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Old 08-15-2016, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,685 posts, read 17,651,107 times
Reputation: 27772

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jribe View Post
if you don't have work experience, i would move to a cheaper state to get the experience (ideally at a big firm) and try NYC in 2-3 years when you'll have solid experience and your background of the area to help with the job.
Honestly, it's much easier to go from major metros to smaller towns once you get experience. The jobs are in major metros.
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Old 08-15-2016, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,028 posts, read 8,447,613 times
Reputation: 15639
Quote:
Originally Posted by jribe View Post
if you don't have work experience, i would move to a cheaper state to get the experience (ideally at a big firm) and try NYC in 2-3 years when you'll have solid experience and your background of the area to help with the job.
I disagree. NY can have weirdly narrow views. With so many people in the city, you can find specialists in virtually any field, and there will be a preference for that narrow subset.

As an example, the publishing industry is big in NY. However, book publishers often don't hire people with periodical publishing experience and vice versa. The rest of the country views this distinctions as minor variations within a field, in NY you will find people who view these as different industries.

Same thing for graphic design. I have one friend who does graphic design for liquor company marketing. He cannot get graphic design jobs in other industries in NY because he possesses the wrong specialty

The OP with a vague specialty such as finance may find him/her-self not qualified for many jobs in NY if they go into the wrong sub-field.
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Old 08-15-2016, 04:02 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
2,673 posts, read 2,022,689 times
Reputation: 3671
I would doubt that a company would relocate you. In NYC there's probably 3k applicants for any job and if even if you are qualified, the relocation is a $5k expense that they could save by continuing to look until the right candidate comes along.

Let's not forget that an off shore resource can be hired cheap and likely without a relocation expense.

If you were looking in a more out of the way place where there are less candidates, it's very likely that the company would pay for your relocation.

My wife got a job to move out of NYS within a week of looking in the new location. she was offered more than she asked, they gave her full moving expense coverage including sending movers to pack up our house, 2 round trip visits for the entire family, closing costs and 3 months of free storage.

After looking in North Carolina for a year with no bites, changing locations was a real eye opener and life changer.
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Old 08-15-2016, 04:40 PM
 
136 posts, read 97,702 times
Reputation: 55
Thank you all for the advice



Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
I disagree. NY can have weirdly narrow views. With so many people in the city, you can find specialists in virtually any field, and there will be a preference for that narrow subset.

As an example, the publishing industry is big in NY. However, book publishers often don't hire people with periodical publishing experience and vice versa. The rest of the country views this distinctions as minor variations within a field, in NY you will find people who view these as different industries.

Same thing for graphic design. I have one friend who does graphic design for liquor company marketing. He cannot get graphic design jobs in other industries in NY because he possesses the wrong specialty

The OP with a vague specialty such as finance may find him/her-self not qualified for many jobs in NY if they go into the wrong sub-field.
I have heard that NYC companies don't care about the experience you have from other states.

I work in legal services right now, so would you advise to apply to that same industry?

If worse comes to worst, would moving to NYC first to find a job make a difference (in relation to my work experience)?


Quote:
Originally Posted by gunslinger256 View Post
I would doubt that a company would relocate you. In NYC there's probably 3k applicants for any job and if even if you are qualified, the relocation is a $5k expense that they could save by continuing to look until the right candidate comes along.

Let's not forget that an off shore resource can be hired cheap and likely without a relocation expense.

If you were looking in a more out of the way place where there are less candidates, it's very likely that the company would pay for your relocation.

My wife got a job to move out of NYS within a week of looking in the new location. she was offered more than she asked, they gave her full moving expense coverage including sending movers to pack up our house, 2 round trip visits for the entire family, closing costs and 3 months of free storage.

After looking in North Carolina for a year with no bites, changing locations was a real eye opener and life changer.

Well, I'm doomed. I'm going to move to NYC eventually so I'm not expecting a relocation package.
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Old 08-15-2016, 07:08 PM
 
607 posts, read 1,171,038 times
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Based upon my limited experience, the bigger companies seem more willing to consider out of state candidates than smaller companies. I've applied for jobs out of state at companies of all sizes and I only ever got interview opportunities with the big companies.
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Old 08-15-2016, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,028 posts, read 8,447,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c114 View Post


I have heard that NYC companies don't care about the experience you have from other states.
That is a bit of an exaggeration, but there is often a prejudice against non NY experience. people often feel that non NY companies aren't the same volume or pace, so you need to sell yourself as being prepared for that.

Quote:
I work in legal services right now, so would you advise to apply to that same industry?
Sorry, not my industry. I can't give you an informed opinion.

Quote:
If worse comes to worst, would moving to NYC first to find a job make a difference (in relation to my work experience)?
That would be my advice, particularly since you have family in the area to rely on for a bit.
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Old 08-15-2016, 10:34 PM
 
136 posts, read 97,702 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by football45013 View Post
Based upon my limited experience, the bigger companies seem more willing to consider out of state candidates than smaller companies. I've applied for jobs out of state at companies of all sizes and I only ever got interview opportunities with the big companies.
I'm going to try that. Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
That is a bit of an exaggeration, but there is often a prejudice against non NY experience. people often feel that non NY companies aren't the same volume or pace, so you need to sell yourself as being prepared for that.



Sorry, not my industry. I can't give you an informed opinion.



That would be my advice, particularly since you have family in the area to rely on for a bit.
Thank you again for your advise! I need to start sharpening my skills in addition to my work experience then.
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Old 08-16-2016, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
11 posts, read 8,845 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by c114 View Post
I am not relocating just for the city life but that is a perk. I actually spent most of my childhood in NYC and all of my family are there. I can guarantee that there will be no culture shock for me. And like I said before, I already have housing secured so that won't be a problem.
Just to add to what others have said already - at the end of the day it comes down to the hiring manager or the individual that's making the first pass of the candidates to decide whether the risk involved with out of state candidate is worth it. ("If this out of state candidate is willing to move for this job, what's to keep him/her from moving again for another job?"; "What if the plans to move falls through the cracks?"; etc.)

Traditionally, reasons such as one you listed should be good enough to mitigate these big big risks and it's something that would often be mentioned in your cover letter. One thing you could add to help mitigate the risk further is to add a date to your move, more specific the better. i.e., "I am currently in the process of finalizing my move back to NYC in [September 2016] to be closer with my family" is helluva lot more reassuring than "I'm planning to move to NYC later this year".

Having said all this, companies these days are relying more on some form of resume filtering/ATS and less on cover letters; I have seen some large companies forgo cover letters altogether, unfortunately.
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Old 08-16-2016, 10:51 PM
 
136 posts, read 97,702 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keano10 View Post
Just to add to what others have said already - at the end of the day it comes down to the hiring manager or the individual that's making the first pass of the candidates to decide whether the risk involved with out of state candidate is worth it. ("If this out of state candidate is willing to move for this job, what's to keep him/her from moving again for another job?"; "What if the plans to move falls through the cracks?"; etc.)

Traditionally, reasons such as one you listed should be good enough to mitigate these big big risks and it's something that would often be mentioned in your cover letter. One thing you could add to help mitigate the risk further is to add a date to your move, more specific the better. i.e., "I am currently in the process of finalizing my move back to NYC in [September 2016] to be closer with my family" is helluva lot more reassuring than "I'm planning to move to NYC later this year".

Having said all this, companies these days are relying more on some form of resume filtering/ATS and less on cover letters; I have seen some large companies forgo cover letters altogether, unfortunately.
Right, I guess it will come down to my luck. I'm prepared

Thank you for your input!
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