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Old 09-16-2016, 04:16 PM
 
6,853 posts, read 3,722,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LizfromtheBronx View Post
I have half a degree from UOP, and it really bugs me (for a non clinical role such as nursing that was mentioned above) that employers would look down on them. Let me tell you, these degrees are far more work than a traditional setting, where 50% of the battle is showing up. You are required to do a significant amount of work, 5 days a week, and write a paper every week.

....
Uh, no they are not more work; you just don't have the comparison to understand.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Geek View Post
Yeah, no. Have you done both? If so, then the traditional place you went was not all that great. You are the first person I've ever heard say that places like UoP are more work than traditional schools.

Unfortunately this isn't the first person I've heard say that. It's sad but usually from people for whom these places really are a challenge to get through. They really don't realize that having slightly more work than high school still isn't that hard on the college scale. It's sad because these schools prey on folks like that who would be much better off going to the local CC.
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Old 09-17-2016, 09:08 AM
 
563 posts, read 533,912 times
Reputation: 505
UoP is a for-profit college but long story short its legit and accredited,it has 91 physical campuses.
UOP is ok in public sector since its a check off box that you have a degree.
but in private section, managers can discriminate against this.
its worse than state schools tho and its frowned upon on and had stigma.
people should go to state/public schools
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Old 09-17-2016, 09:21 AM
 
Location: San Diego
35,217 posts, read 32,177,752 times
Reputation: 19762
A good friend of mine has been applying for mgt positions and it appears most larger businesses use a checkbox style form and if your degree/school isn't on there you can't even complete the application. No online ones were and that's where he got his. Let's just say frustrated puts it mildly.
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Old 09-17-2016, 09:30 AM
 
3,315 posts, read 1,880,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LizfromtheBronx View Post
I have done both, in addition to friends who have gone through traditional Master's programs and said they had much less work involved than the workload assigned with online courses. I'm not making a judgement on quality of difficulty of work, merely volume. When I was a student at UOP, the participation requirement was that you had to make 2 "quality" posts on 5 of 7 days of all 5 weeks of the course. Quality meant that you had to have a substantive response, not merely agreeing or disagreeing, but backing it up. This was in addition to whatever assignments were due that week, which was always a paper. In the last week of the course it was a group paper.
Yeah the content of the work is most likely the same as I know college is supposed to be difficult but I find that going to online school is a lot more difficult not only for what you said but you are more on your own. If you struggle the instructors are often not much help. I failed project management class..my grade was so low so I had to pay for it and take it again. I didn't understand it at all so I asked the instructor for help. They gave me vague solutions and basically just told me to read the text. My mom even tried to figure it out with me and yet I still failed.

Now I've never been to a traditional school but I would imagine the instructors are actually a lot more helpful. If they're not they wouldn't be in business right? Unlike schools like Phoenix they don't make you sink or swim on your own. Of course I'm not saying every instructor at a for profit school is like that but a lot of them were/are.
I didn't realize it was that bad until I enrolled but I still would have gone to a traditional school if I had learned to drive. I had an idea that it might be a little more difficult to do school online but I just thought that with a fair amount of challenge I could do it without much help because I've worked with computers all my life so I thought most of the work only required computer knowledge (even non computer related subjects because I could just research them on the internet). I also got pretty good grades in English in high school and loved to learn.
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Old 09-17-2016, 11:53 AM
 
6,853 posts, read 3,722,997 times
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Nickchick, "online" with UoP and other corporate schools that happen to offer online courses. Online is just the method of delivery and there are plenty of legitimate schools that use it. The fundamental problem is UoP and their ilk for the most part don't offer quality instruction, regardless of method of delivery.


Add that to the fact that online, self study is much harder than in class. I'm interested that you took Project Management as a class. Was this as a sophomore or junior? What preparation did you have for it? Reason I ask is Project Management is not something that should be taken without some solid underpinning (other than just an overview). There is an extensive Body of Knowledge that isn't self apparent without that underpinning.
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Old 09-17-2016, 09:54 PM
 
3,315 posts, read 1,880,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post


Add that to the fact that online, self study is much harder than in class. I'm interested that you took Project Management as a class. Was this as a sophomore or junior? What preparation did you have for it? Reason I ask is Project Management is not something that should be taken without some solid underpinning (other than just an overview). There is an extensive Body of Knowledge that isn't self apparent without that underpinning.

I don't remember which year I took it but I only went for the associate's. I never went on to do my bachelor's because of the rep of the school and I had already owed money as it was. It was a required class for my major and I didn't get any preparation that I recall. I was just put into the class without any prior courses that would be leading up to that. I am really not sure why it was required either because what does management have to do with the IT field?
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Old 09-18-2016, 09:12 AM
 
6,853 posts, read 3,722,997 times
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In answer to your question, Project Management is the methodology you would use to guide the implementation of an IT project. It would be used in just about any IT effort beyond help desk tech. But that said, it really is an advanced topic, more appropriate once someone has some experience in the field. Really wouldn't be something that would much help someone going for their first AA degree.
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Old 09-18-2016, 10:29 AM
 
2,347 posts, read 1,455,082 times
Reputation: 3112
I have done both brick and mortar and online classes. The amount of work and intensity has depended on the program itself. I haven't done UoP-- my online classes have been through state universities where the expectations are the same as they are for the place-based classes. The differences for online is that it's somewhat of a convenience (being able to log in from home for coursework, not having to waste time on commute) and it's not as interactive as being there in person.

UoP doesn't have a great reputation, but in some fields it really doesn't seem to matter. Some of my colleagues have gone through online diploma programs that are really easy and crappy compared to what I've experienced. Some have gone through programs that seem to be more in line. Accreditation matters if you're in a field where accreditation matters. Reputation matters if you're in a field where reputation matters. I don't know about your field, but completing a degree does indicate that you've done more academic work that someone who hasn't completed a degree. How much more work seems to be extremely variable.
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Old 09-19-2016, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,808 posts, read 13,297,378 times
Reputation: 15960
It really doesn't matter if the coursework is easy, hard, light, or heavy. What matters is are they teaching you valuable skills both hard and soft that are in demand by employers. The general consensus among employers in the private sector is no but the answer seems to be no for a lot of traditional nonprofit colleges as well. However, given the huge markup on for-profit schools compared to community colleges I see no reason to waste money on them.
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Old 09-20-2016, 12:45 PM
 
6,942 posts, read 3,066,967 times
Reputation: 4425
Quote:
Originally Posted by mco65 View Post
not sure but my wife finished her BS at Pheonix.. she makes way more $$$ than me so fortunately for her, the company she works for holds her work ethics and skills to a higher standard that the school on her diploma might indicate. The companies I have worked for in the past look at the degree as an accomplishment more so than the actual school, unless of course that school is IVEY league... states schools are no better or worse than for profit schools like Phx... JMO
Nationally recognized schools is what you want, they don't have to be ivy ... MIT is not ivy neither is Caltech.
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