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Old 12-28-2015, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Western Pa
435 posts, read 436,821 times
Reputation: 279

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A company a applied for emailed me and asked for a resume and salary requirements. I hate to underpay myself nor over pay and honestly not knowing EXACTLY what the job entails -- How can I answer that question.


Any suggestions
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Old 12-28-2015, 01:48 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
1,357 posts, read 1,118,150 times
Reputation: 3438
I never really know how to answer this question either. I don't want to lowball myself, but I don't want to knock myself out of the running either as the rest of the benefits might make up for a somewhat lower pay rate.
Most say to use the "negotiable based on the entire benefits package." Sometimes I wonder if the employers look at that and say "they didn't follow instructions" and toss it in the trash and move on.
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Old 12-28-2015, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Western Pa
435 posts, read 436,821 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melodica View Post
I never really know how to answer this question either. I don't want to low ball myself, but I don't want to knock myself out of the running either as the rest of the benefits might make up for a somewhat lower pay rate.
Most say to use the "negotiable based on the entire benefits package." Sometimes I wonder if the employers look at that and say "they didn't follow instructions" and toss it in the trash and move on.

Exactly how I feel...If I give a generic safe answer that might translate as this candidate doesn't take action and that is what we need at this position. Yes, I am sure over thinking this situation however I just never had to give this at such a early stage.
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Old 12-28-2015, 06:53 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
1,357 posts, read 1,118,150 times
Reputation: 3438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augie6 View Post
Exactly how I feel...If I give a generic safe answer that might translate as this candidate doesn't take action and that is what we need at this position. Yes, I am sure over thinking this situation however I just never had to give this at such a early stage.
I agree. It doesn't feel right giving that out before you even get to talk with someone about the job.

I think a lot of employers are using that to weed people out. Either the ones who don't pay attention and don't include it, refuse to include it or include a number that's more than they want to pay. Unless it's something I'm REALLY interested in, I generally skip the ones that ask for that.
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Old 12-28-2015, 07:52 PM
 
789 posts, read 1,684,811 times
Reputation: 1059
I think the answer here depends a lot on where this job falls salary-wise. While I understand that someone making $10 an hour might have a hard time figuring out their salary requirements for a higher-up position, I don't see how someone making $50k annually doesn't know their salary requirements. First, it's always best to give a range. The low end being the absolute minimum you would accept for the position, assuming great benefits and no other issues. The size of the range would depend on the size of the salary. Then you have to consider that your current salary will figure into the equation of what they're willing to pay you. While there are lots of exceptions to this, typically you're not going to see a spike of 50% or higher from current salary. But again, this is wholly dependent on your particular skills and situation. Generally I'd say if you're making $50k now, you'd want your range to look something like $55k-65k or $60k-70k.

Now you could always say "salary negotiable", but you chance them passing on you for this. I would never want to interview someone without knowing first that I can afford them. While I would normally have HR call to get the salary range, if enough qualified candidates apply for a position, they might not bother doing this.

Finally, I do want to throw out there that not all companies are trying to get people as cheaply as possible. In almost every large organization positions are graded. So they're always going to hire someone within that salary grade. If they identify you as being currently underpaid and think they can get you for less than the low end of the grade, they're not going to do it. Because if they do, HR will lower the grade for the position. And it is such a nightmare getting a grade raised. Any sane manager is going to bring someone in right around the salary they were originally expecting when they posted the position. Regardless of whether this is higher than your salary range.
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Old 12-29-2015, 06:55 PM
 
2,183 posts, read 1,736,774 times
Reputation: 1834
Quote:
Originally Posted by MainLineMommy View Post
I think the answer here depends a lot on where this job falls salary-wise. While I understand that someone making $10 an hour might have a hard time figuring out their salary requirements for a higher-up position, I don't see how someone making $50k annually doesn't know their salary requirements. First, it's always best to give a range. The low end being the absolute minimum you would accept for the position, assuming great benefits and no other issues. The size of the range would depend on the size of the salary. Then you have to consider that your current salary will figure into the equation of what they're willing to pay you. While there are lots of exceptions to this, typically you're not going to see a spike of 50% or higher from current salary. But again, this is wholly dependent on your particular skills and situation. Generally I'd say if you're making $50k now, you'd want your range to look something like $55k-65k or $60k-70k.

Now you could always say "salary negotiable", but you chance them passing on you for this. I would never want to interview someone without knowing first that I can afford them. While I would normally have HR call to get the salary range, if enough qualified candidates apply for a position, they might not bother doing this.

Finally, I do want to throw out there that not all companies are trying to get people as cheaply as possible. In almost every large organization positions are graded. So they're always going to hire someone within that salary grade. If they identify you as being currently underpaid and think they can get you for less than the low end of the grade, they're not going to do it. Because if they do, HR will lower the grade for the position. And it is such a nightmare getting a grade raised. Any sane manager is going to bring someone in right around the salary they were originally expecting when they posted the position. Regardless of whether this is higher than your salary range.
Here is a novel idea to all hr/hm who pull this crap just state what your company is willing to pay for a given position. There is no excuse for doing otherwise. It is completely dishonest to have applicants send salary requirements just to disqualify most of them for doing so.
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Old 12-30-2015, 08:22 AM
 
454 posts, read 402,068 times
Reputation: 378
I would just put the target you want to hit. When I have recruiters call me, the first thing I ask them is what is the range so im not wasting anyones time.
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Old 12-30-2015, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Dallas TX
15,050 posts, read 21,810,854 times
Reputation: 22320
Do some research of what the position should pay. Glassdoor has some salaries posted that can give you guidance.
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Old 12-30-2015, 01:38 PM
 
Location: nYC
684 posts, read 504,125 times
Reputation: 334
Find out what GalssDoor or salary.com pays for this job, location, company. give em that RANAGE min what you will accept to max what the job could pay.
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Old 12-30-2015, 03:26 PM
 
1,378 posts, read 1,120,196 times
Reputation: 2199
Do your research so you at least know the market rate. But, I always give a range that includes most my recent salary and the market salary for the new role. So, if I made 30K at my last job, my expectation is now $35-50K. Notice how I gave myself a 5K raise ;-)
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