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Old 12-19-2015, 05:41 PM
 
6,835 posts, read 3,708,603 times
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This is a tough one, because of what Hemlock said. Yet if they're like ours, the title is absolutely meaningless and gives no indication of what we actually do. Which is another thing we can thank HR for -- they lumped dozens of different jobs into one title and description. Literally no one outside our organization would understand it. Heck even my boss doesn't know what I do. So I can easily understand trying to use the closest title that matches what you do. But you don't want to be so far off that Chief of Single Whites on the country road crew becomes Vice President in charge of Double Yellows.
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Old 12-19-2015, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
9,986 posts, read 16,652,835 times
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I suggest you put the 'official title' in parenthesis. For example one employer uses the title Human Resources Specialist.. that would cover compensation specialist, employee relations specialist, recruiting, etc. each with a specific skill set.
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Old 12-19-2015, 05:52 PM
 
5,334 posts, read 5,295,429 times
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A 3 person company?

Pfft...put whatever title you want as long as the person who answers the phone backs it.
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Old 12-19-2015, 09:50 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,690 posts, read 2,540,051 times
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Ideally, one would list the titles similarly to how organizations do, such as the following example:

Environmental Specialist II (Working Title: Sea Turtle HCP Field Manager)

Job Bulletin
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Old 12-19-2015, 10:14 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,529 posts, read 2,313,883 times
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cleaning supplies clerk => chemical engineer
janitor => president
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Old 12-19-2015, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
Reputation: 27573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
When HR or the background check people call to verify prior employment, the title had better match, or you would be considered to provide false information and be rejected. It's a fairly common trick to make your job sound more important than it is. Abbreviations would be OK, but not changing the words.
I agree, but it depends on how desperate the person is. If they are stuck with a "junior," "trainee," etc in the title, it might be beneficial to roll the dice and just go for it.
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Old 12-19-2015, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Southeast U.S
848 posts, read 640,792 times
Reputation: 964
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I agree, but it depends on how desperate the person is. If they are stuck with a "junior," "trainee," etc in the title, it might be beneficial to roll the dice and just go for it.
Yeah. A lot of job seekers are desperate for better paying/full time jobs. My classmates inflated their job titles from lab technician/chemical technician and put chemist on their resume instead when they applied to permanent chemist jobs.

Nearly all of them worked for temp/staffing agencies in which it's more difficult for background check companies to prove what the job title actually is when they call the staffing agency because most are only allowed to say the time they worked From to the time they stopped working.

In my profession, inflating your job title isn't going to give you any advantage anyway because it's the skills you acquired from the position and how technical the work you were doing that matters more than the job title.

In cases like if someone puts down administrative Assistant rather than "secretary" or account exuctive instead of "sales person" those title names are virtually the same thing.

I say put your exact title and then put your working title in parentheses as one poster suggested.
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Old 12-19-2015, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Bran's tree
11,045 posts, read 4,855,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I agree, but it depends on how desperate the person is. If they are stuck with a "junior," "trainee," etc in the title, it might be beneficial to roll the dice and just go for it.
That's what I'm wondering myself. Particularly if those with the "junior" in front of their title do the exact same thing as those with just the regular title. Same title, but just leaving off the "Jr" in front of it.
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Old 12-20-2015, 12:10 AM
 
299 posts, read 252,974 times
Reputation: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-fused View Post
A 3 person company?

Pfft...put whatever title you want as long as the person who answers the phone backs it.
lol... good point
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Old 12-20-2015, 12:15 AM
 
299 posts, read 252,974 times
Reputation: 126
yeah... it's just confusing. My job-title is very administrative, but I do less admin work and more marketing/ event planning/ even write some policy. Its a small nonprofit, like I said, so we all help run it. I just REALLY dislike the title. I'm not going to change it from admin assistant- CEO but changing the title on my resume to better fit what I ACTUALLY do? It seems like a good idea to me, since it's so hard to get hired, but also-- I DONT want to risk losing an offer over it. I work in nonprofits, so I don't know how intense the background checks are-- it depends who you are working for. I guess the HUGE mixed messages I've been getting are troubling. When I google it 50% say its a fine and it's a good way to get hired, others say it's a death sentence and that it's considered lying. I guess it depends on each situation... I just wish there was a general rule-of-thumb. I get you shouldn't ever lie-- but how important is a title anyways? And it's the first thing a manager will see- so shouldn't the title be eye-catching?

Last edited by Quizillla; 12-20-2015 at 12:24 AM..
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