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Old 08-28-2018, 03:27 PM
Status: "Gaining Stability." (set 8 days ago)
 
5,684 posts, read 5,929,554 times
Reputation: 4432

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
Thanks for your responses, after thinking about it I decided to decline. I figure two bad signs (the interviewer and the bad review from a previous employee) are too much to ignore. I am sure I'll regret turning it down if nothing else comes up but I figure it's best to go with my gut. In the mean time I'll work on thickening up my skin. If anything, that manager is not someone I'd work well under if he tripped me up that much just in the brief interview.
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Old 08-28-2018, 03:30 PM
 
Location: planet earth
4,813 posts, read 1,828,987 times
Reputation: 10695
Always trust your gut.
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Old 08-28-2018, 03:53 PM
Status: "Gaining Stability." (set 8 days ago)
 
5,684 posts, read 5,929,554 times
Reputation: 4432
Quote:
Originally Posted by LLCNYC View Post
Dear God. Abusive?

People seriously overuse/misuse the term "abuse". Everyone "abuses" everyone at this point. Ridiculous.
When an abusive man meets a women, he does not immediately bash her skull in but they are signs.

It is ridiculous to believe this type of behavior is acceptable. The OP made the right choice. Perhaps you should apply for the position. I have been there and done that. Sometimes, you do not have a choice. If you do have a choice, I think you should pass. There is a difference between being a straight shooter and a jerk. I think he was actually being nice. No!
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Old 08-28-2018, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Whidbey Island, WA
12,270 posts, read 11,317,584 times
Reputation: 6114
He was trying to throw you off your game and did so. Learn from that and move forward.
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Old 08-28-2018, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
35,438 posts, read 10,481,794 times
Reputation: 33515
What, did this guy go to the Steve Jobs School of Interviewing Prospective Employees? What a jerk.

Sure, you didn't bring a resume--a forgivable offense in this day and age when almost everything is done online, and none of your other interviewers there had a hairball about it. He, on the other hand, was rude and seemed to delight in making you uncomfortable. He's not someone I'd want representing my company or working in an interviewing capacity.

Someone with your experience and abilities should be able to go to the company of your choice and say, Here I am. Hire me!

Only you know whether this place is a good fit, and maybe your interviewer isn't a good representation of the staff, anyway.

Good luck.
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Old 08-29-2018, 06:03 AM
 
1,857 posts, read 714,087 times
Reputation: 3965
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delahanty View Post
What, did this guy go to the Steve Jobs School of Interviewing Prospective Employees? What a jerk.

Sure, you didn't bring a resume--a forgivable offense in this day and age when almost everything is done online, and none of your other interviewers there had a hairball about it. He, on the other hand, was rude and seemed to delight in making you uncomfortable. He's not someone I'd want representing my company or working in an interviewing capacity.

Someone with your experience and abilities should be able to go to the company of your choice and say, Here I am. Hire me!

Only you know whether this place is a good fit, and maybe your interviewer isn't a good representation of the staff, anyway.

Good luck.
Actually, it was the rude interviewer that was truly unprepared for the interview. He should have already had the job candidate's resume in front of him before meeting the candidate. While the candidate should have had a hard copy available just in case, the rude manager showed a lack of preparation.

If I was going to interview someone, I would examine that candidate's resume BEFORE the actual interview, and have it available during the interview. While the rude interviewer may have been "testing" the candidate, showing off the interviewer's stupidity by being unprepared is not the way to go. As I said in a previous post, the company is also under scrutiny by the job candidate. If the interviewers at that company can't get their act together, that certainly doesn't inspire great confidence in working for them.
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Old 08-29-2018, 12:55 PM
Status: "Gaining Stability." (set 8 days ago)
 
5,684 posts, read 5,929,554 times
Reputation: 4432
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
Actually, it was the rude interviewer that was truly unprepared for the interview. He should have already had the job candidate's resume in front of him before meeting the candidate. While the candidate should have had a hard copy available just in case, the rude manager showed a lack of preparation.

If I was going to interview someone, I would examine that candidate's resume BEFORE the actual interview, and have it available during the interview. While the rude interviewer may have been "testing" the candidate, showing off the interviewer's stupidity by being unprepared is not the way to go. As I said in a previous post, the company is also under scrutiny by the job candidate. If the interviewers at that company can't get their act together, that certainly doesn't inspire great confidence in working for them.
Great post! I believe this is true. One of my interviewers did not have a copy of my resume. The person did not ask me for a copy. She was actually going to print another copy. I had copies. I have to say it made me look good but they did not expect me to have a copy. It is the electronic age. No one asks. I am old school.
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Old 08-29-2018, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
35,438 posts, read 10,481,794 times
Reputation: 33515
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
Actually, it was the rude interviewer that was truly unprepared for the interview. He should have already had the job candidate's resume in front of him before meeting the candidate. While the candidate should have had a hard copy available just in case, the rude manager showed a lack of preparation.

If I was going to interview someone, I would examine that candidate's resume BEFORE the actual interview, and have it available during the interview. While the rude interviewer may have been "testing" the candidate, showing off the interviewer's stupidity by being unprepared is not the way to go. As I said in a previous post, the company is also under scrutiny by the job candidate. If the interviewers at that company can't get their act together, that certainly doesn't inspire great confidence in working for them.

Don't look now, but I implied that in my response.
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Old 08-29-2018, 01:07 PM
 
Location: SC
8,791 posts, read 5,649,808 times
Reputation: 12805
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
Hi everyone! I'm currently on the job hunt. I had an in-person interview last week at a big corporate company in my city. Prior to the interview, I was excited about the prospect of working there. I'd already completed two phone interviews -- one with a recruiter and another with the guy who'd be my direct manager -- and both went really well. The company has exceptional employee benefits, ample PTO, and a seemingly fun/casual culture.

The in-person interview consisted of five mini-interviews with various managers in the department (which has probably 100-200 people). Everything was going seemingly well until I had a mini-interview with the head president of the department. As soon as we start, he asks me for a printed copy of my resume. I didn't have one. I'd applied online and inputted all my information into their online application and literally just didn't think to bring one. Each of the other four managers had my information pulled up onto their computer or printed out.

So I tell him "I'm sorry I don't have one" and he sort of fakes a reaction of shock and being offended and says, "OK... well I guess you'll need to tell me about yourself then because I don't have it written down." So that tripped me up a bit. During the interview he also was eating a cookie or something as I was talking, it just felt like he wasn't taking it very seriously or trying to give off an air of superiority, maybe because I was applying for an entry-level position and so considered somewhat expendable. And as the interview continued, he interrupted me at one point to correct my usage of a word, so mid-way through I felt like it really wasn't going well. At one point he asked point blank "Are you nervous?" I replied yes, I was a little nervous and he says "You seem extremely nervous and unsure of yourself." Finally, toward the end, he asked me a random question "Have you always been this smart? I think you're really smart and it'd be great to have someone with your intelligence on the team but you need to get it together when talking to the rest of the interviewers." I know that seems like a compliment but it just felt somewhat condescending after sort of belittling me prior.

So I left the interview feeling embarrassed for not bringing a resume and for being nervous and honestly much less excited about the job. But then two days later, I got an offer from the company. The salary offer was very good -- much higher than estimates online showed. I'm still hedging though, mostly because of that bad experience. I've had a number of job interviews and I've never been treated like that, though I've also never interviewed at a large corporation. Also, I don't think I'd be working under this guy directly, though he's the boss of everyone and I feel I'd interact with him often enough.

I ended up reaching out to a former employee at the company via LinkedIn (who had the same role I applied for until a few months ago) and she didn't have good things to say -- she described the culture in that department overall as somewhat toxic -- though I know it's not wise to judge based on one person's experience.

Do you think this interviewer's behavior was overtly rude or am I being too sensitive? Should I go with my gut feeling and decline, or give it a chance? I applied for an entry-level position and I see it's often filled by recent college graduates. I have about five years of professional work experience in this industry already but the specific role is somewhat of a career transition and would give me a chance to learn some different skills. I also don't want to pass up a good job over one bad experience. On the flip side, I've only been on the job hunt a few weeks and have gotten several bites, it seems like a pretty good economy to be looking for a job.
He sounds like an azz to me, and worse an unprepared azz who tried to pawn his deficit regarding the resume onto you.

Yes, he is rude and your friend confirmed it when she said that department was toxic.

If I were you, I would forget about that jerk, continue job shopping, and continue with the process at this company.

My next piece of advice will depend on whether you are a hopper or not. Is there a lot that can be learned at the job despite of the azz? What are the odds you will be asked to work for that azz? If it were me, and I knew going in that there was a lot to be gained and I would not have to work with him, I would think nothing of taking the job - but I would also be prepared to leave if I had to be in his close orbit.
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Old 08-29-2018, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Planet Telex
4,649 posts, read 2,287,789 times
Reputation: 4379
I've never had an interview where the interviewer did not already have a copy of my resume printed out in front of him.

I always bring extra copies just in case, but I never have to hand any out since they have copies when I get there.
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