U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-28-2019, 09:02 AM
 
15 posts, read 6,667 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Has anyone here had the pleasure (or displeasure) of working at in an Academic environment full time post graduation? I have a Masters degree in public sector work, so it would be ideal for me to try to wiggle myself into a State University position, with plans to maybe pursue a Ph.D from said University.

That said, are there any benefits that these sorts of jobs would have over private sectors? I assume benefits/Security are the biggest two.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-28-2019, 11:11 AM
 
9,778 posts, read 16,986,698 times
Reputation: 18395
Benefits and pay may or may not be on par with the private sector; it really depends on the university. As long as you are not at a university that is in financial trouble/is financially mismanaged, job security is virtually guaranteed as long as you do your job. Pay raises are steady, and vacation accrual will go up based on whatever tiers are established. Working full time and trying to earn a PhD is a lengthy and time consuming process. Tuition remission may not cover PhD programs, or it may just cover programs in higher education administration. What type of job are you looking to get? Do you have relevant work experience?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2019, 02:17 PM
 
15 posts, read 6,667 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe from dayton View Post
Benefits and pay may or may not be on par with the private sector; it really depends on the university. As long as you are not at a university that is in financial trouble/is financially mismanaged, job security is virtually guaranteed as long as you do your job. Pay raises are steady, and vacation accrual will go up based on whatever tiers are established. Working full time and trying to earn a PhD is a lengthy and time consuming process. Tuition remission may not cover PhD programs, or it may just cover programs in higher education administration. What type of job are you looking to get? Do you have relevant work experience?
I've worked as a Grad Assistant during my Masters program, but since then I have had numerous data analytics, and auditing positions in the private sector. All of which have been contract positions.

So I have been applying to any audit positions, business analysis, data analysis positions I can find and I have the relevant experience for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2019, 02:30 PM
 
3,974 posts, read 1,700,976 times
Reputation: 8103
They can be pretty good. My best friend works at a flagship state university, my father worked for a state university (as faculty) and another good friend works at a well recognized national private university. The pay is often worse than you’d find in a typical private sector setting, but the benefits are good. I think my friend at the state university gets 1/2 tuition for her kids to attend that school. I believe my dad got roughly equivalent to what it would cost to attend a public university in state (tuition + room and board). My friend at the private university has benefits depending on how long she is there, but it can go up to 100% tuition reimbursement for children. Tuition reimbursement is typically available at some level, but it may depend on the program. My friend at the state university had her husband work there before she was there and he had 1/2 coverage for part-time attendance for a master’s degree in information systems.

One thing that is good about the jobs is that they appear to be quite flexible as compared to the private sector. My dad was faculty, so his job wasn’t as flexible as some others, but for my friends who are non-faculty, it is not too strict in terms of the time they have to come in. Both of my friends who work at the universities have kids and their spouses travel on average 1-2 weeks per month for work, so flexibility was a must for them in terms of work schedule and occasionally having to miss. That was not a problem for either of them even from the start.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2019, 07:30 PM
 
2,424 posts, read 693,558 times
Reputation: 3416
Run away from academia.

https://100rsns.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2019, 09:09 PM
 
9,778 posts, read 16,986,698 times
Reputation: 18395
Did you even bother to read the OP's post before linking your information (sic).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2019, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,984 posts, read 8,410,669 times
Reputation: 15568
I have worked at several universities, including flagship state and Ivy.

I agree with other posters, in that benefits vary from one institution to another, and from one type of job (faculty, managerial, professional, hourly) to another.

As a very rough rule of thumb, salaries are not as high as private sector, benefits are better, and bureaucracy is pretty prevalent.

Some universities will pay for doctoral programs, others will not. HR offices are usually pretty transparent, so go ahead and ask. Almost universally tuition remission is limited to full-time employees, so you may find it difficulty to work FT and pursue a doctoral program. More typically people finance doctoral programs by holding TA/RA positions.

Jobs are pretty secure, although I have seen RIFs and firings. One thing with universities is that they are contra-cyclical to the economy. When unemployment rises, people go back to school, so enrollments rise. If a university is tuition dependent that can be a boon, if they are state supported, legislatures can still cut money from academic budgets despite booming enrollments.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2019, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Arlington, VA
29 posts, read 9,548 times
Reputation: 61
I have worked at a public university for two years and a private university for about six months. University employment is the best I have had. Working for Cal State University means being a state employee I think, so my pay was just a fraction of what the overall compensation was. Very good benefits, sick leave, vacation, studying opportunities. The university is a distinct environment and some of us just love it. I'm trying to get back into it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 05:59 AM
 
15 posts, read 6,667 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedreadedskyhook View Post
I have worked at a public university for two years and a private university for about six months. University employment is the best I have had. Working for Cal State University means being a state employee I think, so my pay was just a fraction of what the overall compensation was. Very good benefits, sick leave, vacation, studying opportunities. The university is a distinct environment and some of us just love it. I'm trying to get back into it.
How was the job security?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2019, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Arlington, VA
29 posts, read 9,548 times
Reputation: 61
Default job security

It depends on where you work. However, working for a public university, I was a union employee and there were a lot of hoops that had to be jumped through to get anyone fired. I know there was at least one guy in my department who was in the dog house, and they still were very patient with him. I think he's still working there. It's really an uphill battle to fire someone in that environment.

I just accepted another university job here on the East Coast, and even though it's a private university, it's still a union job. So I guess it varies. I have to say that the first private university job I had was not actually for the university, but Aramark who was contracted with the university. That's why the pay was so low. You want to work for the school itself. My understanding is that state run institutions are generally better as we get pensions (at least in CA) whereas private school employees don't.

Last edited by thedreadedskyhook; 03-06-2019 at 03:03 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top