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Old 01-02-2016, 11:20 PM
 
289 posts, read 345,300 times
Reputation: 326

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I started a new job recently, and as much as I like the work, things aren't going so well. For one, myself and my coworkers have many personal issue with the way our boss poorly manages. I'm trying to keep it vague for anonymity's sake, but it ranges from small stuff like sending dozens of emails about innocuous little messes around the office and scrutinizing the way we do everything, to more worrisome things like trying to con us out of compensation for work (we are hourly and he argues about our time sheets all the time), to big red flags like swearing at employees and throwing things.

The policies our boss has enacted recently have also made it more difficult for all of us to achieve a decent work-life balance. He works people to the bone trying to make as much money for the company as he can, but that means we get stuck working 12 hour days, working holidays, and working during times of the week when we are normally off and have to cancel personal plans. It upsets me because I was told certain employment policies before I started there that have now all changed, or better yet he is now trying to tell me that he never told me those things (that's a lie). Without getting into specifics, he has taken away our compensation for certain client work even though the company still gets paid for it.

Aside from my personal hang-ups about my boss and the way he runs things, there is an even bigger problem: I feel like the company isn't doing so well financially and my job may not have a lot of security. Several other employees have told me about the company's money troubles in the past year (the place almost shut down even). My boss' obsession with trying to nickel and dime us at every turn makes me concerned that it's because we don't have enough money to run the place. Also, the projects I was told I would get have thus far not materialized.

So here's my conundrum- I just left a job I had only been at for a few months to take this job because the old job was grossly hazardous to my safety. If I leave my current job after only a few months as well I am worried I will look like a job hopper. I could try and find a new full-time job, but I will have to explain to potential employers why I'm leaving two jobs after only a few months. I do have the option of keeping on at this new job part-time and finding another part-time job somewhere else to supplement my income, which will look better than leaving right away, but then I will likely be without any company-sponsored benefits. What do you guys think is the best course?
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Old 01-03-2016, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,513,066 times
Reputation: 9889
Yes.
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Old 01-03-2016, 07:24 PM
 
789 posts, read 1,682,190 times
Reputation: 1059
As long as you don't start showing signs of perpetual job hopping, you should be fine leaving this job for a new full time job. Start job hunting. When asked why you are looking, you can either say the position is not a good fit or elude to the financial troubles at the company. Reassure the hiring manager that you are a long-term employee but that your current position does not appear to have long-term potential. You should be fine.
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Old 01-04-2016, 01:35 PM
 
289 posts, read 345,300 times
Reputation: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by MainLineMommy View Post
As long as you don't start showing signs of perpetual job hopping, you should be fine leaving this job for a new full time job. Start job hunting. When asked why you are looking, you can either say the position is not a good fit or elude to the financial troubles at the company. Reassure the hiring manager that you are a long-term employee but that your current position does not appear to have long-term potential. You should be fine.
Another catch: I don't know how soon I should leave. We do client-based work, and when I leave the company may lose all of my clients because no one else is able to take them. I don't really care about that except for the fact that I'm trying to leave on good terms with this employer.

Scenario one is I could leave sooner than later. I could probably quickly get a job doing some sort of unskilled work, like going back to the retailer I used to work for. That way, since I don't have many clients right now, the company wouldn't be losing as much and I would still be leaving during what is technically my probation period. The downside of taking a quick "transitional job" is I would be looking for more permanent work in my field shortly thereafter and would thus be leaving yet another job after a few months.

Scenario two is I could stay at my current job until I find something permanent in my field. However, by the time this happens I may have taken on more clients, and so once I leave, my company will be losing even more business. I'm concerned my boss will say "Well if you weren't happy here then why did you take on so many clients?" and he will give an unfavorable reference to potential future employers for that reason.

What is the best thing to do for myself in this case?
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Old 01-04-2016, 05:14 PM
 
Location: CasaMo
15,488 posts, read 7,513,612 times
Reputation: 16855
Quote:
Originally Posted by MainLineMommy View Post
As long as you don't start showing signs of perpetual job hopping, you should be fine leaving this job for a new full time job. Start job hunting. When asked why you are looking, you can either say the position is not a good fit or elude to the financial troubles at the company. Reassure the hiring manager that you are a long-term employee but that your current position does not appear to have long-term potential. You should be fine.
This. Life's too short to stay somewhere you don't like when there are other opportunities.

I've seen people leave jobs after a short time that weren't a good fit and there were no negative repercussions.
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