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Old 12-13-2015, 05:38 PM
 
3 posts, read 1,261 times
Reputation: 10

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Hello,

Is it okay to negotiate salary when becoming a full time employee from a part time contractor? I thought the answer is a gigantic "yes!" However, I've been told otherwise by a few people. Their reasons are 1) I have less than a year's experience 2) it will sound like I just want the money and not contribute to the company, will pass me up and go to someone else if negotiating happens.


Some background info,
I've been working as a contractor for them for a few months. It's been going very well. I have been providing them with a larger skill set than initially asked and they know this. I would definitely like to have this full time position.

A week or two ago the co-founder/owner sat down with me asking if I can work on more days (which I said yes to, it's still less than 40 hours/week) During this talk she also mentioned the company is about to hire people as full time employees including me in a few weeks.


So...I just roll with it? All other variables are irrelevant? Such as my skill set, the cost of living, yada yada.

Thanks for advice and suggestions.
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Old 12-14-2015, 07:08 AM
 
1,500 posts, read 2,359,515 times
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Are you currently being paid market value for your title, education, and experience? That needs to ALWAYS be your first question when considering negotiating pay. It's your strongest bargaining chip.

If you've been a contractor almost a year, I think asking for a small bump is reasonable because it may be another year before you get an annual review/raise.

When I hire a contractor to full time, typically HR feels the paid vacation days and amazing benefits are a raise in and of themselves. However, they don't mind when I advocate giving my staff a modest raise of 3-5%, particularly if the person has been a contractor for about a year.
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Old 12-14-2015, 11:29 PM
 
3 posts, read 1,261 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowbelle View Post
Are you currently being paid market value for your title, education, and experience? That needs to ALWAYS be your first question when considering negotiating pay. It's your strongest bargaining chip.

If you've been a contractor almost a year, I think asking for a small bump is reasonable because it may be another year before you get an annual review/raise.
Currently, I am not being paid market value. I am paid lower than market value. The contract is for 3 months. Does this mean I take whatever is offered?
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