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Old 12-18-2015, 08:39 AM
 
659 posts, read 1,008,897 times
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because they're too cheap to buy something like Nitro to convert it themselves (for databasing)

because they want to see if you're dumb enough to steal a resume off the internet and not change the embedded author/company metadata
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Old 12-18-2015, 08:55 AM
 
2,286 posts, read 1,510,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
How do you mean? I have never hired someone because of the format of their resume. Nor have I rejected anyone. I've even seen resumes where the applicant added "flourish" in crayon or marker to try to stand out. Didn't help and the content of the resume showed why. My self and every hiring manager I've known reads resumes for content, not format.


That said, many HMs will be swayed by style and presentation when they meet in person for the interview.


Honestly I think you're worried over the wrong things. Any product you send that is not in one of the standard formats used in business offices (and HR is definitely on the non technical business side of the house) probably won't even make it to my desk for me to read. The clerk in HR just isn't going to try when the box pops up to "select program to open..." They're just going to trash it and move on.
Formatting, not format. This isn't for hiring managers. It's for HR people that narrow everything down by spending 3 seconds per resume before you ever see them. That's when you need to make your resume stand out.

For those of you unaware, LaTeX is a typesetting language that's typically used for mathematical papers, but also has uses for nice-looking resumes. You create a .tex file (which has a bunch of code, and almost looks like an HTML file in terms of readability). You have a program that converts this to a nice-looking .pdf file. The HR person never sees the .tex file, only the .pdf.
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Old 12-18-2015, 09:01 AM
 
659 posts, read 1,008,897 times
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Originally Posted by rarog View Post
Formatting, not format. This isn't for hiring managers. It's for HR people that narrow everything down by spending 3 seconds per resume before you ever see them. That's when you need to make your resume stand out.

For those of you unaware, LaTeX is a typesetting language that's typically used for mathematical papers, but also has uses for nice-looking resumes. You create a .tex file (which has a bunch of code, and almost looks like an HTML file in terms of readability). You have a program that converts this to a nice-looking .pdf file. The HR person never sees the .tex file, only the .pdf.

If you really want to go overkill on formatting (beyond what LaTeX offers),particularly on the untraditional creative side of things, you could create the whole thing in Illustrator/Inkscape/etc and ultimately convert to PDF as well
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Old 12-18-2015, 09:35 AM
 
6,842 posts, read 3,714,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rarog View Post
Formatting, not format. This isn't for hiring managers. It's for HR people that narrow everything down by spending 3 seconds per resume before you ever see them. That's when you need to make your resume stand out.
.
What several folks have tried to say, and somehow isn't being communicated, is HR isn't looking at that. They are sticking it into whatever keyword scanner they use and you want to make it as easy as possible for that to happen. For whatever reason, this particular HR wants it in Word. Why make it hard for them to pick you?


Regarding pdf, don't assume that everyone can use it. For example our secretary is the only one in the office who has the software to edit pdf (as opposed the reader software). Yet she absolutely panics if a pdf shows up at her desk or if she's asked to convert one.


And just for a total side bar, we recently had a 'round and 'round with our management over LaTeX for professional papers. Guess which product we have to do our papers in? You probably wouldn't like working here.
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
5,907 posts, read 7,020,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Regarding pdf, don't assume that everyone can use it. For example our secretary is the only one in the office who has the software to edit pdf (as opposed the reader software).
That's why I send stuff in PDF when I don't want it edited. But everybody has the reader.
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:09 AM
 
1,510 posts, read 964,546 times
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Originally Posted by tnff View Post
What several folks have tried to say, and somehow isn't being communicated, is HR isn't looking at that. They are sticking it into whatever keyword scanner they use and you want to make it as easy as possible for that to happen. For whatever reason, this particular HR wants it in Word. Why make it hard for them to pick you?
Sounds like that is the case. Their hoop, they have their reasons for choosing it. If you want to apply for their job, you need to jump through their hoop.

We get resumes passed to us through an online system that is far from perfect: lots of formatting, font style, font size inconsistencies and even obviously missing content. Certainly not what the person sees when they print it nor what they think will ultimately reach us. I have no idea if the problem lies with the submission or the system or a bit of both, but easily half of the resumes that make it to us have issues (and HR will not pass on the original printed submission).

Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Regarding pdf, don't assume that everyone can use it. For example our secretary is the only one in the office who has the software to edit pdf (as opposed the reader software). Yet she absolutely panics if a pdf shows up at her desk or if she's asked to convert one.
The .pdf has been a standard and commonly used format for perhaps 20 years. Panicking over receiving a .pdf to read? Does she similarly panic if she receives a letter printed on off-white paper instead of brilliant white paper?
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:34 AM
 
9,661 posts, read 4,553,619 times
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Originally Posted by Moby Hick View Post
But that's the bizarre thing. It was sent in PDF, not LaTeX. That is one of the standard formats used in every kind of office. There is literally nobody in the world with a computer who can't open a PDF. It's more common than Word.
All PDFs are not the same.
https://www.bluebeam.com/us/support/...-greg/2-14.asp

It may not be just a matter of opening them to view but scanning/searching for data or importing into a database.
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:36 AM
 
3,460 posts, read 2,198,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rarog View Post
I have a very nice-looking resume in .pdf format (just talking about aesthetics, not necessarily content), and I got a request to send it to them in MS Word instead (not the first time this has happened). I did my resume in LaTeX, and quite frankly don't want to copy/paste it into Word and deal with all the annoying inevitable formatting issues.

So why do they want this? Pdf files are much more professional, and contain less identifying information about you/your computer as far as I know. And it's just as easy to copy/paste from or search in a .pdf file as a .doc/x file.
So they can easily re-format it to exclude all those verbose things you put in there that you thought made you special. They remove stupid stuff like your photo your "Objective", your summer camp jobs, and use a generic font just listing what is important to them.

Well, which is it? Is PDF easy to copy/paste into a Word document or not? Or is it just easier for them to do it in HR because they have magic powers?

LaTeX? Give me a break. Put it in Word, join society. How long could it possibly take you, a Saturday afternoon? Send it to someone on Fiverr.com, and get it done for $5.00.

I don't know what you're concerned about with identifying information in a file format that's going to a prospective employer who will have far more important information about you obtained through background checks. HR doesn't care about what platform or what version the application was used to create the file.
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:41 AM
 
659 posts, read 1,008,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastcoastguyz View Post

Well, which is it? Is PDF easy to copy/paste into a Word document or not? Or is it just easier for them to do it in HR because they have magic powers?

If they have ~$90 it should take at most 5 seconds per resume.
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:42 AM
 
3,460 posts, read 2,198,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moby Hick View Post
I agree about the PDF. I wouldn't send a resume in Word even though I write my resume in Word. I've never had anybody who had a problem with the PDF.
You have likely not applied for positions in large companies or organizations. Even if they will look at a PDF, by the time they are actually interested in you seriously they will ask for a Word version of the document.
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