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Old 02-25-2019, 04:18 PM
 
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So I am wondering if this is a common expereince: I went for a job interiview (in person) and when the question of salary was brought up, I was told something to the effect of "We pay consistent with what others in your position make in this location (location being NYC)" i.e.. there was no concrete number or range given? In all my job interviews this is the first time when a hard # was not given for a salary. Is this is a new thing now? Is this a New York City thing (my previous jobs have been in NJ)?

Granted this is a lower level, bottom of the totem pole, climb your way up type clerical work, but even for the low level stuff, I always walked out of the interview knowing how much I would get paid.

It's annoying enough when salaries are not posted on the job ad itself (though that seems to be par for the course these days...) but to not even get a hard number seems very strange/off
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Old 02-25-2019, 07:59 PM
 
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You're not even sure YOU are getting an offer yet, right?

In this case I suppose, seeing the number in the offer letter, would give you time to formulate your response, and how you want to negotiate, without hearing the number right in front of the interviewer and having to stay composed and think on the fly.

Now, if they want to call you back for a second interview and you still don't know the number -- or at least the range -- then you have to decide are you willing to go in for another interview, and not even know if the pay will be anywhere near acceptable....which of course, likely depends on how bad you need the job.

Many believe (and I guess it's true) that once you know YOU are the choice, it can strengthen your hand, because they might rather negotiate with you, than move on to the next choice. I think that CAN be true, if you really are much better than the second choice and they REALLY want YOU, not the second choice. BUT, with so many HR folks, already having their second pick on the list and ready to go, it's not like before when they might have had to start the interview process all over again with another batch of candidates. Now-a-days, I think more hiring folks are more than ready to move on to the next choice if the first choice doesn't pan out.

Keep us posted. Good luck.
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Old 02-26-2019, 03:46 AM
 
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Aye, I do not have the job (yet to receive a yea or nay) and their is definitely a difference between "it was a good interview" and "actually job offer". That being said for all the jobs I have interviewed for in the past, whether I got hired or passed over, the pay was always known by at least the 1st in person interview.

But maybe this is the new thing now, don't reveal the salary until the job offer (but honestly I hope this is the exception rather than the rule).
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Old 02-26-2019, 07:22 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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The whole idea of an offer is to give you a salary number, and for you to accept, reject, or try to negotiate more. It would be rare for there to be a set salary ahead of time, when it is made available on the announcement it would normally be a range, with DOE or DOQ. Ours, for example, always show the starting and midpoint on the announcement, and the hiring manager may start the person anywhere within that range. The exception is the union jobs, where there is a fixed starting pay.
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Old 02-27-2019, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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If they didn't provide a salary range, we wouldn't be getting to that point.
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Old 02-27-2019, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX
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So did you ask them what the salary was? Or did they ask you what you are looking for?
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Old 02-27-2019, 08:24 PM
 
2,419 posts, read 689,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
"We pay consistent with what others in your position make in this location (location being NYC)" i.e.. there was no concrete number or range given?
That's very suspicious.

If they won't tell you the numbers, did they demand you give up numbers? If yes, they're power tripping and not worth working for.

If they won't tell you numbers, that tells you they're either not looking for someone and just looking to see what the pay range for the job is to lowball them. "What? You're not finding anyone willing to work for 2009 salaries? KEEP FISHING!"
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Old 03-01-2019, 01:44 PM
 
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The salary has always been part of the job offer in my experience. There may be room for negotiation once they present it.
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Old 03-01-2019, 06:55 PM
 
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In most cases this ends up with a hard number that can't be moved.
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Old 03-05-2019, 11:09 AM
 
1,547 posts, read 401,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
So I am wondering if this is a common expereince: I went for a job interiview (in person) and when the question of salary was brought up, I was told something to the effect of "We pay consistent with what others in your position make in this location (location being NYC)" i.e.. there was no concrete number or range given? In all my job interviews this is the first time when a hard # was not given for a salary. Is this is a new thing now? Is this a New York City thing (my previous jobs have been in NJ)?

Granted this is a lower level, bottom of the totem pole, climb your way up type clerical work, but even for the low level stuff, I always walked out of the interview knowing how much I would get paid.

It's annoying enough when salaries are not posted on the job ad itself (though that seems to be par for the course these days...) but to not even get a hard number seems very strange/off
No, that is not a NYC thing or a NJ thing, or any place thing where someone is running a good business.

Places that don't tell you the salary range for the position, are doing so for a reason, because it is low. If it was actually what they say, there would be no reason not to give you a salary range. They know exactly what they are doing, the jobs are defined for the company based on the cost.

I wouldn't bother scheduling an interview or even going further in a phone screening unless they can tell you the salary range. Anyone who thinks this is inappropriate doesn't understand business. And before anyone with low self-esteem chimes in to call people "greedy" who ask this question, that is being foolish. Because if you are making $100K a year, it is a waste of your time to go in for an interview for a job that pays $50K and to only find that out after an interview or two or when the offer comes in. It is not rude to ask about salary and other compensation, after all, their customers ask for prices all the time for their products and services. If they don't align with their budget, they walk, and you need to be just as professional.
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