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Old 01-17-2016, 05:44 PM
 
41 posts, read 31,124 times
Reputation: 45

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Quote:
Originally Posted by seain dublin View Post
Apples and oranges. I did the same thing. I gave my two weeks notice and asked to start in three weeks so I had a week off in between jobs.

Someone who has been unemployed for months doesn't need a week delay, they have had months of time off already.



Why would that matter to you? You said your husband does very well and you really don't need to work.

You wouldn't need insurance benefits either. In fact your husband's plan is probably better than most you would find anyway.

Something doesn't make sense.

Sounds more like you do need a certain amount of income as well as benefits, nothing wrong with that.
But if you really didn't need that, you wouldn't care so much.
Ok
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Old 01-17-2016, 05:45 PM
 
41 posts, read 31,124 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarrel16567 View Post
Yes the unemployed person has been off but that period was trying to find work. So I see nothing wrong with having some time to yourself before starting a new job.
Some people have posted the same thing 5 times here. I'm not answering the same questions over and over again. Time to ignore those.
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Old 01-17-2016, 06:33 PM
 
18,876 posts, read 7,339,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janie233 View Post
Some people have posted the same thing 5 times here. .
Yes YOU have.
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Old 01-17-2016, 06:41 PM
 
41 posts, read 31,124 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobNJ1960 View Post
Yes YOU have.
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Old 01-18-2016, 08:40 AM
 
9,662 posts, read 4,556,288 times
Reputation: 12555
There's a lot of people here that appear to be trying harder to convince themselves than others.

All this talk about whether the guy was dishonest or not, generating an entire character profile based on one small event. I don't think this guy, in this small company with almost no turnover, really has much experience at all in hiring. I doubt he did anything intentional or even realized he was making a blood vow in the eyes of others. He was just caught unprepared by the question and stalled by giving the answer that keeps all options open. He could have handled it better for sure but I think this was more about his inexperience than lack of integrity.

All this talk about dodging a bullet and that this would have been a bad place to work, well I can't think of any better indicator of employee satisfaction than employee retention, and in this regard the company seems to be doing way better than most.

Now I do think the OP has the right to want to be compensated fairly regardless of what hubby makes or whether she needs it. It's about feeling valued and treated fairly. Look at how athletes will get in a snit over $16.1 million per year versus $15.9 million per year. It's not like they can't buy anything they want when they walk in a store. It's about getting compensated appropriately for your talent relative to what others are getting compensated.
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Old 01-18-2016, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Starting a walkabout
1,940 posts, read 938,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post

All this talk about dodging a bullet and that this would have been a bad place to work, well I can't think of any better indicator of employee satisfaction than employee retention, and in this regard the company seems to be doing way better than most.
This is what I had too emphasized in an earlier post.If seven employees can be there for 7-10+ years then there is something right going on with the company. People will not work for too long if there is poor pay, no paid time off or vacation. He probably gave enough bonuses to make the salary + bonus worthwhile to work there. New hires typically get less vacation and as you work longer you get more time off and sick leave.
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Old 01-18-2016, 10:26 AM
 
9,662 posts, read 4,556,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kamban View Post
This is what I had too emphasized in an earlier post.If seven employees can be there for 7-10+ years then there is something right going on with the company. People will not work for too long if there is poor pay, no paid time off or vacation. He probably gave enough bonuses to make the salary + bonus worthwhile to work there. New hires typically get less vacation and as you work longer you get more time off and sick leave.
I also don't believe that they give no raises. Maybe no standard scheduled raises, i.e. automatic raise after first six months, or raises for everyone at annual review. But probably merit raises and periodic wage adjustments. There's no way that other woman was making the same rate that she was hired at 16 years ago.
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Old 01-18-2016, 11:38 AM
 
8,976 posts, read 8,104,989 times
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Quote:
I also don't believe that they give no raises. Maybe no standard scheduled raises, i.e. automatic raise after first six months, or raises for everyone at annual review. But probably merit raises and periodic wage adjustments. There's no way that other woman was making the same rate that she was hired at 16 years ago.
What so many of you are not paying attention to, is the man pays a bonus twice a year, and that you can bet is based on the volume of business they do, and the profit they make.

This is very usual in business. I have gotten bonuses that were 1/4th of a year income.

In the sales world they call the basic low salary a draw, and that is just to give you some money. What you earn in commission, and or bonus is where you make your real money. I worked from August 54 when I got out of the Navy till I finally retired, and never worked for a salary. A draw against commission and/or bonus as a percentage of the business income was where the money was. Never in all those years, did I not far exceed the draw we got on the 15th, and the rest at the end of the month. Bonuses often were in addition to the commission for exceeding goals.

Draws did not have raises, and stayed the same. The salary this man pays, is the draw in the business world, and the bonus was is where they really make money.

Personally I would never work for wages, as they are too limiting on the money you can earn. I remember in 1958, I compared my W2 with the W2 of the Vice President in charge of labor (an attorney) for one of the largest railroads. I beat him by $14. In addition I drew in today's dollars spiffs, which were special payments for selling certain items, for another $25,000 plus in today's dollars over the year paid by manufacturers. He did about the same in private law practice.

Back in my furniture sales days, I made a few very big sales which would be over $200,000 to a customer today. I would make more on that one sale, than the clerks working in that big prestige department store earned in a year even after they got a few raises for longevity.

The bonuses they receive are enough to keep his employees as long as 16 years. If their total income was as low as the OP says the salary is, with no raises or benefits none of his staff would never have remained as they do.

There are much better ways to get paid, than just a salary.

When in the real estate business, the day I closed my office and retired, I got a call from a broker that worked for one investment group in their office. They had to foreclose on a big half built condo development. They wanted out of this. I asked what they would take, and they loved irrigated farms. I called a broker friend of mine that had just taken a 2.,000 acre irrigated farm in a big exchange. He and his brother (partner) wanted out of it. I asked him about the condo units in exchange, and they jumped on it. I drove to their office, got a contract for the exchange. Drove 70 miles to get the other signature. The two offices would handle it from there A little over $5,500,000 total. I did it for 3%. Figure my income yourself, and you will find that was a pretty good paycheck for 5 hours total work.

Quit thinking just the fixed small salary. Think how much the income could be with the bonuses included.
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Old 01-18-2016, 12:00 PM
 
9,662 posts, read 4,556,288 times
Reputation: 12555
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
Quit thinking just the fixed small salary. Think how much the income could be with the bonuses included.
It doesn't sound like he gave even the faintest indication of the amount of the bonus so there is no way to even consider it.

In the sales world, the majority of one's income is the commissions and bonusus but those are defined. You don't just go out and sell a bunch of stuff and if the boss feels like it he gives you some arbitrary amount of extra money.
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Old 01-18-2016, 12:00 PM
 
289 posts, read 344,485 times
Reputation: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe from dayton View Post
From his perspective, what is there to think about? You are unemployed, he told you the conditions of employment, and you said you were interested in the job based on the information provided. He offers you the job, but now you need to think about it, so he moves on to someone who doesn't need to think about it. I'm not saying I agree with it -- 24 hrs isn't going to have any impact on anything -- but that is probably what he was thinking.
When I am asked during interviews if "this is something I'd be interested in," my response is never concrete yes or no. I always say, "Based on this information, I would definitely consider the position." That's my way of saying, "I like what I'm hearing, but I would need to consider all the factors before jumping into this."

Also, it's common courtesy for employers to allow a reasonable amount of time (such as 24 hours) for you to mull over their official offer. If they can't even afford you that, that's a red flag to me. I'd be asking myself why not. Is the boss impatient? Does he not know anything about the standard hiring process? The fact that he gave the job to the first person to accept tells me it's at least the latter, and maybe some of the former to boot.
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