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Old 12-13-2015, 06:15 PM
 
299 posts, read 257,415 times
Reputation: 126

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Are those conducting a long-distance job search at a big disadvantage? I've noticed many employers will post "local candidates only" which makes me think that, yes they are.

Additionally, will most companies fly you out to interview? Will some companies hire you solely based on your resume/ a Skype interview? Is it extremely rare for companies to pay for relocation costs? I'm assuming yes if you work for nonprofits (like I do).

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Old 12-13-2015, 06:41 PM
 
1,040 posts, read 898,966 times
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It did seem to be a disadvantage.

I had about half of them willing to fly me out and pay relocation, since my skill set is unique. Half of them said they'd be willing to consider out of town candidates but would not pay any travel/relocation expenses.

I had phone and Skype as first interviews, but all wanted to meet in person for the final interview. I had one place try to schedule a 3-hour phone interview for the 2nd interview, with a plan for me to fly out after that.
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Old 12-13-2015, 07:08 PM
 
299 posts, read 257,415 times
Reputation: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagineAA View Post
It did seem to be a disadvantage.

I had about half of them willing to fly me out and pay relocation, since my skill set is unique. Half of them said they'd be willing to consider out of town candidates but would not pay any travel/relocation expenses.

I had phone and Skype as first interviews, but all wanted to meet in person for the final interview. I had one place try to schedule a 3-hour phone interview for the 2nd interview, with a plan for me to fly out after that.
Interesting... were you currently employed when conducting the job-search? I figure that might be difficult, trying to get time off and traveling for interviews, while being secretive about it.
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Old 12-14-2015, 06:35 AM
 
204 posts, read 209,878 times
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I start my new job in January... I didn't have a phone interview per se, it was more of the supervisor giving me information about the position. She basically told me that if I was willing to fly up and meet with them (on my own dime) that I would have the job because they were so impressed by my interview. A lot of people told me I was crazy for doing this since airfare isn't cheap... but I saw it as a risk I was willing to take. Luckily, I left the interview with a job. I'm a social worker and they don't normally wait for 8 weeks for someone to start, but I got extremely lucky.
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Old 12-14-2015, 10:47 AM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,759,653 times
Reputation: 4944
searching long distance is definitely a disadvantage, more so the more common your skill set is.

i've had a pretty good rate of response searching long distance twice (a couple of years ago about 500 miles, right now about 250). that's driving distance so it's a little different than if you have to fly, but a lot of the same things apply. i don't have super rare or specialized skills, my background is as an administrative assistant/office manager at small nonprofits where i also did a little of everything - development, it support, finance, project management, etc. here's what i do:

- above all, i make sure that my resume and cover letter are top notch. i customize every cover letter to the organization and job, and have a couple of different versions of my resume (one that focuses more on development, one more on IT, one more on database work, etc) that i tweak as necessary. i'm in nonprofits and i'm very good at articulating why i care about the issues different organizations work on in my cover letter so i think that puts me at a real advantage.

- i address the fact that i am moving, why, and how quickly i can relocate at the beginning of my cover letter (i'm in a position where i can move with 2 weeks notice, so that helps). the last time i did this i often said i could move without assistance. now that i'm a bit further along in my career i'm leaving that on the table, though. this helps to allay the main fear that employers have about long distance candidates - that they'll change their mind about moving, before or after they start the job, and/or that they won't be able to start quickly. they're also probably worried about paying for relocation so if you've got a skill set that they can easily find locally, or if you just don't need the help, you can say so as well. the reason i put this stuff at the beginning of my cover letter is that i used to put it at the end and hiring managers clearly weren't seeing it. it's important, so it's one of the first things i say. one thing i've seen suggested is putting "moving to [city x] on [date]" after your address on your resume. i haven't done that myself but it seems like a good idea in case your cover letter isn't read.

- i tried my hardest to do in person interviews and to be available to do them as quickly as a local candidate. this was easy at my last job, where my boss knew i was looking. at my current job i don't have that luxury, unfortunately, although i do at least have plenty of vacation and personal time. in my last search, and so far with this one, i had pretty good luck in terms of being able to schedule more than one interview per trip.

one thing i would NOT recommend is pretending to be local. i've seen that suggested as a way to get a foot in the door but to me it just seems like lying, and i think plenty of hiring managers would see it that way too. and if you're working, it's going to be pretty obvious to anyone reading your resume that you don't work in philly and live in LA, you know?

all of this stuff depends a lot on what you do. some professions it is totally normal to relocate and employers expect applicants from all over the place. some you really have to stand out against similarly qualified local candidates.

oh also, i should point out that i probably blew it not negotiating for relocation or even interview travel assistance from my current employer. they probably would have covered at least part of it, based on what i've seen with new hires since i started.
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Old 12-14-2015, 11:57 AM
 
299 posts, read 257,415 times
Reputation: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by fsu00 View Post
I start my new job in January... I didn't have a phone interview per se, it was more of the supervisor giving me information about the position. She basically told me that if I was willing to fly up and meet with them (on my own dime) that I would have the job because they were so impressed by my interview. A lot of people told me I was crazy for doing this since airfare isn't cheap... but I saw it as a risk I was willing to take. Luckily, I left the interview with a job. I'm a social worker and they don't normally wait for 8 weeks for someone to start, but I got extremely lucky.
I'm getting my MSW! So this is good to know
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Old 12-14-2015, 12:30 PM
 
299 posts, read 257,415 times
Reputation: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
searching long distance is definitely a disadvantage, more so the more common your skill set is.

i've had a pretty good rate of response searching long distance twice (a couple of years ago about 500 miles, right now about 250). that's driving distance so it's a little different than if you have to fly, but a lot of the same things apply. i don't have super rare or specialized skills, my background is as an administrative assistant/office manager at small nonprofits where i also did a little of everything - development, it support, finance, project management, etc. here's what i do:

- above all, i make sure that my resume and cover letter are top notch. i customize every cover letter to the organization and job, and have a couple of different versions of my resume (one that focuses more on development, one more on IT, one more on database work, etc) that i tweak as necessary. i'm in nonprofits and i'm very good at articulating why i care about the issues different organizations work on in my cover letter so i think that puts me at a real advantage.

- i address the fact that i am moving, why, and how quickly i can relocate at the beginning of my cover letter (i'm in a position where i can move with 2 weeks notice, so that helps). the last time i did this i often said i could move without assistance. now that i'm a bit further along in my career i'm leaving that on the table, though. this helps to allay the main fear that employers have about long distance candidates - that they'll change their mind about moving, before or after they start the job, and/or that they won't be able to start quickly. they're also probably worried about paying for relocation so if you've got a skill set that they can easily find locally, or if you just don't need the help, you can say so as well. the reason i put this stuff at the beginning of my cover letter is that i used to put it at the end and hiring managers clearly weren't seeing it. it's important, so it's one of the first things i say. one thing i've seen suggested is putting "moving to [city x] on [date]" after your address on your resume. i haven't done that myself but it seems like a good idea in case your cover letter isn't read.

- i tried my hardest to do in person interviews and to be available to do them as quickly as a local candidate. this was easy at my last job, where my boss knew i was looking. at my current job i don't have that luxury, unfortunately, although i do at least have plenty of vacation and personal time. in my last search, and so far with this one, i had pretty good luck in terms of being able to schedule more than one interview per trip.

one thing i would NOT recommend is pretending to be local. i've seen that suggested as a way to get a foot in the door but to me it just seems like lying, and i think plenty of hiring managers would see it that way too. and if you're working, it's going to be pretty obvious to anyone reading your resume that you don't work in philly and live in LA, you know?

all of this stuff depends a lot on what you do. some professions it is totally normal to relocate and employers expect applicants from all over the place. some you really have to stand out against similarly qualified local candidates.

oh also, i should point out that i probably blew it not negotiating for relocation or even interview travel assistance from my current employer. they probably would have covered at least part of it, based on what i've seen with new hires since i started.

This is such great advice! thanks I'm currently in Phoenix AZ for grad school and I am working here as well. While AZ is fine and dandy... I can't wait to move LOL and I just hope that my relocation isn't a HUGE issue. I hope that I can WOW whoever I apply with my Resume. I'm getting my MSW but in the nonprofit management concentration-- so I too am working as a manager in the office setting of a nonprofit--doing some policy/ admin/ event planning work. I know these skills aren't rare, but hopefully my personality, great resume, experience, and MSW might make up for that??
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Old 12-14-2015, 12:36 PM
 
299 posts, read 257,415 times
Reputation: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
searching long distance is definitely a disadvantage, more so the more common your skill set is.

i've had a pretty good rate of response searching long distance twice (a couple of years ago about 500 miles, right now about 250). that's driving distance so it's a little different than if you have to fly, but a lot of the same things apply. i don't have super rare or specialized skills, my background is as an administrative assistant/office manager at small nonprofits where i also did a little of everything - development, it support, finance, project management, etc. here's what i do:

- above all, i make sure that my resume and cover letter are top notch. i customize every cover letter to the organization and job, and have a couple of different versions of my resume (one that focuses more on development, one more on IT, one more on database work, etc) that i tweak as necessary. i'm in nonprofits and i'm very good at articulating why i care about the issues different organizations work on in my cover letter so i think that puts me at a real advantage.

- i address the fact that i am moving, why, and how quickly i can relocate at the beginning of my cover letter (i'm in a position where i can move with 2 weeks notice, so that helps). the last time i did this i often said i could move without assistance. now that i'm a bit further along in my career i'm leaving that on the table, though. this helps to allay the main fear that employers have about long distance candidates - that they'll change their mind about moving, before or after they start the job, and/or that they won't be able to start quickly. they're also probably worried about paying for relocation so if you've got a skill set that they can easily find locally, or if you just don't need the help, you can say so as well. the reason i put this stuff at the beginning of my cover letter is that i used to put it at the end and hiring managers clearly weren't seeing it. it's important, so it's one of the first things i say. one thing i've seen suggested is putting "moving to [city x] on [date]" after your address on your resume. i haven't done that myself but it seems like a good idea in case your cover letter isn't read.

- i tried my hardest to do in person interviews and to be available to do them as quickly as a local candidate. this was easy at my last job, where my boss knew i was looking. at my current job i don't have that luxury, unfortunately, although i do at least have plenty of vacation and personal time. in my last search, and so far with this one, i had pretty good luck in terms of being able to schedule more than one interview per trip.

one thing i would NOT recommend is pretending to be local. i've seen that suggested as a way to get a foot in the door but to me it just seems like lying, and i think plenty of hiring managers would see it that way too. and if you're working, it's going to be pretty obvious to anyone reading your resume that you don't work in philly and live in LA, you know?

all of this stuff depends a lot on what you do. some professions it is totally normal to relocate and employers expect applicants from all over the place. some you really have to stand out against similarly qualified local candidates.

oh also, i should point out that i probably blew it not negotiating for relocation or even interview travel assistance from my current employer. they probably would have covered at least part of it, based on what i've seen with new hires since i started.
I would love to speak with you/ message about your experiences in nonprofit management
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Old 12-14-2015, 12:59 PM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,759,653 times
Reputation: 4944
sure, feel free to send me a message!
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Old 12-14-2015, 01:38 PM
 
299 posts, read 257,415 times
Reputation: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
sure, feel free to send me a message!
Thanks I messaged you!
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