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Old 01-24-2016, 08:01 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,495,293 times
Reputation: 4920

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The woman in the story that was unemployed for 9 years is blaming it on age, when it's more about the work gap and not staying in contact the people she met over her 20-30 yr work history. I can't find her on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is a great place to see where all your contacts are.

Even if she was a 30 yr old man, she still be having a hard time finding a job and settling for a teaching position or whatever. He is not going to get any hits based on job experience from 10 years ago. If that male was in IT, it's even worse. Technology has moved on. His skills may be obsolete.

On the other hand, one of my favorite people retired in her late 50s. She did not work for a year, so that she could travel.

She maintained a LinkedIn profile with numerous former co-workers, clients, and vendors. She landed a high level senior management position at a new company, building out their senior staff.
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Old 01-25-2016, 07:05 AM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,998,554 times
Reputation: 1842
Even if you network, you likely still have to apply for a job formally, and many if not most full-time jobs require online applications, which have all the hoops to jump through, etc.

I would advise every woman over a certain age to begin assuming that she is going to lose her job (or have to leave, to take care of relatives) and lay in resources before it happens. I did this, and I'm very glad I did. I'm looking for work, but I'm not desperate because I was able to save a good deal of money for an extended job search. (And needless to say, I'm now on a strict budget!) It continually astonishes me to read stories about 50something women who've been laid off, and are up to their eyeballs in debt because of home mortgages, vacations, and expensive master's degrees. (Sometimes it's health problems that cause the debt, in which case I would give them more of a pass...)

Don't fall for the trap. If you are single or divorced you cannot expect to live large. Leave the McMansion purchases for others...

If you are a 35-year-old single or divorced woman (or even don't trust your husband all that much), you should start thinking now about paying down your debts, not racking up new ones, and having ample savings by the time you are 45. When you are 45 it's the danger zone. Sharpen your resume long before you have to. I wish I had done even more than I did.
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Old 01-25-2016, 08:08 AM
 
298 posts, read 205,960 times
Reputation: 778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeromeville View Post
Even if you network, you likely still have to apply for a job formally, and many if not most full-time jobs require online applications, which have all the hoops to jump through, etc.

I would advise every woman over a certain age to begin assuming that she is going to lose her job (or have to leave, to take care of relatives) and lay in resources before it happens. I did this, and I'm very glad I did. I'm looking for work, but I'm not desperate because I was able to save a good deal of money for an extended job search. (And needless to say, I'm now on a strict budget!) It continually astonishes me to read stories about 50something women who've been laid off, and are up to their eyeballs in debt because of home mortgages, vacations, and expensive master's degrees. (Sometimes it's health problems that cause the debt, in which case I would give them more of a pass...)

Don't fall for the trap. If you are single or divorced you cannot expect to live large. Leave the McMansion purchases for others...

If you are a 35-year-old single or divorced woman (or even don't trust your husband all that much), you should start thinking now about paying down your debts, not racking up new ones, and having ample savings by the time you are 45. When you are 45 it's the danger zone. Sharpen your resume long before you have to. I wish I had done even more than I did.
I agree. Many over 40s women are not prepared in life in general. They think their husbands, boyfriends or children are going to be around to take care of them once they hit their 50s. So they don't realize maybe the husband could die first, find someone else and ask for a divorce or the kids could leave and have their own lives? Why is this not realistic? They think their bosses are going to keep them there for the next 20 yrs? Yea right.That's seriously naive. Anybody who is reasonably informed knows the profound ageism in this country especially when it comes to women. I love the ones who return to school later in life, for a profession that clearly only favors young people; if only these people would inform themselves. They live under a rock I swear. - cry me a river. you made your bed now sleep in it.
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Old 01-25-2016, 08:14 AM
 
298 posts, read 205,960 times
Reputation: 778
What the reader of these sob stories about age discrimination may not realize is: these people may have other issues/problems that prevent them from being hired - or kept from being layed off. Like someone said before, technology. Attitude; many of them are bitter and this carries over to the interview and workplace. Some of them might look obese, badly groomed or communicate really badly. Others don't get a long with younger people. If I am the employer I wouldn't want to deal with someone who has these problems. When I was unemployed a few years ago, I saw tons of them at the office. It became clear many times why they were unhireable. Until they realize what their issue is and fix it, they're going to be like that women in that article, and all the others you read about. We're not interviewing them or talking to them face to face. We have no way of knowing why nobody wants them.
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:02 AM
 
Location: midtown mile area, Atlanta GA
1,228 posts, read 2,052,090 times
Reputation: 1774
LinkedIn is pretty much a farce. I have been on there for several years and I have yet to get anything from it. It seems like it's only there for sales people and people who have services and books to sell.

I go into every interview upbeat, positive, well groomed, etc. and still get turned down. I am working three part time jobs and I still have to use savings despite downsizing and watching my money carefully.

I am considering ending it all when my money runs out. When you are not wanted, you are not wanted even at 47.
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:10 AM
 
298 posts, read 205,960 times
Reputation: 778
But you have 3 jobs, that's hope right there. It's not all hopeless like some people want you to believe.

LinkedIn is too hyped up. It helps some people in certain professions.That's it. Some of you must figure out what's going on.Maybe it's the area you live in. Maybe it's the occupations you choose. Some of them have more ageism than others.Some companies, you can just see from their website or news articles on them that they're having a love affair with millennials. Why oh why would you interview with them? Each person rejected has to figure it out for themselves. You're living in America, not some third world country where it really is literally hopeless for women over 40. Of course there's discrimination. Sometimes I've walked into a room and the atmosphere became arctic when they looked at me. But you go on and persevere. America.
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Old 01-25-2016, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Upper Darby, PA
403 posts, read 319,976 times
Reputation: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeromeville View Post
Even if you network, you likely still have to apply for a job formally, and many if not most full-time jobs require online applications, which have all the hoops to jump through, etc.

I would advise every woman over a certain age to begin assuming that she is going to lose her job (or have to leave, to take care of relatives) and lay in resources before it happens. I did this, and I'm very glad I did. I'm looking for work, but I'm not desperate because I was able to save a good deal of money for an extended job search. (And needless to say, I'm now on a strict budget!) It continually astonishes me to read stories about 50something women who've been laid off, and are up to their eyeballs in debt because of home mortgages, vacations, and expensive master's degrees. (Sometimes it's health problems that cause the debt, in which case I would give them more of a pass...)

Don't fall for the trap. If you are single or divorced you cannot expect to live large. Leave the McMansion purchases for others...

If you are a 35-year-old single or divorced woman (or even don't trust your husband all that much), you should start thinking now about paying down your debts, not racking up new ones, and having ample savings by the time you are 45. When you are 45 it's the danger zone. Sharpen your resume long before you have to. I wish I had done even more than I did.
If your network is strong enough you will fill out the application after you start the job.
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Old 01-26-2016, 09:25 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,495,293 times
Reputation: 4920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeromeville View Post
Even if you network, you likely still have to apply for a job formally, and many if not most full-time jobs require online applications, which have all the hoops to jump through, etc.

I would advise every woman over a certain age to begin assuming that she is going to lose her job (or have to leave, to take care of relatives) and lay in resources before it happens. I did this, and I'm very glad I did. I'm looking for work, but I'm not desperate because I was able to save a good deal of money for an extended job search. (And needless to say, I'm now on a strict budget!) It continually astonishes me to read stories about 50something women who've been laid off, and are up to their eyeballs in debt because of home mortgages, vacations, and expensive master's degrees. (Sometimes it's health problems that cause the debt, in which case I would give them more of a pass...)

Don't fall for the trap. If you are single or divorced you cannot expect to live large. Leave the McMansion purchases for others...

If you are a 35-year-old single or divorced woman (or even don't trust your husband all that much), you should start thinking now about paying down your debts, not racking up new ones, and having ample savings by the time you are 45. When you are 45 it's the danger zone. Sharpen your resume long before you have to. I wish I had done even more than I did.
Networks cut through much of the red tape. You don't fill out the online app until they after they contact you.

My boss and his superior are always asking me for referrals. I sent one referral, and HR called them the same day. My friend texted me back.

They didn't get the job, because my friend changed her mind. She was too happy at their current work place. She had worked at the same place for almost a decade and everybody was like a family to her. She was hugely underpaid by $20k at her current place, and that's why she wanted to leave. She opted to stay for less pay to stay with familiarity.

I also got a job interview with the SVP at a Fortune 500 company, when his VP gave my name as a referral. The VP was a former co-worker that connected to me on LinkedIn. They set me up with an appointment first to talk directly to the SVP. I didn't have to go through the typical HR screening or website. HR asked me to fill out the online application before the end of the day for tracking purposes.

I turned it down, because I accepted another job. At the other job, it was a group interview. The first thing they asked was "Did you used to work with so-so? He works for us now". The interview was pretty easy, after that. They had already checked up on me with my former co-worker(LinkedIn connection), before I even walked in the door. I did formally apply for this job through Taleo, though.

I do not work in sales, marketing or communications. I work in SQL reporting. Go figure. I have all my former bosses ready to hire me again. At 39, I have former co-workers have gone to management roles at other companies. I have developed stronger connections.

My network is stronger now than at 20 years of age. I have LinkedIn connections from 20's-60's. I contact the younger ones with positions that are a step above their current roles to help my employers. I may have less contact with my senior connections, but I do occasionally notify them of recent job postings that my current company. I only do it, if it's a promotion or I know they are looking to leave.

To utilize your network, you need to cultivate and maintain it like a garden. Don't expect much of a response, if you never contact them after the initial connection.

Last edited by move4ward; 01-26-2016 at 10:15 PM..
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Old 01-28-2016, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,757,007 times
Reputation: 35465
Networks are great if you can establish them. Not everyone is fortunate enough to be able to. Someone may have moved to a new town and knows no one or maybe is beginning a new career and is new to that field and does not know anyone in it to give them a leg up. There could be other reasons as well.

Having said that, I wouldn't have been able to get my last job at age 55 had I not be able to network at a company where I had been turned down twice by the HR department when I applied for openings about a year apart. I came in enthusiastic, very presentable, with excellent references and work skills, and anything an employer could want but all the interviewer could see was my age.

Then a friend who worked at the place cut the red tape and introduced me to a supervisor who happened to be my age. She told HR she wanted me and I got the job. It was one of the best I ever had.

Were it not for the friend, who was in the same field, I would never have gotten that job. I know I was very lucky.

Now I have to say this about those here who say that older people have bad attitudes when interviewing. As time went by ironically it became part of my task to interview people for entry level jobs for my department. Let me tell you it was the older hopefuls that had the best, most polite and most professional attitudes. Many of the youngsters were reticent, ill-spoken and distracted almost to the point of being rude. Not all of course but in all the many interviewees I saw, and there were many, never did I come across older applicants with "attitude."
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Old 01-28-2016, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Planet Telex
4,721 posts, read 2,323,060 times
Reputation: 4424
Quote:
Originally Posted by midtown mile girl View Post
LinkedIn is pretty much a farce. I have been on there for several years and I have yet to get anything from it. It seems like it's only there for sales people and people who have services and books to sell.
I don't even bother with LinkedIn, and the employers who really care about stuff like that would probably assume that I'm some kind of loser since I never use mine.
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