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Old 07-30-2018, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,218 posts, read 8,576,233 times
Reputation: 15953

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
That's what the junk mail folder is for. Even after someone has applied, I will not respond, that's what HR is for. As a hiring manager I make the decision and will not be influenced by an email that's outside of our process. Actually I might be influenced negatively. If you want to follow up and make sure your application has been received, email HR, not the hiring manager. Your opportunity to express your interest was in the cover letter, and if selected for an interview, you will have an additional opportunity.

My thoughts exactly.

Any communication I have with candidates outside of the HR process is a negative from my point of view.

 
Old 07-30-2018, 02:36 PM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,414 posts, read 8,067,975 times
Reputation: 4863
Quote:
Originally Posted by PACareerChaser View Post
Let me clarify a few things. I emailed employers after submitting an application to take the extra steps in notifying them of my interest in the position. I only email those who are participants in the interview/hiring process meaning managers/directors whether in HR or in the actual department. Also let me make not, I just started doing this the second week of July. I have only emailed three employers thus far, most was emailed the end of last week.

I have talked to many Hiring Managers, and a lot of them recommend it. I was just asking for further opinions, but I see this is not popular with some of you on here.
If you just submitted an application/resume - how do you know who you'll be meeting with? If you're doing it after the fact, then it's really a thank you letter. I guess the point is that it's still confusing what you're looking to do. By submitting an application, you have already notified your interest. No further action is really required. And as another poster mentioned, additional communication to general email address (jobs@, resume@ or HR@, etc.) will likely be ignored.

In general - you can use a cover letter to further explain your interest (and some places won't read that either. or it'll not get to the actual hiring manager).

The problem with asking for opinion is that you'll get answers from across the spectrum. In the end, there is not wrong answer. The issue is whether the person making the final decision is going to be swayed....
 
Old 07-31-2018, 08:06 AM
 
654 posts, read 767,745 times
Reputation: 311
Employers here are full of clueless millenial managers who play childish games and ghost qualified candidates. It is tough to find a job here because of that crap/
 
Old 07-31-2018, 10:42 AM
 
Location: World
3,729 posts, read 3,566,542 times
Reputation: 2530
After ignoring e-mails, they claim that there are not enough STEM graduates in the country and start supporting H-1B program.

Many times, Hiring Managers are clueless !!!
 
Old 07-31-2018, 10:54 AM
 
86 posts, read 60,303 times
Reputation: 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by munna21977 View Post
After ignoring e-mails, they claim that there are not enough STEM graduates in the country and start supporting H-1B program.

Many times, Hiring Managers are clueless !!!
Exactly! They are dismissing qualified candidates by purposely being obtuse. Everyone says go the extra mile to express your interests. However, when you do, you're considered a nuisance.

The purpose of emailing them is taking additional steps to get them familiar with my name, my resume, and what all I have to bring to the table.

There is too much competition for jobs for me to end my job searching efforts at submitting an application.
 
Old 07-31-2018, 11:09 AM
 
86 posts, read 60,303 times
Reputation: 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by mixxalot View Post
Employers here are full of clueless millenial managers who play childish games and ghost qualified candidates. It is tough to find a job here because of that crap/
I agree. Like I stated, my intentions was to further show how I can be an asset to the company. There is so much competition for jobs who even knows if your resume would be looked at, let alone your cover letter.

Yeah, I am qualified, but so is 50 other guys. How can I show that I want it more than these 50 other guys? How can I show I am more innovative than these other guys?

But when you go the extra mile in expressing your interests, people are puzzle as to why are you doing so?

Mod cut.

Last edited by PJSaturn; 07-31-2018 at 09:53 PM.. Reason: Trolling.
 
Old 07-31-2018, 11:21 AM
 
11,305 posts, read 8,713,179 times
Reputation: 28524
OP, an email isn't innovative. Nor does it indicate a higher level of interest.

I understand You're just trying to feel more in control of the process.
 
Old 07-31-2018, 01:37 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 2,237,988 times
Reputation: 6142
Quote:
Originally Posted by PACareerChaser View Post
Do employers respond to emails? As part of my job search, I email employers to further let them know I am interested in working for the company. So my question to anyone who does hiring: do you answer emails of people seeking employment? If so, what tips do you have! I have had some email me back, but for others, nothing. The last time I was job searching was in 2016 and I was looking to make a career change into education. I emailed several people then, but only one responded. I don't know if they are swamped with emails, or just work in general or decided to leave the hiring process to HR. I'm not entirely too sure.

I don't care for calling employers because many note in fine print to not call, if they are interested in me, they will call me. I don't want to be seen as a nuisance.
Nothing wrong with your approach, but in how you are implementing it is the problem. You need someone to refer you to the hiring manager so that you have an introduction. So if I got an e-mail from someone I never heard of before, and the first thing they mention in their e-mail is, "John Doe in the XYZ department suggested I send you my resume to let you know about my interest in working in ABC group."

That's fine, because I will know this came from someone that I know. If it is totally unsolicated and it makes no reference to anyone I know, not even they are also a college alum then I don't take any action with it. Because I know they don't know me, the job or likely just doing a bulk e-mailing of e-mail addresses they got from someone. The biggest tip off, is if my name doesn't appear in the e-mail. Someone who doesn't know my name and just starts off with "Hi..." then to me that is SPAM.

You don't want to appear to be SPAM. Also, if someone does what I'm suggesting and even if there isn't an opening right now, I will keep in touch with them if they have good skills. Managers who don't do this, in my professional opinion are idiots and just like the idiots in HR. So if nothing happens because the manager is such an idiot, they did you a favor cause the last thing you want to do is work for a place that doesn't value people or doesn't respect someone who is taking the initiative to actually improve their career. Because in my professional experience, people who have made contact through non-advertised jobs who end up getting hired turn out to be the best employees. They are smart, resourceful, do great work and get along with others. The ones who simply reply to the cattle call of job openings and go through the huge committee process of 3 rounds of interviews turn out to have luke-warm reputations at work and the first to be let go during a layoff. You want to do everything in your power to by-pass HR to get to the hiring manager, and your approach is a very good one. You just need to tweak it.
 
Old 07-31-2018, 02:08 PM
 
86 posts, read 60,303 times
Reputation: 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastcoastguyz View Post
Nothing wrong with your approach, but in how you are implementing it is the problem. You need someone to refer you to the hiring manager so that you have an introduction. So if I got an e-mail from someone I never heard of before, and the first thing they mention in their e-mail is, "John Doe in the XYZ department suggested I send you my resume to let you know about my interest in working in ABC group."

That's fine, because I will know this came from someone that I know. If it is totally unsolicated and it makes no reference to anyone I know, not even they are also a college alum then I don't take any action with it. Because I know they don't know me, the job or likely just doing a bulk e-mailing of e-mail addresses they got from someone. The biggest tip off, is if my name doesn't appear in the e-mail. Someone who doesn't know my name and just starts off with "Hi..." then to me that is SPAM.

You don't want to appear to be SPAM. Also, if someone does what I'm suggesting and even if there isn't an opening right now, I will keep in touch with them if they have good skills. Managers who don't do this, in my professional opinion are idiots and just like the idiots in HR. So if nothing happens because the manager is such an idiot, they did you a favor cause the last thing you want to do is work for a place that doesn't value people or doesn't respect someone who is taking the initiative to actually improve their career. Because in my professional experience, people who have made contact through non-advertised jobs who end up getting hired turn out to be the best employees. They are smart, resourceful, do great work and get along with others. The ones who simply reply to the cattle call of job openings and go through the huge committee process of 3 rounds of interviews turn out to have luke-warm reputations at work and the first to be let go during a layoff. You want to do everything in your power to by-pass HR to get to the hiring manager, and your approach is a very good one. You just need to tweak it.
Great feedback! I send emails after submitting an application. My whole process includes getting their emails from a simple LinkedIn search where I find out who is in HR or who is the manager of my prospective department. Other times, I am able to get their information from the staff directory, which is widely available for everyone's use.

I really started this process last week. So far, I have emailed both HR and the Hiring Manager. I even got an email yesterday referring me to a Manager of my prospective department!

So my question to you is how do you email someone if you don't have any relations to them? How can you build a relationship? It has to start somewhere!
 
Old 07-31-2018, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Up Yonder
263 posts, read 466,694 times
Reputation: 237
This is similar to information I was given yesterday by a career coach who volunteers his time once a week giving advice. He has had years of experience and is still working as a consultant for companies. He said to find articles on companies that state they are growing. They don't necessarily have to have a job opening advertised. He said to send them an email ( you can call the company for the hiring manager's name - I have) stating you would love to help them grow and explain how you can do that in your email. You show you are taking the initiative by doing this. I been sending in resumes and feels like they go into a black hole. He also said about 20% of people get jobs that way. The other 80% network and use other methods, like reaching out. It seems like you have to get creative these days.
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