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Old 12-19-2018, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
245 posts, read 68,823 times
Reputation: 186

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1.) Government jobs do a great job of showing the salary ranges for jobs and they need to make it a mandatory requirement for the private sector to do the same. I shouldn't have to make a useless account with glassdoor to see "average" salaries which are not even available most of the time.

2.) Companies and agencies should let potential job seekers know up front if a cover letter is required. This would save all of us so much time if we knew how they operate and did not have to guess which ends up with us having to write cover letters that might end up being pointless. It would actually be much more useful if companies used more assessments instead of cover letters that anyone can bs on.

3.) Private companies also need to be up front and reveal how most of their employees are being hired. I do not need a forbes or businessinsider article telling me that most candidates get jobs through "referrals". If 70% of JP Morgans jobs are through referrals then I should know that so I do not waste my time applying to their company unless of course I know someone.

4.) Companies and agencies need to be more realistic with what Entry level is. It should be a law that entry level jobs need to only consist of 0 - 2 years of experience (work, internship, and self education/certifications). How can an entry level job demand 5 years of experience? After 5 years you are definitely no longer at Entry, especially when salary is factored in.

5.) I understand most people end up getting careers in fields they did not take in school but I do think the education requirements have to be fully met. A person with an finance degree should not be getting skipped and dealing with competition with someone with an Art degree who happens to know someone at a big company. I think it should be mandatory that companies make the degree a 100% required qualification unless of course the candidate shows that they have been using their time to get educated on the topic which is what I am doing with a few courses in UMEDY ( Financial Analysis, Excel for Financial Modeling, SQL etc for compliance and risk related role). I have an MPA degree btw with classwork in auditing and government accounting.

Fix these 5 major issues and job seekers and employers will have less headaches.

If anything I said is wrong, or if there are resources that can better help me, or if you simply do not agree please let me know and fix my errors.

Thanks.
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Old 12-19-2018, 03:57 PM
 
11,160 posts, read 8,567,464 times
Reputation: 28161
No need for legislation or sour grapes.

1. Know the salary YOU want. Sending out a resume/online app is no skin off ones nose. However, if you get a call, ask if your number is a possibility. If not, move on.

2. I've stopped doing cover letters for private industry jobs. If you don't want to do one, don't do it. Own your decision.

3. Irrelevant. Even if 70% are hired from personal referrals, that leaves 30%. Mentally, plan on being in the 30% and apply anyway. The only sure guaranteed way of knowing you won't get a job is to not apply.

4. Get over the term "entry level." Jobs exist for ALL levels of experience including no experience.

5. There's more to getting a job than having a specific education. I work with Senior Vice President, IT Technology Managers who have degrees in German, graphic design, etc. The paper gets your foot in the door. After that, ones career is up to them and their level of drive, vision, and determination. Get in where you can and move up/over to what you really want.
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Old 12-19-2018, 06:29 PM
 
2,477 posts, read 704,890 times
Reputation: 3446
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveFashion View Post
1.) Government jobs do a great job of showing the salary ranges for jobs and they need to make it a mandatory requirement for the private sector to do the same. I shouldn't have to make a useless account with glassdoor to see "average" salaries which are not even available most of the time.
In the meantime, one can work around this. Find out the salary range for the position in question.

Then when recruiters approach you, ask them what the pay range of the position is. Pay attention to how they react to this request.

* if they demand your numbers but won't give them their numbers, they're playing power games and are not worth working for. Walk away.

* if they say they don't have a range, they're lying and are not worth working for. Every position has a budget and they're just playing fishing games. Walk away.

* if they offer you below the market range for the position, they are not worth working for. Walk away.

* If they are offering you a market (or better) range, put yourself in that range. Then continue discussions, they may be worth working for.


Quote:
2.) Companies and agencies should let potential job seekers know up front if a cover letter is required. This would save all of us so much time if we knew how they operate and did not have to guess which ends up with us having to write cover letters that might end up being pointless. It would actually be much more useful if companies used more assessments instead of cover letters that anyone can bs on.
Assume a cover letter is not required. Few recruiters ask for one.

Quote:
3.) Private companies also need to be up front and reveal how most of their employees are being hired. I do not need a forbes or businessinsider article telling me that most candidates get jobs through "referrals". If 70% of JP Morgans jobs are through referrals then I should know that so I do not waste my time applying to their company unless of course I know someone.
Or you can not apply through their applicant tracking system. Give your resume directly to a live human being - by email or in person.

Quote:
4.) Companies and agencies need to be more realistic with what Entry level is. It should be a law that entry level jobs need to only consist of 0 - 2 years of experience (work, internship, and self education/certifications). How can an entry level job demand 5 years of experience? After 5 years you are definitely no longer at Entry, especially when salary is factored in
.

This definitely needs a law against requiring experience for an "entry level" job. One cannot climb the corporate ladder if they're not allowed in, in the first place.

Career changers and recent grads are locked out of the job market.

Quote:
I think it should be mandatory that companies make the degree a 100% required qualification unless of course the candidate shows that they have been using their time to get educated on the topic which is what I am doing with a few courses in UMEDY ( Financial Analysis, Excel for Financial Modeling, SQL etc for compliance and risk related role).
Your idea does not work for career changers.

If the degree is in one area and the person did a career change to another area, they'd get rejected with your criteria. Your idea would lock people into one career track for life. No hope for career changers.
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Old 12-19-2018, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
245 posts, read 68,823 times
Reputation: 186
I see both your points in point 5, but wouldn't a career changer still need the required education?

And the both of you are correct. I will opt to not submit a cover letter unless of course its a government sector job.
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Old 12-20-2018, 08:03 AM
 
11,160 posts, read 8,567,464 times
Reputation: 28161
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveFashion View Post
I see both your points in point 5, but wouldn't a career changer still need the required education?

And the both of you are correct. I will opt to not submit a cover letter unless of course its a government sector job.
I changed careers in my mid 40s. I have a business degree in marketing. I now work in IT project management. I have certifications and I learned a lot on the job as I made lateral moves.
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Old 12-20-2018, 04:57 PM
 
2,477 posts, read 704,890 times
Reputation: 3446
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveFashion View Post
I see both your points in point 5, but wouldn't a career changer still need the required education?
Yes, career changers need the required education. The problem is trying to get the job when the employer does not count experience in a previous roles, treating you as if you have zero experience. Except for sales and mcjobs, there are no entry level jobs that require no experience.
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Old 01-04-2019, 01:51 PM
 
122 posts, read 91,617 times
Reputation: 237
Have you read the job requirements of many of the job postings out there lately? Everyone wants 7-10 years experience, very specific experience, 5 different certifications and the job listings include two jobs rolled into one. I have been applying to any job I may be a fit for, even if I’m overqualified or under qualified, and it’s been extremely disheartening. I must have taken at least 5 different assessment exams and applied to over 70 positions since September.

I was in medical sales for a decade with top numbers and rankings, went back and got a masters because I didn’t want to do sales anymore and wanted to change careers, had a paid internship with great recommendation, took a few years off to have kids and move to 4 cities in 6 years, and I have been applying for jobs full time, days, nights and weekends for about 5 months. I am in my mid-30’s, have a masters, stellar recommendations, I’m extremely motivated and intelligent, and I can’t even get an interview for jobs I am beyond overqualified for, like a sales assistant or admin assistant.

New grads and career changers are definitely locked out, and unless you have an internal referral, applying to jobs online is almost useless. My friend is a specialized doctor and she had a similar experience where half the jobs she applied to she never heard anything at all, 1/4 of them were not real opportunities or they were basically collecting resumes/considering maybe adding a position, and maybe 1/4 to 1/6 of the applications wound up being viable job opportunities, and it took her a year to find a job.

I keep hearing all of these headlines about how employers are facing a shortage of employees, and it’s very anecdotal, but of all of my friends and coworkers from 5 different cities along the east coast, all with a minimum of an undergrad degree and 15 years experience, have had similar struggles. Three friends’ husband were laid off within 3 weeks before Christmas. My neighbor, who is an exec at a large company on the West Coast (starts with an E) has a husband with an MBA who worked for GE and PWC, among others, and hasn’t been able to find a job for years.

I know I’m pessimistic due to my circumstances, but it seems like there are fewer openings and less hiring than the numbers and headlines would have us believe. Perhaps companies post jobs that aren’t really open to bolster their own numbers and the economy as well? I don’t have the answers, but thousands of comments of job seekers on LinkedIn seem to confirm this problem.
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Old 01-05-2019, 06:05 AM
 
11,160 posts, read 8,567,464 times
Reputation: 28161
Quote:
Originally Posted by budgetwise5 View Post
I was in medical sales for a decade with top numbers and rankings, went back and got a masters because I didn’t want to do sales anymore and wanted to change careers, had a paid internship with great recommendation, took a few years off to have kids and move to 4 cities in 6 years, and I have been applying for jobs full time, days, nights and weekends for about 5 months. I am in my mid-30’s, have a masters, stellar recommendations, I’m extremely motivated and intelligent, and I can’t even get an interview for jobs I am beyond overqualified for, like a sales assistant or admin assistant.
A moment of reality.

1. You've been intentionally out of the workforce for years. Everybody else stayed in.
2. You've moved around and aren't free to relocate.
3. Your master's degree doesn't mean your automatically qualified for any job you apply to.
4. You were in medical sales as WHAT? A top ranked salesperson or admin staff?
5. You got a master in what field? What were your plans? I am assuming you got your masters AFTER you stopped working and had kids. Did you ever execute your original plan?
6. Why are you applying for admin jobs? Use your medical sales history, education, and create a new career narrative that puts you somewhere else besides random admin work. You should look at all of the medical related companies and facilities in your area and see the types of jobs they offer.

As far as the admin thing, you have to remember that you are competing with career admin people. Someone with no degree, but multiple years of straight, direct admin work will always get the job over you. Employers want admin people who are career admin people. They don't want people who are "settling" for an admin job.

I changed careers in my late 40s so it can be done.
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Old 01-06-2019, 09:15 PM
 
122 posts, read 91,617 times
Reputation: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
A moment of reality.

1. You've been intentionally out of the workforce for years. Everybody else stayed in.
2. You've moved around and aren't free to relocate.
3. Your master's degree doesn't mean your automatically qualified for any job you apply to.
4. You were in medical sales as WHAT? A top ranked salesperson or admin staff?
5. You got a master in what field? What were your plans? I am assuming you got your masters AFTER you stopped working and had kids. Did you ever execute your original plan?
6. Why are you applying for admin jobs? Use your medical sales history, education, and create a new career narrative that puts you somewhere else besides random admin work. You should look at all of the medical related companies and facilities in your area and see the types of jobs they offer.

As far as the admin thing, you have to remember that you are competing with career admin people. Someone with no degree, but multiple years of straight, direct admin work will always get the job over you. Employers want admin people who are career admin people. They don't want people who are "settling" for an admin job.

I changed careers in my late 40s so it can be done.
I pursued my masters before kids, I chose to change careers because I just didn’t see myself still knocking on doors and being seen as that annoying rep at 65, constantly having sales numbers over my head, and changing jobs due to mergers/acqusitions/managerial conflicts every few years.

I completed my masters in healthcare administration and management because after 12 years in sales, I didn’t want to do sales anymore, but I truly enjoy the healthcare field and wanted to remain in the field. I have many friends and even friends’ spouses that are in medical/dental sales, and it’s a tough industry that can be difficult to transition out of, and they are constantly switching jobs or working for different companies every 2 years. That gets exhausting after a while.

I have been searching and applying for any healthcare related job in my area for months. When I say admin jobs, I’m not looking to be an office secretary or receptionist, I’m looking at network management, healthcare insurance contracting, recruitment, talent acquisition, research associate, sales analyst, basically anything that I might be qualified for just to get my foot back in the door and back into the workforce. I have applied to jobs that I am more than qualified for, but then the hiring manager tells me I’m overqualified and that the jobs are for entry-level grads making $30k per year. I can’t get past the ATS systems for most jobs that I apply to, even having private/independent contract work listed as current work experience.

I’m already on the mom project site and have been trying to network locally, but I just can’t believe that I can’t even get an interview for any position. I’m not expecting that my masters guarantees me anything, but just because I took 5 years off to raise kids doesn’t mean that I should be completely unemployable except for working as a cashier at target or a receptionist at a medical office. In the medical sales industry, it’s known as the golden handcuffs, because you can make good money and the job offers a lot of perks, but it can be very hard to leave the industry or do anything other than sales, as sales reps tend to get pigeonholed. Many reps hate their jobs after a while, but they get stuck because there is nowhere else to go, particularly without taking a big pay cut or starting at entry level somewhere else.
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Old 01-07-2019, 07:09 AM
 
2,078 posts, read 606,160 times
Reputation: 2961
Quote:
Originally Posted by budgetwise5 View Post
I’m already on the mom project site and have been trying to network locally, but I just can’t believe that I can’t even get an interview for any position. I’m not expecting that my masters guarantees me anything, but just because I took 5 years off to raise kids doesn’t mean that I should be completely unemployable except for working as a cashier at target or a receptionist at a medical office. In the medical sales industry, it’s known as the golden handcuffs, because you can make good money and the job offers a lot of perks, but it can be very hard to leave the industry or do anything other than sales, as sales reps tend to get pigeonholed. Many reps hate their jobs after a while, but they get stuck because there is nowhere else to go, particularly without taking a big pay cut or starting at entry level somewhere else.
Time after time I see that having kids in America is a fruitless endeavor. Especially as a Woman, contrary to popular media - You can't have it all. You will either sacrifice career or family. Most successful Women I've seen in the F100's I've consulted for and now work for directly all chose Career over family. Grandma, her husband, the nanny or someone else had to pick up the slack. Future generations of young Women see this and are making different decisions in life as a result. Many are opting out of college (despite record enrollment of Women into University) and choosing to have a family at a young age (with or without the Father involved) at lower income levels which allows them to raise the child with more time and attention but at a lower quality of life and partly on the tax payer's dime.

The reason we don't have Japan's problem (aside from massive immigration) is people here are not ashamed to be on welfare and the welfare benefits are much more comprehensive and is expanding to help those in "upper brackets" of poverty. (400-500%+ of poverty level which I believe reach into minimum wage for a mother of 1 in many regions).

The solution to me is to force employers to really support Women and families and put their money where their mouth is. In Europe, as with many other things there are stringent regulations on providing flexibility for Women with young children. After all this is the nation's next generation can we really afford to neglect them?

Instead, Congress continues to cut corps slack and refuses to force them to hire these young Mothers who have been away from the workforce. So now the tax payer has to pick up the dime. We have many options here but growing domestic debt should not be the go-to option. Employers have job openings and Mothers want to work. There will be those who say "Maybe they don't meet the qualifications/aren't a good fit". We are bleeding out of both sides now. The job is unfilled and social benefits are potentially being used. It is a lose-lose situation that the private sector needs to address. It is like a snake that is eating itself. Private corps complain taxes are TOO HIGH but don't hire enough people so the politicians have to raise social welfare benefits because too many people are out of work in a certain region.

Government and Corporations need to work together to raise the American middle class which will solve both of their issues. Incentivize corporations to hire and re-train long term unemployed/underemployed with lower taxes. The math works - These people will get OFF social benefits and ON the payroll. And then PAY taxes into the system. You can not only offset the tax relief provided by the corp in the short term but generate a surplus as that person continues to remain employed in aggregate down the road it means more budget for the State to spend on critical projects like bridges/tunnels and roads as well as medical research.
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