, not a few months down the road.
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Old 12-14-2015, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
12,184 posts, read 10,368,595 times
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It's a polite way of giving you bad news.
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Old 12-14-2015, 05:34 PM
 
684 posts, read 376,222 times
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I'm one of those people who use to work in HR and was in the position of telling numerous applicants "we'll keep your application / resume on file"

There are several reasons for this

Often times there is just one position opened and we were looking for a specific person for that job. You would be surprised at the many different applicants that would interview for the position just out of desperation for work but not fitting the actual job opening. Even if we thought we had found "the right person" for the particular job opening we would continue the job search for another week or two just to see what else came in. This forced us to tell many applicants weíll call you back or keep you resume on file. We wanted the overall general interview process to last a while if for any reason just to get the most for our money spent form the advertising and job postings that we paid for and to fish for resumes.

During an interview mental notes as well as actual notes were taken on each applicant. Short interviews are always a bad sign for any applicant. I could list the causes of short interviews and it would be a long list.

A person can have an incredible resume with more qualifications and experience than any other applicant and have a great presentation and appearance but can blow the job interview with one simple question, such as starting out by asking "What is the compensation / pay?"

This is a huge turn off for HR personnel because it told us up front that this person was more concerned with what they would get out of the job than what they could give to the job. Often times asking the salary or benefits will simply cause the interview to shut down and you'll be labeled as a needy taker and not a company giver. Often times we found it very refreshing when during the entire interview process an applicant never asked us about the salary or benefits and all we discussed were past history and qualifications and other related issues. If we concluded the interview without the topic of pay ever coming up it was a given (if they met the qualifications we were looking for) that we always called them back for a second interview.

The bottom line is we were always looking for people who wanted to grow with the company and move into other positions. We became good at screening out those people who we thought were simply looking for filler work (or short timers) because for us it would cost money to train them, hire them, go through the entire corporate package only to learn they wanted to work for only 3-6 months until they found another job and then leave. That would then force us to start the interview process all over again so if we even got a hint of this we would not hire them. There are always tell-tale signs of who these people are.

In regards to "We'll keep your application on file" we really would. After an interview the completed notes were made and attached to the individualsí application / resume and while the person might not be a fit for the job opening we were hiring for we would often feel that person was a better fit in another position which simply wasn't available at that moment in time. We also had a secret code that we marked each resume with that indicated how well the person interviewed.

During the interview we used other tactics to gain additional information which we had to be very careful on asking due to the law but these tactics often yielded us important information that could often times actually help the applicant with being offered the position.



While resumes containing a lot of experience can be impressive what sells any company on the person applying is more the actual person rather than their qualifications.



Something else that always stood out for me was individuals who submitted a head-shot of themselves on nice glossy photo stock with a bio on the back. This indicated they valued our company to give us (spend their money on such an expense when they probably didnít have it) something to set them apart from others. Looking at the images later gave us an idea of who it was again and always stood out as being an added professional courtesy.



If you are called up even weeks later or months later donít automatically assume the first choice didnít work out. There were times when a department was hiring and we were deep in the active interviewing process only to get notice that all hiring was placed on hold by accounting. Then 2-3 months later when things were moving again we would pick up where we left off.



Sometimes we would also send the resume to another internal department and they would be interested in the person who had applied but the actual individual who originally applied would be getting a call from the same HR office assuming it was for the same position. You just never know but I will say if you are ever called back 3-6 months later or even a year later thatís a very good sign because it meant you made a good enough impression that they kept you in mind. Especially considering where I worked we processed hundreds of resumes a week.
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Old 12-14-2015, 08:30 PM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,718,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous Lurker View Post
A person can have an incredible resume with more qualifications and experience than any other applicant and have a great presentation and appearance but can blow the job interview with one simple question, such as starting out by asking "What is the compensation / pay?"

This is a huge turn off for HR personnel because it told us up front that this person was more concerned with what they would get out of the job than what they could give to the job. Often times asking the salary or benefits will simply cause the interview to shut down and you'll be labeled as a needy taker and not a company giver. Often times we found it very refreshing when during the entire interview process an applicant never asked us about the salary or benefits and all we discussed were past history and qualifications and other related issues. If we concluded the interview without the topic of pay ever coming up it was a given (if they met the qualifications we were looking for) that we always called them back for a second interview.
this is a ridiculous attitude that i really hope is becoming out of fashion.

guess what, people work for money. we live in a capitalist society and people need money to survive. certainly you want someone who cares about the job beyond money but it's absurd to make them pretend that money has no influence on their decision. i love my work in nonprofits and care about the causes i've worked for a lot but if my current job paid $10k i wouldn't be able to pay my rent and i would need to do something else.

i will never understand why applicants are expected to go through multiple interviews, spending their time and the hiring manager's time, when at the end it could turn out that the salary is not something the applicant can live on and everyone's time was just wasted. or we're expected to play our hands and say what we want, or what we have made previously, but the employer stays quiet about what they're willing to pay.

i'm driving 5 hours tomorrow to interview for 2 jobs when i don't know if the pay is something i will accept. and i'm doing it because that's the norm, but really i would much prefer knowing if these positions are worth my time and money (and the hiring managers' time) to interview for.

i don't get what the big taboo is about just posting the salary range in the job posting, and then no one's time is wasted if expectations and reality are too far apart.
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Old 12-15-2015, 07:31 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
1,357 posts, read 1,111,005 times
Reputation: 3438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous Lurker View Post
A person can have an incredible resume with more qualifications and experience than any other applicant and have a great presentation and appearance but can blow the job interview with one simple question, such as starting out by asking "What is the compensation / pay?"

This is a huge turn off for HR personnel because it told us up front that this person was more concerned with what they would get out of the job than what they could give to the job. Often times asking the salary or benefits will simply cause the interview to shut down and you'll be labeled as a needy taker and not a company giver. Often times we found it very refreshing when during the entire interview process an applicant never asked us about the salary or benefits and all we discussed were past history and qualifications and other related issues. If we concluded the interview without the topic of pay ever coming up it was a given (if they met the qualifications we were looking for) that we always called them back for a second interview.
EVERYONE is more concerned with what they are going to get out of the job - Be it pay, promotions, experience, whatever. The only reason they give a crap about the company or the job is because of what it gives to them.

This is the problem with HR and interviews - people are forced to be fake and dishonest. How many people do think come in and lie through their teeth about being late or about how enthusiastic they are? They do that because they know if they don't, they won't get hired.
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Old 12-15-2015, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Planet Telex
4,663 posts, read 2,294,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
this is a ridiculous attitude that i really hope is becoming out of fashion.

guess what, people work for money. we live in a capitalist society and people need money to survive. certainly you want someone who cares about the job beyond money but it's absurd to make them pretend that money has no influence on their decision. i love my work in nonprofits and care about the causes i've worked for a lot but if my current job paid $10k i wouldn't be able to pay my rent and i would need to do something else.
This is the reality today... we have socialism for the rich. Guy Sorman examined the inherent contradictions of capitalism as a system but came to the wrong conclusion. It's not the intellectuals fault, but a failure of the system itself.
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Old 12-17-2015, 01:40 PM
 
Location: NC to ATL
140 posts, read 137,426 times
Reputation: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous Lurker View Post
A person can have an incredible resume with more qualifications and experience than any other applicant and have a great presentation and appearance but can blow the job interview with one simple question, such as starting out by asking "What is the compensation / pay?"

This is a huge turn off for HR personnel because it told us up front that this person was more concerned with what they would get out of the job than what they could give to the job. Often times asking the salary or benefits will simply cause the interview to shut down and you'll be labeled as a needy taker and not a company giver. Often times we found it very refreshing when during the entire interview process an applicant never asked us about the salary or benefits and all we discussed were past history and qualifications and other related issues. If we concluded the interview without the topic of pay ever coming up it was a given (if they met the qualifications we were looking for) that we always called them back for a second interview.
Gotta agree with the previous responses, this is an unrealistic way of hiring. The whole point of showing up to work is paying bills.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous Lurker View Post

Something else that always stood out for me was individuals who submitted a head-shot of themselves on nice glossy photo stock with a bio on the back. This indicated they valued our company to give us (spend their money on such an expense when they probably didnít have it) something to set them apart from others. Looking at the images later gave us an idea of who it was again and always stood out as being an added professional courtesy.
Now that we are in an online world, should job applicants attach a photo of themselves to their job applications?


Also --- I've had 2 experiences now with recruiters/staffing agencies.... One agency, I got hired on a temporary contract that was supposed to be perm, but the company went through cut backs and ended up laying off a bunch of their permanent employees, thus they did not hire me. I did a follow up call with my recruiter who had another job (with a 90 min commute) which I did not take, but after that, my follow up emails and updated resume has gone unanswered. Why?

The second agency I just interviewed with, and they verbally told me that there was one temporary job open that needed to be filled by Friday, but today when I followed up, they said that company wasn't hiring for a few weeks and there are no available jobs. Why the inconsistency? Is it just the holidays or what? When does hiring start again?
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Old 12-19-2015, 03:46 PM
 
2,347 posts, read 1,455,082 times
Reputation: 3112
When I've heard that, it sounds like a polite brush-off. "We're not really interested in you right now, but if we get desperate, we know where to find you."

However, I have gotten two calls after not getting the job for which I initially interviewed (and being told they'd keep my application on file). One was a year later (and we were moving to another state, so I declined) and the other was about 6 months later (I was still looking and really wanted that job, so I took it).

I think it depends quite a bit on the applicant pool for that job. If they continuously get quite a few high quality applicants, then it's less likely they'd mine filed applications for a suitable match. If they have fewer applicants and they aren't the best, they're more likely to dig through other possibilities on file. Reapplying can be a good thing, to get your name back on the top again, but that only works if you are a good applicant/match to begin with. I've hired for plenty of positions where we've decided not to hire rather than hire someone we didn't think could do the job well or wasn't a good fit. Reapplying every few months won't make someone who looked back to begin with look any better. But for someone who was a close second or a third or fourth, there are very real possibilities that something might pan out.
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