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Old 01-24-2016, 05:05 PM
 
563 posts, read 383,967 times
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No. It is a waste of time, as they former employer cannot tell you anything about the perspective employee. They may only confirm the dates that the employee worked. The interview is where the rubber meets the road. Getting a job is first about the resume and job history. This is an extremely important part of getting a job. Make it your best you can. This document will decide if you get called for an interview. Step 2: The interview. The interviewer is noticing more about you than you may realize. How are you dressed? Conservative dress is best, you are not going to the club. Do you have a lot of jewelry on? No one is impressed with your bling. Forget the cologne, too. A watch is a good sign, it means that you are time conscious. No,the one on you cell phone does not count. Leave your phone in the car or kept off in you pocket or purse. You should have a good knowledge of the company. History, culture, etc. Visit if at all possible. Get a feel. See who works there.

There are too many tells to fool a good interviewer. Did I get a little off topic? Oh well, now you know some tips on how to get a job. Good luck!
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Old 01-24-2016, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Upper Darby, PA
403 posts, read 315,147 times
Reputation: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollywood55 View Post
No. It is a waste of time, as they former employer cannot tell you anything about the perspective employee. They may only confirm the dates that the employee worked. The interview is where the rubber meets the road. Getting a job is first about the resume and job history. This is an extremely important part of getting a job. Make it your best you can. This document will decide if you get called for an interview. Step 2: The interview. The interviewer is noticing more about you than you may realize. How are you dressed? Conservative dress is best, you are not going to the club. Do you have a lot of jewelry on? No one is impressed with your bling. Forget the cologne, too. A watch is a good sign, it means that you are time conscious. No,the one on you cell phone does not count. Leave your phone in the car or kept off in you pocket or purse. You should have a good knowledge of the company. History, culture, etc. Visit if at all possible. Get a feel. See who works there.

There are too many tells to fool a good interviewer. Did I get a little off topic? Oh well, now you know some tips on how to get a job. Good luck!
How could someone prove a previous employer said something that prevented them getting the job?
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Old 01-24-2016, 05:25 PM
 
Location: NW Indiana
1,316 posts, read 1,181,943 times
Reputation: 2074
Quote:
Originally Posted by ialwayswin001 View Post
In the past 9 years I've worked 4 different jobs, one of which my boss was my relative and another where I am still in contact with my boss. Never did they mentioned that they were contacted when I applied for a job. I've applied and worked for big companies too, so it's not like I am applying for fast food restaurants. I am wondering is contacting past employers "outdated"? I always put yes on my resume even though my last boss didn't like me.
To return to the OPs original question, some companies do contact references. My references were contacted when I was interviewing for my current job and I have had several companies call about references for employees who used to work for me. I have even been called for personal references for friends, whom I had not professional relationship with.
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Old 01-24-2016, 05:46 PM
 
11,259 posts, read 8,414,613 times
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I think the only thing previous employers can say is whether or not you worked there.
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Old 01-24-2016, 05:46 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,463,311 times
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It's been rare that people have asked for a formal reference sheet. If you stay in the same industry, all the managers are 6 degrees from knowing everybody in their area of expertise.

You will be surprised by who they know. They might ask one of their employees that worked at your current or previous companies.

At my current job, all the interviewers mentioned my friend(who had left 6 months earlier) during the interview. I am sure they knew we worked together, because we came from the same dept. We were moving to the same dept in a new company.

At my previous job, my interviewer worked with my boss for over 10 years at their last company. I provided 3 references, even though it was not requested. She knew all three people. They had work in the same company for several years.

Good reputation is all the reference you need, when you stay in the same industry and just keep moving higher.

If you are changing industries often or even changing cities, references may come into play more.

Last edited by move4ward; 01-24-2016 at 05:55 PM..
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:04 PM
 
1,244 posts, read 2,984,745 times
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I was recently asked for my most recent employer's contact info, probably because I had not listed him as a reference. I left on (apparently) good terms, but the thing is that I only wound up with that supervisor because of a reorganization, and even though I had been attached to his department for nine months, he had never actually assigned me any work (I had been doing work for many people in different departments across the company, people who knew me and my work and who I did list as references). In fact I barely had any face time with him because we were in different buildings. I never listed him as a reference because I don't think he would have anything (good or bad) to say about me.
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Old 01-24-2016, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,446 posts, read 3,754,329 times
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In my experience, calling references is only used to see if our final candidate is lying and/or exaggerating about his or her background. We don't have time to call references of 50+ applicants to every job.

I'd say in about 1 out of 8, the reference check does reveal that the candidate lied about something. In one egregious case a couple years ago, we discovered that a candidate was on leave from his current employer pending resolution of sexual assault charges which he had not disclosed. It was very surprising - this was for one of our highest level jobs.
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Old 01-24-2016, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Upper Darby, PA
403 posts, read 315,147 times
Reputation: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
In my experience, calling references is only used to see if our final candidate is lying and/or exaggerating about his or her background. We don't have time to call references of 50+ applicants to every job.
I thought references were only called when someone is about to be offered the job.
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Old 01-25-2016, 12:35 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,487 posts, read 2,876,126 times
Reputation: 4006
Quote:
Originally Posted by WannabeCPA View Post
I just started my 6th job out of college and as far as I know this job was the first time a reference was called (2 of them in fact). I'm pretty sure that those references helped me get the job as I thought my interview went terrible. I was so surprised when they offered me. I'd say the vast majority of times potential employers don't contact past employers except maybe to confirm dates of employment. Still, it's good to have a few references you can count on when you actually do need a reference.
<sigh> this is confusing. Can people please clarify whether if they're referring to a professional reference, or the employer themselves? For the OP, I believe he's asking the latter


For the former, it's usually a supervisor or a manger that you reported to. In some cases, these people are no longer with the company. Here, they'll ask about what kind of person you were. It's almost like an interview for another candidate, as my boss has told me that he told them that he mentioned I'm a team player, but as a weakness, I sometimes take on too many things that I really couldn't handle.


for the latter, they'll call an HR person of that company, or the boss himself, and confirm dates of employment, salary, and title.



2 separate things.
In my case, the entire department I was in got laid off, so when they called the manager I reported to, he was unemployed. He was close to retirement so he just got a jump start on that early.
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Old 01-25-2016, 06:45 AM
 
17,241 posts, read 10,169,578 times
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And here we go again (and again).

Appears as if quite a few people still believe the myth that ALL companies will not divulge details on an employee besides dates worked, based on a supposed fear of a lawsuit.

As has been pointed out many times before here, there are no laws preventing an employer from giving details on a former employee besides dates of employment.

Sure, some places may not do so as policy, but not all places.

So it's not illegal to give details on why you were fired, your performance, etc., as long as it is true.

Plus there are many other ways to screen an employee.

It could be a simple matter of seeing whether the applicant is eligible for rehire. Or as mentioned above off hand off the record references in many industries where everyone knows each other.

Why else does practically every single advice on what to do after being fired mention that you should mention why you were fired but out a positive spin on it.

So if people want to believe that we live in a perfect and safe world where there are no repercussions for your prior actions, be my guest.
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