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Old 06-24-2016, 02:36 PM
 
211 posts, read 299,529 times
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I am in the process of looking for a new position. I have plenty of references from former co-workers at my previous jobs and even some who I reported directly to?


My issue is the current job I am applying for is a management position. I currently have a quasi management position. However, they might want references from people at my current employer who I quasi manage and/or report in to.


When I asked this question to a friend who has been in Management for many years she said I should definitely have someone who I report to at my current position who can reference the job I do now. I don't want my current company to know I am looking else where. Also, my new manager is the reason I am looking as we do not care for each other and she is trying to demote me from my current position because of office politics.


How have others handled references from current employers when looking? I do have my last two year performance reviews that have been excellent to show the company if requested. I just know the end of year with this new manager will not be good so I am trying to find something before the end of the year.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:40 PM
 
918 posts, read 1,040,532 times
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Find that 1 friend in the company that will vouch for you. Have them lie if necessary
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Old 06-24-2016, 10:35 PM
 
789 posts, read 1,682,190 times
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I don't think any of this should be necessary. It is extremely common that you request that your job search remain confidential until you've accepted an offer and given notice. At that point is when the new company will typically call to confirm your current employment details, and may request a reference from your current job. Anywhere that you interview should have no problem respecting that your search is confidential and that they may not contact your current employer or any of your current coworkers until you've accepted an offer and given notice. The fact that your current employer promoted you to a position with management duties vouches for their faith in your abilities. The prospective employer will have to live with that and your word during the interviews to make a decision on whether or not to hire you for your management skills.
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Old 06-27-2016, 07:45 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 6,614,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aweitzm1 View Post
Also, my new manager is the reason I am looking as we do not care for each other
And that is the exact reason why I'm looking for a new job too. It isn't my boss, but his boss that I can't stand and he can't stand me either.

"People join companies, but people quit their managers." It probably isn't your fault either. Let's face it, there are a lot of asses in the workplace. The ass I'm dealing with enjoys yelling at subordinates for any little thing that isn't done EXACTLY the way he sees fit. Turnover is astronomical and he doesn't care. It's all about him and his power.

Use your old manager if you have his contact info. or use someone else in the company who isn't a sociopath. If they have ever reviewed any of your work, you can honestly refer to that person as a supervisor.
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Old 06-28-2016, 05:50 PM
 
6,219 posts, read 2,879,696 times
Reputation: 15779
My job counselor states:
References:- one from a former employer, one on character, one from business group/network.

Rarely have I been told I need any from my most recent/current employ. They are mostly limited in what they can say anyways.

If you have any certifications, sometimes they will ask for the instructors info. This gives them a lead into how you were in taking instructions and executing them.
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Old 06-29-2016, 11:39 AM
 
211 posts, read 299,529 times
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Thanks all for the advice.
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Old 06-29-2016, 09:39 PM
 
Location: KC, MO
799 posts, read 739,444 times
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Exclamation References

Quote:
Originally Posted by MainLineMommy View Post

The fact that your current employer promoted you to a position with management duties vouches for their faith in your abilities.
Greetings, MLM, hope you and yours have been well.....

You always give great advice so I hate to add something but it seems obvious.....

Your logic has a hole in it in that the new employer has no incentive or grounded evidence to know the OP's employer was correct in their putting 'aweitzm1' into management. "...vouches for their faith..." is not evidence of subsequent performance.

Just saying that because they did it is evidence enough is not really evidence at all.

Even if 'aweitzm1' has good metrics, there is always the possibility that behind those metrics, there were dollars lost needlessly on the way to the good metrics. I've seen this first-hand where a new policy meant to save hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance costs per year was executed poorly, causing morale, distribution and delivery problems that cost the company an equal amount in thousands of dollars in fines.

There could be blood-letting in the ranks; peer managers with gripes as to how the OP's running his/her department has negatively affected them/their own department; a drop in productivity/profitability, etc., etc.

Companies put up with bad managers all the time.....at least....for some period of time.

That s/he is in danger of being demoted raises the question of 'who is right and who is wrong?'....


I would suggest 'aweitzm1' get a reference from a same company peer manager whose own department interacts with his/hers. Obviously, such a person would need to agree to not blab but a letter coming from a peer manager, attesting to the good work 'aweitzm1' does is a step in the right direction. An assertion by that peer manager that the peer manager's department runs effectively because 'aweitzm1' runs his/her department well would help to convince the hiring company they are about to hire the right person.

Obviously, as you all have said, in the meantime, previous managers reported to would also be suitable and necessary references.


But just suggesting that because 'aweitzm1' is a manager is all the evidence the hiring company needs doesn't track. See it from their viewpoint, especially if they have other candidates they are interviewing who have current references from their up-line manager, giving them a competitive advantage.





Paul.........

..

Last edited by HeadhunterPaul; 06-29-2016 at 09:41 PM.. Reason: text edit
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