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Old 10-11-2018, 09:58 AM
 
1,580 posts, read 824,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
Not thinking very carefully I'd say. Many attorneys have undergrad degrees in Liberal Arts such as Philosophy. I know many people in the IT field that don't have STEMS degrees. What you have the degree in really doesn't matter much anymore, just that you have one and it's from an accredited school. Employers want experience plus a degree.
As someone with a General Studies degree, I beg to differ.
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:14 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,777 posts, read 54,424,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
Not thinking very carefully I'd say. Many attorneys have undergrad degrees in Liberal Arts such as Philosophy. I know many people in the IT field that don't have STEMS degrees. What you have the degree in really doesn't matter much anymore, just that you have one and it's from an accredited school. Employers want experience plus a degree.
it depends, but we do have many jobs requiring a degree (any) and experience. The lowest level position in my group (commercial/industrial real estate) starts at about $50k and requires 2 years college (no degree) but 3 years experience. As recently as 2 years ago we would get 50 people including attorneys and MBAs applying, now we get 15-20 people of which half don't meet any of the requirements. My boss (director) has a degree in art, I'm a manager with a psych degree. Experience is far more critical than the major, however for our IT people, engineers, accounting and finance the specific degree and experience are more equal in value.
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:31 PM
 
3,756 posts, read 2,123,163 times
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Its may be a problem. But you don't want to be underemployed for too long either or you may remain underemployed forever as well.

Underemployment is a bigger problem than unemployment at the moment. Maybe some people don't want to just "Take any old job" or be stuck settling because they may remain stuck.

The stigma is just as bad with "Why he/she doing this if they have a degree" as "Why isn't he/she working"

Falling into the underemployment trap sucks just as much as being out of work. In some cases if may even be WORSE. At least when you aren't working you can dedicate lots of your time to finding a good job. Its more difficult to do when you're working some lousy job full time you can't break out of
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Old 10-14-2018, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,580 posts, read 17,553,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DorianRo View Post
Its may be a problem. But you don't want to be underemployed for too long either or you may remain underemployed forever as well.

Underemployment is a bigger problem than unemployment at the moment. Maybe some people don't want to just "Take any old job" or be stuck settling because they may remain stuck.

The stigma is just as bad with "Why he/she doing this if they have a degree" as "Why isn't he/she working"

Falling into the underemployment trap sucks just as much as being out of work. In some cases if may even be WORSE. At least when you aren't working you can dedicate lots of your time to finding a good job. Its more difficult to do when you're working some lousy job full time you can't break out of
And then if you deviate from the prescribed line, you're screwed too.
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Old 10-14-2018, 09:44 PM
 
2,614 posts, read 2,242,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DorianRo View Post
Its may be a problem. But you don't want to be underemployed for too long either or you may remain underemployed forever as well.

Underemployment is a bigger problem than unemployment at the moment. Maybe some people don't want to just "Take any old job" or be stuck settling because they may remain stuck.

The stigma is just as bad with "Why he/she doing this if they have a degree" as "Why isn't he/she working"

Falling into the underemployment trap sucks just as much as being out of work. In some cases if may even be WORSE. At least when you aren't working you can dedicate lots of your time to finding a good job. Its more difficult to do when you're working some lousy job full time you can't break out of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
And then if you deviate from the prescribed line, you're screwed too.
Only perfect people need apply because we aren't hiring anybody else, and they really mean it.


You would think once they ran out of those people, when the economy came back some, companies would change and go back to old norms, but that isn't happening at all.
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Old 10-19-2018, 08:59 AM
 
1,580 posts, read 824,403 times
Reputation: 2209
Quote:
Originally Posted by DorianRo View Post
Its may be a problem. But you don't want to be underemployed for too long either or you may remain underemployed forever as well.

Underemployment is a bigger problem than unemployment at the moment. Maybe some people don't want to just "Take any old job" or be stuck settling because they may remain stuck.

The stigma is just as bad with "Why he/she doing this if they have a degree" as "Why isn't he/she working"

Falling into the underemployment trap sucks just as much as being out of work. In some cases if may even be WORSE. At least when you aren't working you can dedicate lots of your time to finding a good job. Its more difficult to do when you're working some lousy job full time you can't break out of
This makes a very good point. Although, personally, I think it looks better to be working, once you take a less desirable job because you need to get back to work, you are no longer open to interviewing for the desirable jobs. Unless you have a specialized skill or you are applying for executive positions, most people just aren't going to be willing to extend their work hours in order to interview you. I suppose you could say you have "an emergency", but that's about it. With a new job, you can't call in sick, you can't take a vacation day in order to go to an interview.
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Old 10-19-2018, 12:50 PM
 
2,419 posts, read 689,094 times
Reputation: 3398
Let's assume they actually got a degree in something employable. If they haven't got a job in their field, it is because that employers require experience for entry level jobs. When they get rejected for jobs for not having experience, they then get a McJob to make ends meet. Employers then won't count that experience toward their degree major field job. So they're stuck in a McJob.
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Old 10-19-2018, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,232 posts, read 1,417,095 times
Reputation: 1676
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
A lot of those folks didn't recover well. One of my best friends had a finance degree from the state flagship. He got stuck working as an account manager at a rent-a-center and never got back on track. I have friends, who are now in their early 30s, who never got onto a career track after the damage in the recession.
This has been an observable phenomenon in the US economy since the Great Depression and its second crash of 1937. Friends of my grandfather who unluckily graduated in 1928 or 1929 simply could not get things together (until the War). After WW2 ended, these men were already in their late 30s, and they were often put to pasture by the flood of victory vets returning home from Berlin and Tokyo. My grandfather himself had problems graduating from the University of Iowa right into the 1920 contraction.

This happened again with the modern-day recessions of 1973, 1982, 1990, 2000, and of course the Great Recession of 2008. This is one reason why "safety net" policies have broad support, because we all know a few people who never got "well" after early struggles.
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Old 11-04-2018, 08:51 AM
 
Location: USA
8 posts, read 4,097 times
Reputation: 13
I heard this many times especially form students as they often arenít aware of their own skills and experience, or what different jobs require. They donít know how to write correctly the resume in a professional way. Many college graduates are eager to find work ó and work. But that first job, however arbitrary, can impact the rest of their career. And this any work can help in the future to find the desired job. The main thing is to mention all your skills and experience in your resume.
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