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Old 02-19-2016, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,010 posts, read 8,436,790 times
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My opinion is that giving a range is pointless. Once you give a range, the HM can focus solely on the low number.

Classic bargaining technique is would be to start high and come down.
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Old 02-19-2016, 12:58 PM
 
5,341 posts, read 5,314,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
My opinion is that giving a range is pointless. Once you give a range, the HM can focus solely on the low number.

Classic bargaining technique is would be to start high and come down.
Yup. 100% true. Giving the range is for form and future negotiation. That's why my (and others should be) range starts higher than my lowest amount.

So if I will accept 100k but say my range is 110-130 and they come in with 108, I can say that, given blah blah blah, I was really expecting a salary closer to the 120 mark (which still in range. If you only give them one number, you have less room to wiggle). And so it goes and we would likely end up in the neighborhood of 112.

Basically, I found that having a range gives more flexibility. Or at least some hope for flexibility.
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Old 02-19-2016, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Seattle Area
1,716 posts, read 1,590,934 times
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Meh...A candidate should be well educated about their value. There are so many tools available to do this, that not doing it shows me you aren't prepared. If someone won't give me an idea of the range, I will just pass. It's not worth having it.

When I am seeking a new job I tell them what I want. If that prices me out, then it wasn't the right job and I would have been unhappy there. If you confidently state your worth in terms of salary expectations it will be seen positively.
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Old 02-19-2016, 01:49 PM
 
Location: nYC
684 posts, read 502,579 times
Reputation: 334
I feel it is very unproductive to interview for a job without knowing the salary it pays. Often salary is all one knows, with current events. You really need Physical Address of where you are going to wok and an Idea of the compensation package.

There is a range of what a company will spend pier person in my profession. you can take all that money and cash it (1099) or you can go for benefits like if you need good health insurance coverage for your family.

Anyhow. I would not interview unless I am explicitly told the $$$$$$ part. I suppose if you know the job title and a zip code you can find out what range it pays.
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Old 02-19-2016, 02:12 PM
 
35 posts, read 25,174 times
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My opinion, give a range for what you need... be evasive about what you currently make, "I'd rather focus on my worth and value to the position here versus my current or previous positions."

But yes, the onus is on you entering the interview. You need to understand going in what you need/want. Honestly, if you don't, you're unprepared for the interview.
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Old 02-19-2016, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,010 posts, read 8,436,790 times
Reputation: 15621
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-fused View Post
Yup. 100% true. Giving the range is for form and future negotiation. That's why my (and others should be) range starts higher than my lowest amount.

So if I will accept 100k but say my range is 110-130 and they come in with 108, I can say that, given blah blah blah, I was really expecting a salary closer to the 120 mark (which still in range. If you only give them one number, you have less room to wiggle). And so it goes and we would likely end up in the neighborhood of 112.

Basically, I found that having a range gives more flexibility. Or at least some hope for flexibility.
If I were cutthroat and interested in hiring you, I would offer you $110, then hold firm. After all, you said that $110 was acceptable. I would willfully ignore your points about benefits and responsibilities.

If you told me $130, I would not worry about offering you $110, but expect to settle closer to $120.

Admittedly these are simple negotiation tactics, and YMMV.
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Old 02-20-2016, 05:50 PM
 
1,372 posts, read 1,116,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakscsd View Post
Meh...A candidate should be well educated about their value. There are so many tools available to do this, that not doing it shows me you aren't prepared. If someone won't give me an idea of the range, I will just pass. It's not worth having it.

When I am seeking a new job I tell them what I want. If that prices me out, then it wasn't the right job and I would have been unhappy there. If you confidently state your worth in terms of salary expectations it will be seen positively.
Agreed. I just give them a range and see what they come back with. I see no need to haggle over salary before a decision on job fit has been determined.
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Old 02-20-2016, 05:52 PM
 
1,372 posts, read 1,116,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felix C View Post
We all know the question. You are asked for your salary requirements or asked what you currently earn. Because a truly professional company will have already created a budget for that position as well as the published KSAs.

How do you respond. Appears a number of my young acquaintances are stumped by how to respond without revealing a number too high and be out of contention or too low and the company had more budgeted for the position.

I advised as follows which is to reverse the question back onto the interviewer in an non-confrontational manner.

If they ask you what is your number:

A. I do not believe salary is an issue if the company is offering salary which matches the stated duties and in line with the market.
Can you tell me what the budgeted range is?


If they ask you what you earned in the current position:

A. What I earn is probably in the same range as the position I am interviewing for as the duties are similar to what I currently execute. Can you tell me what the budgeted range is?

Sometimes the position advertised has the range and/or the questionnaire asks for current and requirements. But the thread question is for when the information is not known until an interview.
Be careful. Both of these responses sound too defensive, IMO.
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