U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-13-2016, 10:24 AM
 
416 posts, read 269,454 times
Reputation: 436

Advertisements

Do they just provide dates of employment or do they act as another sort of reference for your performance/character?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-13-2016, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,847 posts, read 4,962,112 times
Reputation: 17327
If they're smart, the verify only that you worked there between two dates.

Any further disclosures could suck them into a lawsuit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2016, 10:34 AM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
12,611 posts, read 15,071,590 times
Reputation: 12151
It depends on the employer's policies. At a minimum, nothing. Usually, dates of employment, position held and title. I've had some of them also provide the reason for discharge.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2016, 03:18 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
1,357 posts, read 1,111,702 times
Reputation: 3438
The company that I work for actually has in their employee handbook that the only information they give out if contacted for a reference is the dates of employment. However, it really depends on the employer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2016, 03:45 PM
 
57 posts, read 36,227 times
Reputation: 183
I was just laid off and I asked this very question to my HR person! She said, legally they can only provide my job title and the dates I was employed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2016, 04:12 PM
 
9,266 posts, read 11,849,807 times
Reputation: 14540
The US Supreme Court said an employer is legally allowed to provide any and all information so long as its truthful and the disclosure is applied evenly. Unless a state passes some local law limiting the information provided, the feds could care less. The Court stated that a defense against defamation is truth.

There use to be a cottage industry of attorneys that would sue employers over disclosure issues in hopes that the employer will settle instead of going through a lengthy lawsuit. It worked for awhile. But, in response to this extortion, many states have passed employer protection laws that shield employers from these extortion threats. As a result, the number of claims over employer disclosures are very small and the number of attorneys willing to take these cases have all but dried up. You'll still hear people make the claim you can sue but in reality, nobody has posted in years of being successful (some have posted in the last year or so of having problems just finding an attorney to even look at the case).

There are a few states that have passed laws to limit what can be provided but they have left open many loopholes. What can and will your employer provide? Most companies have made the decision that you are no longer an employer contributing to their bottom line so why are they going to go out of their way to waste time telling your new employer what type of employee you are. So, they limit it to the simplest items and just don;t have to deal with it at all.

Now, one side effect of that once fear of a lawsuit is employers have decided that they will extend the limiting of information to good information as well. That's why you are finding companies who won't give or allow for positive references even though you were an outstanding employee. The old employer figured if these whinny ex-employees don't want the bad, why give the good? So, you'll read from time to time on this forum about those who complain like a small child who can't have the animal crackers that their employer refuses to give them a reference and as a result, the new employer thinks they wee a bad employee.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2016, 05:15 PM
 
17,310 posts, read 10,218,998 times
Reputation: 28838
Not this again.

I repeat once more.

Despite what some will say there are no laws against an employer giving out detailed info on a former employee besides dates of employment, as long as it is true.

Some will claim that their employer only gives dates for fear of a lawsuit. It may be for that company, but hardly all companies.

Not only that, but there are also subtle ways a company can categorize a former employer. Chief among this is whether the ex employee is eligible for rehire. Simple.

Bottom line is, you reap what you sow. If you left each job on good terms, you have nothing to fear. If you were let go due to layoffs or the like, that's part of life.

However, if you were fired due to bad performance of your own doing or conflicts/character issues due to your inability or unwillingness to flow the program, deal with it. Go ahead and threaten them with lawsuits for unfavorable reference and see them laugh at your efforts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2016, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX
15,030 posts, read 21,753,522 times
Reputation: 22235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink and Purple View Post
I was just laid off and I asked this very question to my HR person! She said, legally they can only provide my job title and the dates I was employed.
^^^ wrong. As long as an employer is truthful they can say anything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2016, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Planet Telex
4,662 posts, read 2,295,940 times
Reputation: 4386
Quote:
Originally Posted by veuvegirl View Post
As long as an employer is truthful they can say anything.
Do some lie though?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2016, 05:13 PM
 
9,781 posts, read 16,995,843 times
Reputation: 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink and Purple View Post
I was just laid off and I asked this very question to my HR person! She said, legally they can only provide my job title and the dates I was employed.
Your HR person is wrong, as has been discussed many times. It may be a violation of company policy to provide anything other than title and dates of employment, but it is certainly not against the law to do so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top