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Old 08-28-2018, 07:11 PM
 
13 posts, read 8,188 times
Reputation: 10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Do this if you want to gain a reputation for being childish and rude. Consider how YOU would want to be treated if the positions were reversed? OP, talk to the employer whose letter you signed. Be honest. They knew you were looking and wouldn't be surprised that you were looking at multiple options. This sort of thing happens all the time. Then tell them you just received an offer that is a better fit for you at this point in your career. Thank them for their offer and consideration. If they ask for details and seem to want to re-negotiate, listen if you are genuinely interested. If not, thank them for their consideration but politely refuse.

You never know if or when you might need to do business with this company in future (if its in your field), so treating them respectfully is never a bad idea. Not like it's going to cost you a thing.
Parnassia, you're right. I am not going to ghost them. That is just wrong. I spoke to my friend's mom, who is a retired HR director at a large company. She was in HR for over 30 years. She said to me that in her 30 years in HR, she saw that happen many times. People did it for high level management jobs and lower level jobs alike. Then she said to me, "Is it wrong? Yes. Is it unprofessional? Yes. Should you not do that often? Definitely. Will you burn your bridges with that employer? Most likely yes. But it's not like it's unprecedented." She also confirmed what I said in my original post, that even if I signed a contract, it's very unlikely that they would pursue a lawsuit. The legal costs would be more than the actual damages incurred. It would be more cost effective just to get someone else.
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Old 08-28-2018, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Whidbey Island, WA
12,272 posts, read 11,324,314 times
Reputation: 6119
Have you accepted the 2nd offer and when did you receive it?
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Old 08-28-2018, 08:25 PM
 
13 posts, read 8,188 times
Reputation: 10
I received it today.
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Old 08-28-2018, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,959 posts, read 8,406,922 times
Reputation: 15556
Your friend’s mom is correct on all counts.

Employment at will means you can leave at any time. This company will probably note you as not eligible for rehire, but they aren’t going to sue you. They have no grounds to do so in at at-will arrangement.

You will be taking a small risk that job B falls through and you wing up with nothing, but such is life.
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Old 08-29-2018, 05:45 AM
 
1,862 posts, read 717,074 times
Reputation: 3980
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobdog357 View Post
Ghost them. Employers don't have your interest. Why should you? Especially to one you only signed an offer of employment with. It's an offer, not a contract. There is no specification of performance on your part, and you did not get paid anything so far. As such there is no contract, implied contract, express contract, no legal binding on you or your employer. Either can back out and can back out even while you begin work.

Either that or you can tell the first employer that I'm sorry I signed the offer but company XYZ just gave me an offer for this much. I know I signed but I just can't pass them up. Can you match company XYZ's offer? If not, then say bye bye. At least you're being honest.
Agree. With "At Will" employment with either party able to fire or quit for any reason or no reason, dropping that employer is not a big deal.

I would suggest contacting the first employer and being upfront with what you are going to do. You don't have anything to be embarrassed about. They can't stop you, and as another poster had said it happens all the time. You have to look out for your own interests. When companies lay off or fire people, they don't ask those people for permission to do so or worry about the impact that will cause.
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Old 08-31-2018, 03:52 AM
Status: "Gaining Stability." (set 11 days ago)
 
5,684 posts, read 5,934,902 times
Reputation: 4432
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRusso81592 View Post
There is no recruiter involved. I found this position on my own, on Indeed.com, as I did with the second position.
I meant the talent specialist at the company.
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Old 08-31-2018, 03:55 AM
Status: "Gaining Stability." (set 11 days ago)
 
5,684 posts, read 5,934,902 times
Reputation: 4432
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Do this if you want to gain a reputation for being childish and rude. Consider how YOU would want to be treated if the positions were reversed? OP, talk to the employer whose letter you signed. Be honest. They knew you were looking and wouldn't be surprised that you were looking at multiple options. This sort of thing happens all the time. Then tell them you just received an offer that is a better fit for you at this point in your career. Thank them for their offer and consideration. If they ask for details and seem to want to re-negotiate, listen if you are genuinely interested. If not, thank them for their consideration but politely refuse.

You never know if or when you might need to do business with this company in future (if its in your field), so treating them respectfully is never a bad idea. Not like it's going to cost you a thing.
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Old 08-31-2018, 09:24 AM
 
Location: indianapolis.
300 posts, read 108,000 times
Reputation: 630
You can absolutely withdraw an acceptance, it happens in large corporations all the time.

The courteous thing to do would be to either call or email the person you worked with re: the accepted offer and politely (but briefly! do NOT elaborate, do not mention a better offer, do not pass go, do not collect $200) explain that your circumstances have changed and you need to withdraw. Thank them for their time and ... that's it. Move on.
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Old 08-31-2018, 09:30 AM
 
2,082 posts, read 1,857,601 times
Reputation: 2680
Look, call them and be honest. Tell them that unfortunately you wont be able to accept the position because you were offered another one.

You're over thinking it.
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Old 08-31-2018, 11:30 AM
 
708 posts, read 777,411 times
Reputation: 1753
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunalvr View Post
You can absolutely withdraw an acceptance, it happens in large corporations all the time.

The courteous thing to do would be to either call or email the person you worked with re: the accepted offer and politely (but briefly! do NOT elaborate, do not mention a better offer, do not pass go, do not collect $200) explain that your circumstances have changed and you need to withdraw. Thank them for their time and ... that's it. Move on.
This. Donít get into details, but be respectful. You never know if you may end up going for a position with this company in the future, so a brief, polite withdrawal is best.
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