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View Poll Results: What should employers value more?
Experience 19 82.61%
Education 4 17.39%
Voters: 23. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-29-2016, 11:10 AM
 
387 posts, read 368,452 times
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It seems like employers are becoming discriminatory over non-college graduates. Many employers would instead rather hire a college graduate over a non-college graduate even for a position that doesn't require a college degree. Some employers, like retailers and fast food restaurants, will only want to hire high school and college students or college graduates if anybody else. Some employers like Petsmart will ask if you plan on going to college and if you answer no that could automatically disqualify you for employment. So it stands that employers are indeed prejudice against non-college graduates and to me that is not good. Education level should be added to any non-discrimination policy as employers are required by law to equal opportunity. It is also important college is not for everybody and it isn't necessary. But anyway what should employers value more? Experience or education? You decide.
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Old 01-29-2016, 11:26 AM
 
10,058 posts, read 4,662,763 times
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Quote:
Some employers like Petsmart will ask if you plan on going to college and if you answer no that could automatically disqualify you for employment.
are you sure? It might be a round about way of asking, what's your 5-10 year plan...

Could you flip the question into that, as in if they ask and you say no, then give a reason why not (besides it's expensive), more like no, you have plans on working and using experience to move up? Then as you learn more about job, IF more education is required, you will obtain it at that point. Expanding on answer is better than just saying no and moving on to next question. It's just a young person who doesn't "aspire" for college, should have some other kind of aspirations... If there is none, why hire them when the next person will have some?
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Old 01-29-2016, 11:38 AM
 
387 posts, read 368,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eyeb View Post
are you sure? It might be a round about way of asking, what's your 5-10 year plan...

Could you flip the question into that, as in if they ask and you say no, then give a reason why not (besides it's expensive), more like no, you have plans on working and using experience to move up? Then as you learn more about job, IF more education is required, you will obtain it at that point. Expanding on answer is better than just saying no and moving on to next question. It's just a young person who doesn't "aspire" for college, should have some other kind of aspirations... If there is none, why hire them when the next person will have some?
I don't think the employer should ask that either. And besides no one can predict their future unless they ask a fortune teller. I myself don't know where I will be 5 to 10 years from now.
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Old 01-29-2016, 12:50 PM
 
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Wow! I wish that all the places I applied for in my 6 month job only cared about an college education. Although, I just graduated last December. But, still. Most professional jobs are looking for both a degree and experience, and there are jobs that substitute experience for a degree. Imagine being a freshly graduate college student with no experience looking for entry level positions that ask for a degree (cool), but also 2 years of experience!!! For an entry level job that consists of nothing more than answering phones, filing, and corresponding!

And not to mention jobs like being a restaurant server requiring 2 years of experience. I have a background in banquets and still couldn't find a restaurant that would hire me as a server.

Employers have gotten ridiculous nowadays!
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Old 01-29-2016, 01:11 PM
 
387 posts, read 368,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Having Faith in GA View Post
Wow! I wish that all the places I applied for in my 6 month job only cared about an college education. Although, I just graduated last December. But, still. Most professional jobs are looking for both a degree and experience, and there are jobs that substitute experience for a degree. Imagine being a freshly graduate college student with no experience looking for entry level positions that ask for a degree (cool), but also 2 years of experience!!! For an entry level job that consists of nothing more than answering phones, filing, and corresponding!

And not to mention jobs like being a restaurant server requiring 2 years of experience. I have a background in banquets and still couldn't find a restaurant that would hire me as a server.

Employers have gotten ridiculous nowadays!
Employers have indeed gotten ridiculous nowadays. If you go back 20 or 30 years ago employers were much more fair about hiring people and experience was all that mattered. You would only need a degree for certain occupations like a doctor or a lawyer.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:29 PM
 
6,846 posts, read 3,718,587 times
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There is no single answer to the question you asked. It's all very dependent on the job requirements as well as whether it's entry level or subject matter expert, or manager. The answer could be: Both. Neither. Experience. Education. And any combination along the way.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
I don't think the employer should ask that either. And besides no one can predict their future unless they ask a fortune teller. I myself don't know where I will be 5 to 10 years from now.
But you can have a plan for what you want to do and how you plan to get there. It's a very legitimate question to ask in an interview because the answer tells a lot about the applicant.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:57 PM
 
18,876 posts, read 7,342,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
. But anyway what should employers value more? Experience or education? You decide.


It is only right to let the decision rest with the employer. I spend my money as I please, and employers should do likewise.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:58 PM
 
18,876 posts, read 7,342,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
I don't think the employer should ask that either. And besides no one can predict their future unless they ask a fortune teller. I myself don't know where I will be 5 to 10 years from now.

and w/o a plan, why should they hire you?
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Old 01-31-2016, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Planet Telex
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When they ask you where you think you'll be 5-10 years from now, give a typical 'professional' response and tell them that you hope to learn and grow with the company. Then, ask them how many employees they have that have been with the company over 5 years. If they struggle to answer or tip-toe around the question, then you'll have a good idea of the culture and probably won't last as long either.
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Old 01-31-2016, 06:43 AM
 
2,736 posts, read 1,754,976 times
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That's like asking if a sports franchise should value speed or strength more. The bottom line is that for quality jobs, they need both.


If you graduate college without relevant work experience, you're going to struggle to find a job.
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