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Old 01-20-2019, 12:11 PM
 
2,516 posts, read 724,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Browniesaurus View Post
Yeah, definitely not interested living directly in any city, due to cost. Was thinking Vancouver/Tacoma/Olympia, for WA.
Vancouver is ridiculously expensive. Tacoma same. Olympia, not sure, but still too close for comfort. The west coast is expensive to live in and you're not going to make it on $17/hour pay.


Quote:
* Manufacturing - As...an entry level worker, in food/product manufacturing? I assume there are a couple common types of machines that lots of places use, that I'd be trained on, or have to learn elsewhere first. This may be my best bet, for now, as there are apparently entry level, no experience needed openings(apparently).
Food manufacturing has strict health regulations, you'd have to follow many rules to make sure your hands are clean, you're healthy (usually no working while you have a cold/flu, etc.)

Quote:
* Mechanical Assembly - This caught my eye, as a decently high pay job($17/hr) that's got more to it than braindead Small Parts Assembly work or beer breakage, though it looks like I'd need training from somewhere. Hard to tell the Boring Factor on this one, without seeing it first-hand. I've been trying to contact a job recruiter about an opening.
Sure, but be aware that after assembling the same part 4,000 times, you'll be bored out of your skull.

Quote:
* Locksmith - I've been recommended this job by a few folks. Training is short and only about $600, IIRC, but not sure what to expect for pay.
The problem is that you have to either do self-employment - and finding clients by yourself is a challenge. You'd have to join up with an employer (i.e. locksmithing service) and I don't think think they hire people with no experience. MAYBE they have apprenticeships? Not sure. Research more.

Quote:
* Lineman/crew - You know, those guys who fix up the power lines after storms? Maybe they are all Linemen, without secondary assistants. Danger Factor here, but perhaps much less than Electrician. I assume this would be done by a local/state power company.
OK, a few issues here:
1) This kind of job requires massive amounts of travel. You could be in Seattle one day, and then eastern Washington, the next day. You'll be living out of motel rooms pretty much all your life, and I think they MAY reimburse for this.
2) Research what kind of apprenticeships there are. I doubt they hire people without experience.

Quote:
* Civil Service/Government - As...I have no idea. Quite a slew of jobs and job variation here, so I should definitely give this another good look.
Yes, it is a good idea to go into government/civil service. But there are issues.
1) Veterans get the first dibs on all jobs. If you're not a veteran, you are at a huge disadvantage.
2) Most job ads are for one job opening, and each job opening gets 100-200 applicants. By the time they process all the Veterans, they've already hired the person.
3) Some civil/service government jobs are for cronies, and they're already chosen in advance. You never know which job posting is like this, but this does exist.
4) Government DOES have entry level jobs that require no experience, but due to the Veteran's preference, de-facto, non-vets don't stand a chance.
5) For Federal government jobs, that are entry level, look for positions that have multiple positions open across the country and be willing to move to places that are not expensive. Avoid DC, west coast, northern Atlantic states (NY, NJ, CT, etc.) - I recommend southern states and southwest - such as AZ to NC (including TN) for cost of living.

Quote:
* Lab Tech - Some kind of basic Lab Assistant/Helper, I guess. There was a big company in Phoenix that hired people with non-related degrees, but this is probably not that high of pay anyway.
Research more about this company. Phoenix is a good area for jobs.

Quote:
* Snake Rancher/Breeder - Not sure where something like this exists, haha. Probably somewhere hot, like Texas or FL. And probably a real obscure job to get/find...

Yeah, it is. And you better have experience to get this job for obvious reasons
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Old 01-20-2019, 01:02 PM
 
24 posts, read 8,480 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
...
A lot of good info here That is what I've been needing; actual job info/knowledge. Thanks a lot!

Manufacturing(food, or maybe any) definitely seems like a good fit, and I should be able to snag something without having to move. I know guys make a lot of money doing this. $500 for 36 hour machine operation or CNC training, if I need it. Definitely a skill I can use to get to another state with. I've also seem some sort of electronics production line operator jobs around, which may be a decent fit for my interest in electronics/computer/tech.

Locksmith training is about 4 months(online/on-site) @ $650, but only $40K/$19/hr median. Could be a good back pocket job to have. Same for Lab Tech.

Oh? I thought Vancouver was cheap, compared to Seattle/LA/NYC. Hm. From what I can tell, it seems that WA is the better state to live and work in, over OR, due to economy and taxes, but the difference is probably negligible.

Last edited by Browniesaurus; 01-20-2019 at 01:40 PM..
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Old 01-20-2019, 01:08 PM
 
24 posts, read 8,480 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Start with what you like to do... the 5 most favorite.
Pick ONE. Stick with it. Develop some expertise. Charge what your time is worth.
(in that order)


As to "maximizing"... that's mostly on the spending side of the equation.
Problem is, my only real interests are/were game development, music, and nutrition. Games didn't work out, music is unrealistic, and Nutritionist likely won't pay or fit so well. :\ So, I'm trying to pick something new, chasing money.

Last edited by Browniesaurus; 01-20-2019 at 01:18 PM..
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Old 01-20-2019, 03:40 PM
 
714 posts, read 263,194 times
Reputation: 1870
I know this young man who started his first job as a casual janitor in a hospital, then he took a course to be a CNA. And he got a job for CNA. Later, the hospital had an opening for a Porter position (to transfer patients from one unit to another inside the hospital with higher pay), he applied for it, and he got it. While working as a Porter, he took a course to be a Pharmacy Assistant. Now he is a full-time Pharmacy Assistant in the hospital with pretty good pay. He told me he likes the job and the pay.

Sometimes, some people are not so lucky and don't have the luxury to go to college or university but they are willing to start from the bottom of the ladder, work hard, and they keep upgrading themselves, and eventually they get a better and better job. That way, they don't live in a big debt.

Everybody has a different route to attain a career. When there's a will, there's a way.

Last edited by AnOrdinaryCitizen; 01-20-2019 at 04:16 PM..
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Old 01-20-2019, 05:10 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,628 posts, read 62,508,875 times
Reputation: 32420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Browniesaurus View Post
Problem is...
...you think to much.
Think less. Do more.
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Old 01-21-2019, 04:49 PM
 
11,245 posts, read 8,625,277 times
Reputation: 28355
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnOrdinaryCitizen View Post
I know this young man who started his first job as a casual janitor in a hospital, then he took a course to be a CNA. And he got a job for CNA. Later, the hospital had an opening for a Porter position (to transfer patients from one unit to another inside the hospital with higher pay), he applied for it, and he got it. While working as a Porter, he took a course to be a Pharmacy Assistant. Now he is a full-time Pharmacy Assistant in the hospital with pretty good pay. He told me he likes the job and the pay.

Sometimes, some people are not so lucky and don't have the luxury to go to college or university but they are willing to start from the bottom of the ladder, work hard, and they keep upgrading themselves, and eventually they get a better and better job. That way, they don't live in a big debt.

Everybody has a different route to attain a career. When there's a will, there's a way.
Yes. The key is having ambition and a long term plan. No shame in starting wherever you have to start.
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Old 01-23-2019, 08:08 PM
 
24 posts, read 8,480 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
...you think to much.
Think less. Do more.
What about work smarter, not harder? Working 60 hours/week at a warehouse for 2 years, or 5 years at the computer, or 5 years as a janitor, hasn't really gotten me anywhere. I guess I should have been more clear in my post, that I'm looking for high pay careers to aim for, that more or less fit my personality/abilities. Colleges and the internet probably have the answer, though..

Last edited by Browniesaurus; 01-23-2019 at 08:17 PM..
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Old 01-23-2019, 08:11 PM
 
24 posts, read 8,480 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnOrdinaryCitizen View Post
Sometimes, some people are not so lucky and don't have the luxury to go to college or university but they are willing to start from the bottom of the ladder, work hard, and they keep upgrading themselves, and eventually they get a better and better job. That way, they don't live in a big debt.
Looks like I'm on my way to doing both. Hopefully with success, in one of them.
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Old 01-24-2019, 11:53 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,628 posts, read 62,508,875 times
Reputation: 32420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Browniesaurus View Post
I guess I should have been more clear in my post,
that I'm looking for high pay careers to aim for, that more or less fit my personality/abilities.
The way I read it... you're looking for a magic wand.
Every industry and job category has high and low paid employees.
Some are even doing the same basic work.

Pick ONE. Stick with it. Develop some expertise. Charge what your time is worth.
(in that order)

As to "maximizing"... that's mostly on the spending side of the equation.
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Old 01-26-2019, 04:11 PM
 
24 posts, read 8,480 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
The way I read it... you're looking for a magic wand.
Yes, I'm looking for anything that's a best/good fit, with best pay. If I can't find that, then I gotta compromise one step down for fit, but not pay.

I just need to get out of this area ASAP, I think.
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