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Old 09-05-2018, 06:58 PM
 
92 posts, read 42,639 times
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In your experience, once you ask for a specific salary, is it something you can't go back on? I have given companies a desired salary before, and could tell by the response that I asked for lower than they can pay.

If you were moving for a job, would you say going back on the original salary asked for relocation expenses is a no go?
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Old 09-06-2018, 08:26 AM
 
9,778 posts, read 16,979,525 times
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Do you mean you asked for "higher" than they can pay? Were you unemployed and in need of a job? Did you value yourself too highly? Is there an offer on the table? You can certainly try to negotiate. The company may think it makes the most financial sense to pay you less and give you relocation expenses, they may stand firm, or they may move to the next person on the list. How difficult is it to fill that position, and how badly do they want YOU?
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Old 09-06-2018, 09:41 AM
 
1,550 posts, read 401,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newintown89 View Post
In your experience, once you ask for a specific salary, is it something you can't go back on? I have given companies a desired salary before, and could tell by the response that I asked for lower than they can pay.

If you were moving for a job, would you say going back on the original salary asked for relocation expenses is a no go?
Everything is negotiable at any time in the entire hiring process. When they ask you about salary you can say I want $100K a year. But when the offer comes in, you can ask for $120K and relocation. You can go back and forth on this, it is part of the negotiation.

A friend of mine was flown in for a job interview at company expense where he was told there would be no relocation package by HR. But when the offer came in he said he would need a relocation package and got it.

So until you have accepted a written offer, it is all up for negotiation. There is no game where, "You said $100K before, you can't ask for more now...", no, it doesn't work that way and people in HR and the hiring manager know this.

But you have to know their range and what they are willing to go for. You can't do this if you are asking for $150K and that is more than what the hiring manager is making.

And before anyone tells you different, HR or the hiring manger doesn't get "upset" about this. Articles and interviews with people in HR have revealed they do counter the request, but most people don't even ask for you. You ask for more, then they start to feel you must be worth more. That's how it works.

A friend of mine who has worked in academia his whole life is completely scared to negotiate with a company in private industry and after decades of experience in a field which has high demand for his skills, he always ends up making half what he should get. I know because he tells me and complains about it. It is because he has this misguided fear that if he asked for more money they will immediately withdraw the offer. What he doesn't know, is that HR laughs to themselves when they low-ball him and he accepts it.
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Old 09-06-2018, 12:46 PM
 
Location: indianapolis.
300 posts, read 107,939 times
Reputation: 630
Yeah, why not? If you gave a solid number and you don't think it's high enough, use the number you initially gave as your low-point in an expected range when it's time to start truly negotiating. You really shouldn't have to explain yourself much, if at all. Most mid-level positions in corporate settings have some sort of salary grade already assigned to them as a method of budgeting. If your suspicion turns out to be true, they shouldn't bat an eye when you ask for something different, especially because they've likely already planned to settle somewhere within a predetermined range.
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Old 09-06-2018, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,142,356 times
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I try to always go with "flexible", "open ", or "negotiable" instead of listing a number. That way, I'm not locked into anything, it makes me seem more flexible, and I can't automatically be eliminated before interviewing due to asking for too much or low-balling and seeming low quality or unconfident.
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